„Poets knew that isolation in nature, far from people and things man-made, was good for the soul, and he'd always identified with poets.“

Nicholas Sparks Foto
Nicholas Sparks95
es uno de los mejores novelistas de amor 1965
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Northrop Frye Foto

„The poet...is an identifier: everything he sees in nature he identifies with human life.“

—  Northrop Frye Canadian literary critic and literary theorist 1912 - 1991
Context: The poet... is an identifier: everything he sees in nature he identifies with human life.

 Pindar Foto

„Whoever knows many things
By nature is a poet.“

—  Pindar Ancient Greek poet -522 - -446 a.C.
Context: Whoever knows many things By nature is a poet. Olympian 2, line 87; page 16; the Greek simply says: <br/> "wise is one who knows much by nature," but σοφός is Pindar's usual word for poet. Variant translations: Inborn of nature's wisdom <br/>The poet's truth.

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Derek Walcott Foto
James Elroy Flecker Foto

„The poet's business is not to save the soul of man but to make it worth saving.“

—  James Elroy Flecker Poet 1884 - 1915
Quoted by Louis Untermeyer in Modern British Poetry http://books.google.com/books?id=GiwMAQAAIAAJ&q=%22The+poet's+business%22+%22is+not+to+save+the+soul+of+man+but+to+make+it+worth+saving%22&pg=PA178#v=onepage (1920)

Ralph Waldo Emerson Foto
Ram Dass Foto
Layal Abboud Foto
Thomas Campbell Foto
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James Joyce Foto

„He tried to weigh his soul to see if it was a poet's soul.“

—  James Joyce Irish novelist and poet 1882 - 1941
Context: He tried to weigh his soul to see if it was a poet's soul. Melancholy was the dominant note of his temperament, he thought, but it was a melancholy tempered by recurrences of faith and resignation and simple joy. If he could give expression to it in a book of poems perhaps men would listen. "A Little Cloud"

John Dryden Foto

„To begin then with Shakespeare; he was the man who of all Modern, and perhaps Ancient Poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul.“

—  John Dryden English poet and playwright of the XVIIth century 1631 - 1700
Context: To begin then with Shakespeare; he was the man who of all Modern, and perhaps Ancient Poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the Images of Nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learn'd; he needed not the spectacles of Books to read Nature; he look'd inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of Mankind. He is many times flat, insipid; his Comick wit degenerating into clenches; his serious swelling into Bombast. But he is alwayes great, when some great occasion is presented to him: no man can say he ever had a fit subject for his wit, and did not then raise himself as high above the rest of the Poets Essay of Dramatick Poesie (1668)

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Charles Baudelaire Foto

„All great poets become naturally, fatally, critics.“

—  Charles Baudelaire French poet 1821 - 1867
XIV: "Richard Wagner et Tannhäuser à Paris" http://fr.wikisource.org/wiki/Richard_Wagner_et_Tannh%C3%A4user_%C3%A0_Paris_%28L%E2%80%99Art_romantique%29

William Faulkner Foto

„The poet faces his heart, his soul and his mood.“

—  Max Michelson American poet 1880 - 1953
Review of 'Cadences' by F. S. Flint , Poetry ,vol 8, no 5 1916

Edward Hirsch Foto