„We all of us need to be toppled off the throne of self, my dear," he said. "Perched up there the tears of others are never upon our own cheek.“

Elizabeth Goudge2
1900 - 1984
Anuncio

Citas similares

Cody McFadyen Foto
Anuncio
 Sueton Foto
Dan Brown Foto
Larry the Cable Guy Foto
 Homér Foto

„Not that I'd grudge a tear
for any man gone down to meet his fate.
What other tribute can we pay to wretched men
than to cut a lock, let tears roll down our cheeks?“

—  Homér Ancient Greek epic poet, author of the Iliad and the Odyssey 750
IV. 195–198 (tr. Robert Fagles).

 Homér Foto

„He kissed his son, and a tear fell from his cheek on to the ground, for he had restrained all tears till now.“

—  Homér Ancient Greek epic poet, author of the Iliad and the Odyssey 750
XVI. 190–191 (tr. Samuel Butler).

Edgar Allan Poe Foto

„Perched upon a bust of Pallas, just above my chamber door,—
Perched, and sat, and nothing more.“

—  Edgar Allan Poe American author, poet, editor and literary critic 1809 - 1849
Stanza 7.

Anuncio
Abu Nuwas Foto
Julian of Norwich Foto
Ursula K. Le Guin Foto

„All of us have to learn how to invent our lives, make them up, imagine them. We need to be taught these skills; we need guides to show us how. If we don't, our lives get made up for us by other people.“

—  Ursula K. Le Guin American writer 1929
The Operating Instructions in The Wave in the Mind: Talks and Essays on the Writer, the Reader, and the Imagination (2004)

Diana Gabaldon Foto
Anuncio
Michel De Montaigne Foto

„On the highest throne in the world, we still sit only on our own bottom.“

—  Michel De Montaigne, The Complete Essays
Context: No matter that we may mount on stilts, we still must walk on our own legs. And on the highest throne in the world, we still sit only on our own bottom. Book III, Ch. 13

 Elagabalus Foto

„Thrust upon the throne, Elagabalus lacked the required discipline. For a while, Romans may well have been amused by his "Merrie Monarch" behavior, but he ended up offending those he needed to inspire.“

—  Elagabalus Roman Emperor 203 - 222
Context: Scholars have often viewed the failure of Elagabalus' reign as a clash of cultures between "Eastern" (Syrian) and "Western" (Roman), but this dichotomy is not very useful. The criticisms of the emperor's effeminacy and sexual behavior mirror those made of earlier emperors (such as Nero) and do not need to be explained through ethnic stereotypes. With regard to religion, the emperor's promotion of the cult of the Emesene sun-god was certainly ridiculed by contemporary observers, but this cult was popular among soldiers and would remain so. Moreover, the cult continued to be promoted by later emperors of non-Syrian ethnicity, calling the god The Unconquered Sun (Sol Invictus). Elagabalus is best understood as a teenager who was raised near the luxury of the imperial court and who then suffered a drastic change of fortune brought about by the sudden deaths — probably within one year — of his father, his grandfather and his cousin, the emperor Caracalla. Thrust upon the throne, Elagabalus lacked the required discipline. For a while, Romans may well have been amused by his "Merrie Monarch" behavior, but he ended up offending those he needed to inspire. His reign tragically demonstrated the difficulties of having a teenage emperor. Michael L. Meckler, in "Elagabalus (218-222 A.D.)" in De Imperatoribus Romanis : An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors (1997) http://www.roman-emperors.org/elagabal.htm

Anne Brontë Foto

„How odd it is that we so often weep for each other’s distresses, when we shed not a tear for our own!“

—  Anne Brontë British novelist and poet 1820 - 1849
Ch. XXXII : Comparisons: Information Rejected; Helen

„In time of the crises of the spirit, we are aware of all of need, our need for each other and our need for ourselves. We call up our fullness; we turn, and act.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser poet and political activist 1913 - 1980
Context: In time of the crises of the spirit, we are aware of all of need, our need for each other and our need for ourselves. We call up our fullness; we turn, and act. We begin to be aware of correspondences, of the acknowledgement in us of necessity, and of the lands. And poetry, among all this — where is there a place for poetry? If poetry as it comes to us through action were all we had, it would be very much. For the dense and crucial moments, spoken under the stress of realization, full-bodied and compelling in their imagery, arrive with music, with our many kinds of theatre, and in the great prose. If we had these only, we would be open to the same influences, however diluted and applied. For these ways in which poetry reaches past the barriers set up by our culture, reaching toward those who refuse it in essential presence, are various, many-meaning, and certainly — in this period — more acceptable. They stand in the same relation to poetry as applied science to pure science. p. 169; part of this statement is also used in the "Introduction"

Siguiente