„Language most shows a man; speak that I may see thee“

—  Ben Jonson
Ben Jonson Foto
Ben Jonson2
1572 - 1637
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Dag Hammarskjöld Foto
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Octavio Paz Foto

„It may be that, like things which speak to themselves in their language of things, language does not speak of things or of the world: it may speak only of itself and to itself.“

—  Octavio Paz Mexican writer laureated with the 1990 Nobel Prize for Literature 1914 - 1998
Context: Fixity is always momentary. But how can it always be so? If it were, it would not be momentary — or would not be fixity. What did I mean by that phrase? I probably had in mind the opposition between motion and motionlessness, an opposition that the adverb always designates as continual and universal: it embraces all of time and applies to every circumstance. My phrase tends to dissolve this opposition and hence represents a sly violation of the principle of identity. I say “sly” because I chose the word momentary as an adjectival qualifier of fixity in order to tone down the violence of the contrast between movement and motionlessness. A little rhetorical trick intended to give an air of plausibility to my violation of the rules of logic. The relations between rhetoric and ethics are disturbing: the ease with which language can be twisted is worrisome, and the fact that our minds accept these perverse games so docilely is no less cause for concern. We ought to subject language to a diet of bread and water if we wish to keep it from being corrupted and from corrupting us. (The trouble is that a-diet-of-bread-and-water is a figurative expression, as is the-corruption-of-language-and-its-contagions.) It is necessary to unweave (another metaphor) even the simplest phrases in order to determine what it is that they contain (more figurative expressions) and what they are made of and how (what is language made of? and most important of all, is it already made, or is it something that is perpetually in the making?). Unweave the verbal fabric: reality will appear. (Two metaphors.) Can reality be the reverse of the fabric, the reverse of metaphor — that which is on the other side of language? (Language has no reverse, no opposite faces, no right or wrong side.) Perhaps reality too is a metaphor (of what and/or of whom?). Perhaps things are not things but words: metaphors, words for other things. With whom and of what do word-things speak? (This page is a sack of word-things.) It may be that, like things which speak to themselves in their language of things, language does not speak of things or of the world: it may speak only of itself and to itself. Ch. 4 Ch. 4 -->

José Rizal Foto

„Man is multiplied by the number of languages he possesses and speaks.“

—  José Rizal Filipino writer, ophthalmologist, polyglot and nationalist 1861 - 1896
"Los Viajes"

Meister Eckhart Foto

„The colors that a speaker "sees" often depend very much on the language he speaks“

—  Peter Farb American academic and writer 1929 - 1980
Context: The colors that a speaker "sees" often depend very much on the language he speaks, because each language offers its own high-codability color terms.

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Richard Fuller (minister) Foto
Walter Savage Landor Foto
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Benjamin Franklin Foto

„Let all Men know thee, but no man know thee thoroughly: Men freely ford that see the shallows.“

—  Benjamin Franklin American author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, inventor, civic activist, statesman,... 1706 - 1790
Poor Richard's Almanack (1743)

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Frances Ridley Havergal Foto
George Canning Foto

„I give thee sixpence! I will see thee damned first.“

—  George Canning British statesman and politician 1770 - 1827
The Friend of Humanity and the Knife-Grinder.

William Wordsworth Foto
José María Aznar Foto

„Catalan language is one of the most complete and perfect expressions that I know from the point of view regarding language, I not only read it since many years ago, but I understand it. Moreover, I speak it intimately too.“

—  José María Aznar Spanish President from 1996 to 2004 1953
In: L' Aznar destrossant la llengua catalana http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5m95BZOKDPs, December 2006. On an interview with the Catalan Autonomous Television, just before politically coallitioning with Catalan, Canarian and Basque nationalists