„Man cannot possess anything as long as he fears death. But to him who does not fear it, everything belongs. If there was no suffering, man would not know his limits, would not know himself.“

—  León Tolstói, libro Guerra y paz
León Tolstói Foto
León Tolstói132
escritor ruso 1828 - 1910
Anuncio

Citas similares

Leigh Brackett Foto

„The man who doesn’t fear, doesn’t live long. I fear everything.“

—  Leigh Brackett American novelist and screenwriter 1915 - 1978
The Ginger Star (1974), Chapter 5 (p. 32)

Brandon Sanderson Foto
Anuncio
Miguel de Unamuno Foto

„A man who had never known suffering, either in greater or less degree, would scarcely possess consciousness of himself.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno 19th-20th century Spanish writer and philosopher 1864 - 1936
The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), IX : Faith, Hope, and Charity, Context: Suffering is a spiritual thing. It is the most immediate revelation of consciousness, and it may be that our body was given us simply in order that suffering might be enabled to manifest itself. A man who had never known suffering, either in greater or less degree, would scarcely possess consciousness of himself. The child first cries at birth when the air, entering into his lungs and limiting him, seems to say to him: You have to breathe me in order to live!

Thomas Carlyle Foto
Leo Buscaglia Foto
Michael Moorcock Foto
Marcus Aurelius Foto
John Donne Foto
Marcus Annaeus Lucanus Foto

„If a man would be righteous, let him depart from a court. Virtue is incompatible with absolute power. He who is ashamed to commit cruelty must always fear it.“

—  Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, libro Farsalia
Pharsalia, Exeat aula qui volt esse pius. Virtus et summa potestas non coeunt; semper metuet quem saeva pudebunt. Book VIII, line 493 (tr. J. D. Duff).

 Novalis Foto

„The waking man looks without fear at this offspring of his lawless Imagination; for he knows that they are but vain Spectres of his weakness.“

—  Novalis German poet and writer 1772 - 1801
Pupils at Sais (1799), Context: The waking man looks without fear at this offspring of his lawless Imagination; for he knows that they are but vain Spectres of his weakness. He feels himself lord of the world: his me hovers victorious over the Abyss; and will through Eternities hover aloft above that endless Vicissitude. Harmony is what his spirit strives to promulgate, to extend. He will even to infinitude grow more and more harmonious with himself and with his Creation; and at every step behold the all-efficiency of a high moral Order in the Universe, and what is purest of his Me come forth into brighter and brighter clearness. This significance of the World is Reason; for her sake is the World here; and when it is grown to be the arena of a childlike, expanding Reason, it will one day become the divine Image of her Activity, the scene of a genuine Church. Till then let man honour Nature as the Emblem of his own Spirit; the Emblem ennobling itself, along with him, to unlimited degrees. Let him, therefore, who would arrive at knowledge of Nature, train his moral sense, let him act and conceive in accordance with the noble Essence of his Soul; and as if of herself Nature will become open to him. Moral Action is that great and only Experiment, in which all riddles of the most manifold appearances explain themselves. Whoso understands it, and in rigid sequence of Thought can lay it open, is forever master of Nature.

John Steinbeck Foto
Vera Brittain Foto
John Toland Foto
Nikos Kazantzakis Foto
 Alain Foto

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“