„Music… can name the unnameable and communicate the unknowable.“

Leonard Bernstein Foto
Leonard Bernstein4
compositor, pianista y director de orquesta estadounidense 1918 - 1990
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Jonathan Safran Foer Foto

„This form of the organization of production has been named communism.“

—  Gustave de Molinari Belgian political economist and classical liberal theorist 1819 - 1912
Context: If the roused and insurgent consumers secure the means of production of the salt industry, in all probability they will confiscate this industry for their own profit, and their first thought will be, not to relegate it to free competition, but rather to exploit it, in common, for their own account. They will then name a director or a directive committee to operate the saltworks, to whom they will allocate the funds necessary to defray the costs of salt production. Then, since the experience of the past will have made them suspicious and distrustful, since they will be afraid that the director named by them will seize production for his own benefit, and simply reconstitute by open or hidden means the old monopoly for his own profit, they will elect delegates, representatives entrusted with appropriating the funds necessary for production, with watching over their use, and with making sure that the salt produced is equally distributed to those entitled to it. The production of salt will be organized in this manner.This form of the organization of production has been named communism.When this organization is applied to a single commodity, the communism is said to be partial.When it is applied to all commodities, the communism is said to be complete.But whether communism is partial or complete, political economy is no more tolerant of it than it is of monopoly, of which it is merely an extension. p. 31

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Niklas Luhmann Foto

„Humans cannot communicate; not even their brains can communicate; not even their conscious minds can communicate. Only communication can communicate.“

—  Niklas Luhmann German sociologist, administration expert, and social systems theorist 1927 - 1998
Luhmann (1988) "How can the mind participate in communication" In: Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht et all. (Ed.) Materialities of Communication. p. 371 ( link http://books.google.nl/books?id=WDmrAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA371).

Lois Lowry Foto
Daniel Levitin Foto

„Music may be the activity that prepared our pre-human ancestors for speech communication and“

—  Daniel Levitin American psychologist 1957
Context: Music may be the activity that prepared our pre-human ancestors for speech communication and for the very cognitive, representational flexibility necessary to become humans.

 Thucydides Foto
Emil M. Cioran Foto
 Enya Foto

„There was no name on the music she was writing. All I knew was that hard work succeeded.“

—  Enya Irish singer, songwriter, and musician 1961
Context: Enya knew nothing about recording, about production or arrangements. Originally, we were stock-piling music and just letting her get on with it. There was no name on the music she was writing. All I knew was that hard work succeeded. Nicky Ryan

Mohammad Reza Pahlavi Foto
Swathi Thirunal Rama Varma Foto

„All that I write whether poetry or music centred around God. This is an act of faith in me. Music is not worth its name otherwise.“

—  Swathi Thirunal Rama Varma Maharajah of Travencore 1813 - 1846
V. K. Subramanian (2013), in 101 Mystics of India, p. 181 http://books.google.co.in/books?id=_uswAgAAQBAJ&pg=PA181

Adlai Stevenson Foto

„Because we believe in the free mind we are also fighting those who, in the name of anti-Communism, would assail the community of freedom itself.“

—  Adlai Stevenson mid-20th-century Governor of Illinois and Ambassador to the UN 1900 - 1965
As quoted in Portrait — Adlai E. Stevenson : Politician, Diplomat, Friend (1965) by Alden Whitman

 Morrissey Foto
Robert Crumb Foto

„Before industrial civilization, local and regional communities made their own music, their own entertainment.“

—  Robert Crumb American cartoonist 1943
Context: Before industrial civilization, local and regional communities made their own music, their own entertainment. The esthetics were based on traditions that went far back in time—i. e. folklore. But part of the con of mass culture is to make you forget history, disconnect you from tradition and the past. Sometimes that can be a good thing. Sometimes it can even be revolutionary. But tradition can also keep culture on an authentic human level, the homespun as opposed to the mass produced. Industrial civilization figured out how to manufacture popular culture and sell it back to the people. You have to marvel at the ingenuity of it! The problem is that the longer this buying and selling goes on, the more hollow and bankrupt the culture becomes. It loses its fertility, like worn out, ravaged farmland. Eventually, the yokels who bought the hype, the pitch, they want in on the game. When there are no more naive hicks left, you have a culture where everybody is conning each other all the time. There are no more earnest "squares" left—everybody's "hip", everybody is cynical. The R. Crumb Handbook by Robert Crumb and Peter Poplaski (2005), p. 180

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