„Come to the edge," he said.
They said, "We are afraid."
Come to the edge," he said.
They came.
He pushed them… and they flew.“

Última actualización 23 de Octubre de 2017. Historia
Guillaume Apollinaire Foto
Guillaume Apollinaire4
escritor francés 1880 - 1918
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Guillaume Apollinaire Foto

„Come to the edge.
We might fall.
Come to the edge.
It's too high!
COME TO THE EDGE!
And they came
And he pushed
And they flew.“

—  Christopher Logue Poet, screenwriter, actor 1926 - 2011

Originally written for a poster advertising an Apollinaire exhibition at the ICA in 1961 or 1962, and there titled "Apollinaire Said". The poem is therefore often misattributed to Guillaume Apollinaire. (Source: Quote…Unquote Newsletter, July 1995, p. 2).
Fuente: "Come to the Edge", from New Numbers (London: Jonathan Cape, 1969) pp. 65-66.

Guillaume Apollinaire Foto

„Come to the edge.
We might fall.
Come to the edge.
It's too high!
COME TO THE EDGE!
And they came
And he pushed
And they flew.“

—  Guillaume Apollinaire French poet 1880 - 1918

Christopher Logue's poem "Come to the Edge" from New Numbers (London: Cape, 1969) pp. 65-66. It was originally written for a poster advertising an Apollinaire exhibition at the ICA in 1961 or 1962, and was titled "Apollinaire Said"; hence it is often misattributed to Apollinaire (Source: Quote…Unquote Newsletter, July 1995, p. 2).
Misattributed

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„He said to shine them anyway. He said to shine them for the Fat Lady.“

—  Jerome David Salinger, libro Franny and Zooey

Franny and Zooey (1961), Zooey (1957)
Contexto: Seymour'd told me to shine my shoes just as I was going out the door with Waker. I was furious. The studio audience were all morons, the announcer was a moron, the sponsors were morons, and I just damn well wasn't going to shine my shoes for them, I told Seymour. I said they couldn't see them anyway, where we sat. He said to shine them anyway. He said to shine them for the Fat Lady. I didn't know what the hell he was talking about, but he had a very Seymour look on his face, and so I did it. He never did tell me who the Fat Lady was, but I shined my shoes for the Fat Lady every time I ever went on the air again — all the years you and I were on the program together, if you remember. I don't think I missed more than just a couple of times. This terribly clear, clear picture of the Fat Lady formed in my mind. I had her sitting on this porch all day, swatting flies, with her radio going full-blast from morning till night. I figured the heat was terrible, and she probably had cancer, and — I don't know. Anyway, it seemed goddam clear why Seymour wanted me to shine my shoes when I went on the air. It made sense.

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