Frases de Denise Levertov

Denise Levertov Foto
1   0

Denise Levertov

Fecha de nacimiento: 24. Octubre 1923
Fecha de muerte: 20. Diciembre 1997

Denise Levertov fue una poeta inglesa, nacionalizada estadounidense.

Frases Denise Levertov

„And for
wanting to know it,
for assuming there is
such a secret, yes,
for that
most of all.“

—  Denise Levertov
O Taste and See : New Poems (1964), The Secret, Context: I love them for finding what I can't find, and for loving me for the line I wrote, and for forgetting it so that a thousand times, till death finds them, they may discover it again, in other lines in other happenings. And for wanting to know it, for assuming there is such a secret, yes, for that most of all.

„One must imagine,
One must deeply imagine“

—  Denise Levertov
Conversation in Moscow, Context: To serve the people, one must write for the ideal reader. Only for the ideal reader. And who or what is that ideal reader? God. One must imagine, One must deeply imagine

„Fire he sang,
that trees fear, and I, a tree, rejoiced in its flames.“

—  Denise Levertov
A Tree Telling of Orpheus (1968), Context: Fire he sang, that trees fear, and I, a tree, rejoiced in its flames. New buds broke forth from me though it was full summer. As though his lyre (now I knew its name) were both frost and fire, its chords flamed up to the crown of me. I was seed again. I was fern in the swamp. I was coal.

„You are the stream, the fish, the light,
the pulsing shadow.
You the unchanging presence, in whom all
moves and changes.“

—  Denise Levertov
A Door in the Hive (1989), Flickering Mind, Context: You are the stream, the fish, the light, the pulsing shadow. You the unchanging presence, in whom all moves and changes. How can I focus my flickering, perceive at the fountain's heart the sapphire I know is there?

„I would say that the imagination, which synergizes intellect, emotion and instinct, is the perceptive organ through which it is possible, though not inevitable, to experience God.“

—  Denise Levertov
Context: Acknowledgement, and celebration, of mystery probably constitutes the most consistent theme of my poetry from its very beginnings. Because it is a matter of which I am conscious, it is possible, however imprecisely, to call it an intellectual position; but it is one which emphasizes the incapacity of reason alone (much though I delight in elegant logic) to comprehend experience, and considers Imagination the chief of human faculties. It must therefore be by the exercise of that faculty that one moves toward faith, and possibly by its failure that one rejects it as delusion. Poems present their testimony as circumstantial evidences, not as closing argument. Where Wallace Stevens says, "God and the imagination are one," I would say that the imagination, which synergizes intellect, emotion and instinct, is the perceptive organ through which it is possible, though not inevitable, to experience God. A Poets View (1984)

„I was seed again.
I was fern in the swamp.
I was coal.“

—  Denise Levertov
A Tree Telling of Orpheus (1968), Context: Fire he sang, that trees fear, and I, a tree, rejoiced in its flames. New buds broke forth from me though it was full summer. As though his lyre (now I knew its name) were both frost and fire, its chords flamed up to the crown of me. I was seed again. I was fern in the swamp. I was coal.

„It is said he made his earth-journey, and lost
what he sought.
It is said they felled him
and cut up his limbs for firewood.
And it is said
his head still sang and was swept out to sea singing.“

—  Denise Levertov
A Tree Telling of Orpheus (1968), Context: It is said he made his earth-journey, and lost what he sought. It is said they felled him and cut up his limbs for firewood. And it is said his head still sang and was swept out to sea singing.

„I long for poems of an inner harmony in utter contrast to the chaos in which they exist.“

—  Denise Levertov
Context: I long for poems of an inner harmony in utter contrast to the chaos in which they exist. Insofar as poetry has a social function it is to awaken sleepers by other means than shock. Statement on poetics in The New American Poetry (1960) edited by Donald Allen

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„He must return,
first, in Divine patience, and know
hunger again, and give
to humble friends the joy
of giving Him food — fish and a honeycomb.“

—  Denise Levertov
A Door in the Hive (1989), Ikon: The Harrowing of Hell, Context: All these He will swiftly lead to the Paradise road: they are safe. That done, there must take place that struggle no human presumes to picture: living, dying, descending to rescue the just from shadow, were lesser travails than this: to break through earth and stone of the faithless world back to the cold sepulcher, tearstained stifling shroud; to break from them back into breath and heartbeat, and walk the world again, closed into days and weeks again, wounds of His anguish open, and Spirit streaming through every cell of flesh so that if mortal sight could bear to perceive it, it would be seen His mortal flesh was lit from within, now, and aching for home. He must return, first, in Divine patience, and know hunger again, and give to humble friends the joy of giving Him food — fish and a honeycomb.

