„the voice of beauty speaks softly; it creeps only into the most fully awakened souls“

Friedrich Nietzsche Foto
Friedrich Nietzsche746
filósofo alemán 1844 - 1900

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„Heat of passion makes our souls to chap, and the devil creeps in at the crannies.“

—  Thomas Fuller English churchman and historian 1608 - 1661
The Holy State and the Profane State (1642), Of Anger.

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Anne Brontë Foto

„My soul is awakened, my spirit is soaring and carried aloft on the wings of the breeze.“

—  Anne Brontë, libro Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell
Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell (1846), Lines Composed in a Wood on a Windy Day (1842), Context: My soul is awakened, my spirit is soaring <br/> And carried aloft on the wings of the breeze; <br/> For above and around me the wild wind is roaring, <br/> Arousing to rapture the earth and the seas. Context: My soul is awakened, my spirit is soaring And carried aloft on the wings of the breeze; For above and around me the wild wind is roaring, Arousing to rapture the earth and the seas.

Sören Kierkegaard Foto

„Father in heaven, when the thought of thee awakens in our soul“

—  Sören Kierkegaard Danish philosopher and theologian, founder of Existentialism 1813 - 1855
1840s, Context: Father in heaven, when the thought of thee awakens in our soul, let it not waken as an agitated bird which flutters confusedly about, but as a child waking from sleep with a celestial smile. Journals and Papers IIA320

Yasunari Kawabata Foto

„When we see the beauty of the snow, when we see the beauty of the full moon, when we see the beauty of the cherries in bloom, when in short we brush against and are awakened by the beauty of the four seasons, it is then that we think most of those close to us, and want them to share the pleasure.“

—  Yasunari Kawabata Japanese author, Nobel Prize winner 1899 - 1972
Japan, the Beautiful and Myself (1969), Context: Dr. Yashiro Yukio, internationally known as a scholar of Botticelli, a man of great learning in the art of the past and the present, of the East and the West, has summed up one of the special characteristics of Japanese art in a single poetic sentence: "The time of the snows, of the moon, of the blossoms — then more than ever we think of our comrades." When we see the beauty of the snow, when we see the beauty of the full moon, when we see the beauty of the cherries in bloom, when in short we brush against and are awakened by the beauty of the four seasons, it is then that we think most of those close to us, and want them to share the pleasure. The excitement of beauty calls forth strong fellow feelings, yearnings for companionship, and the word "comrade" can be taken to mean "human being". The snow, the moon, the blossoms, words expressive of the seasons as they move one into another, include in the Japanese tradition the beauty of mountains and rivers and grasses and trees, of all the myriad manifestations of nature, of human feelings as well.

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