„To leave the open fields
and enter the forest, that was the rite.
Knowing there was mystery, they could go.“

—  Denise Levertov
Context: To leave the open fields and enter the forest, that was the rite. Knowing there was mystery, they could go. Go back now! And he receded among the multitude of forms, the twists and shadows they saw now, listening to the hum of the world's wood. "The Novices" (1960)

„I love them
for finding what
I can't find, and for loving me
for the line I wrote,
and for forgetting it“

—  Denise Levertov
O Taste and See : New Poems (1964), The Secret, Context: I love them for finding what I can't find, and for loving me for the line I wrote, and for forgetting it so that a thousand times, till death finds them, they may discover it again, in other lines in other happenings. And for wanting to know it, for assuming there is such a secret, yes, for that most of all.

„And I
in terror
but not in doubt of
what I must do
in anguish, in haste,
wrenched from the earth root after root,
the soil heaving and cracking, the moss tearing asunder —“

—  Denise Levertov
A Tree Telling of Orpheus (1968), Context: And I in terror but not in doubt of what I must do in anguish, in haste, wrenched from the earth root after root, the soil heaving and cracking, the moss tearing asunder — and behind me the others: my brothers forgotten since dawn. In the forest they too had heard, and were pulling their roots in pain out of a thousand years' layers of dead leaves, rolling the rocks away, breaking themselves out of their depths.

„Delivered out of raw continual pain,
smell of darkness, groans of those others
to whom he was chained —“

—  Denise Levertov
Oblique Prayers (1984), Context: Delivered out of raw continual pain, smell of darkness, groans of those others to whom he was chained — unchained, and led past the sleepers, door after door silently opening — out! St. Peter and the Angel

„We have stood here since,
in our new life.
We have waited.
He does not return.“

—  Denise Levertov
A Tree Telling of Orpheus (1968), Context: By dawn he was gone. We have stood here since, in our new life. We have waited. He does not return.

„Poems present their testimony as circumstantial evidences, not as closing argument.“

—  Denise Levertov
Context: Acknowledgement, and celebration, of mystery probably constitutes the most consistent theme of my poetry from its very beginnings. Because it is a matter of which I am conscious, it is possible, however imprecisely, to call it an intellectual position; but it is one which emphasizes the incapacity of reason alone (much though I delight in elegant logic) to comprehend experience, and considers Imagination the chief of human faculties. It must therefore be by the exercise of that faculty that one moves toward faith, and possibly by its failure that one rejects it as delusion. Poems present their testimony as circumstantial evidences, not as closing argument. Where Wallace Stevens says, "God and the imagination are one," I would say that the imagination, which synergizes intellect, emotion and instinct, is the perceptive organ through which it is possible, though not inevitable, to experience God. A Poets View (1984)

„Acknowledgement, and celebration, of mystery probably constitutes the most consistent theme of my poetry from its very beginnings.“

—  Denise Levertov
Context: Acknowledgement, and celebration, of mystery probably constitutes the most consistent theme of my poetry from its very beginnings. Because it is a matter of which I am conscious, it is possible, however imprecisely, to call it an intellectual position; but it is one which emphasizes the incapacity of reason alone (much though I delight in elegant logic) to comprehend experience, and considers Imagination the chief of human faculties. It must therefore be by the exercise of that faculty that one moves toward faith, and possibly by its failure that one rejects it as delusion. Poems present their testimony as circumstantial evidences, not as closing argument. Where Wallace Stevens says, "God and the imagination are one," I would say that the imagination, which synergizes intellect, emotion and instinct, is the perceptive organ through which it is possible, though not inevitable, to experience God. A Poets View (1984)

„He told of journeys,
of where sun and moon go while we stand in dark,
of an earth-journey he dreamed he would take some day
deeper than roots …“

—  Denise Levertov
A Tree Telling of Orpheus (1968), Context: He told of journeys, of where sun and moon go while we stand in dark, of an earth-journey he dreamed he would take some day deeper than roots... He told of the dreams of man, wars, passions, griefs, and I, a tree, understood words – ah, it seemed my thick bark would split like a sapling's that grew too fast in the spring when a late frost wounds it.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Aniversarios de hoy
Santiago Roncagliolo Foto
Santiago Roncagliolo15
escritor peruano 1975
Ernest Cline Foto
Ernest Cline30
escritor estadounidense 1972
Mitch Hedberg Foto
Mitch Hedberg1
1968 - 2005
Cornelio Saavedra Foto
Cornelio Saavedra5
estadista y militar argentino 1759 - 1829
Otros 49 aniversarios hoy
x