„Whence thy learning? Hath thy toil
O'er books consumed the midnight oil?“

—  John Gay

Introduction, "The Shepherd and the Philosopher"; "Midnight oil" was a common phrase, used by Quarles, Shenstone, Cowper, Lloyd, and others.
Fables (1727)

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John Gay Foto
John Gay11
1685 - 1732

Citas similares

Horatius Bonar Foto

„Toil on, and in thy toil rejoice;
For toil comes rest, for exile, home;
Soon shalt thou hear the bridegroom's voice,
The midnight peal: "Behold, I come."“

—  Horatius Bonar British minister and poet 1808 - 1889

Fuente: Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), P. 125.

Letitia Elizabeth Landon Foto

„Spirit of the midnight dream,
What is now upon thy wing?
Earth sleeps in the moonlight beam;
O'er that sleep what wilt thou fling?“

—  Letitia Elizabeth Landon English poet and novelist 1802 - 1838

(31st March 1827) The Spirit of Dreams
The London Literary Gazette, 1827

Letitia Elizabeth Landon Foto

„I've thought upon thy brow when Night
Threw o'er my pallet her summer moonlight,
And I have looked on the midnight sky
To catch the depth and light of thy eye;
I painted from these and from memory,
For I could not paint when I looked on thee.“

—  Letitia Elizabeth Landon English poet and novelist 1802 - 1838

28th April 1824) Raphael Showing his Mistress her Portrait By Mr. Brockedon. (British Gallery.
The London Literary Gazette, 1824

John Keats Foto

„So let me be thy choir, and make a moan
Upon the midnight hours“

—  John Keats, Ode to Psyche

"Ode to Psyche", st. 3
Poems (1820)

Percy Bysshe Shelley Foto
Francis Quarles Foto

„We spend our midday sweat, our midnight oil;
We tire the night in thought, the day in toil.“

—  Francis Quarles English poet 1592 - 1644

Book II, no. 2.
Emblems (1635)

Aeschylus Foto

„Learn to know thy heart,
And, as the times, so let thy manners change,
For by the law of change a new God rules.“

—  Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound

Original: (el) Γίγνωσκε σαυτὸν καὶ μεθάρμοσαι τρόπους
νέους. νέος γὰρ καὶ τύραννος ἐν θεοῖς.
Fuente: Prometheus Bound, lines 309–310 (tr. G. M. Cookson)

Ezra Pound Foto
Richard Francis Burton Foto

„Learn from the mighty Spi'rits of old to set thy foot on Heav'en and Hell;
In Life to find thy hell and heav'en as thou abuse or use it well.“

—  Richard Francis Burton British explorer, geographer, translator, writer, soldier, orientalist, cartographer, ethnologist, spy, linguist, poe... 1821 - 1890

The Kasîdah of Hâjî Abdû El-Yezdî (1870)
Contexto: There is no Heav'en, there is no Hell; these be the dreams of baby minds,
Tools of the wily Fetisheer, to 'fright the fools his cunning blinds.
Learn from the mighty Spi'rits of old to set thy foot on Heav'en and Hell;
In Life to find thy hell and heav'en as thou abuse or use it well.

John Henry Newman Foto

„Christian! hence learn to do thy part,
And leave the rest to Heaven.“

—  John Henry Newman English cleric and cardinal 1801 - 1890

St. Paul at Melita http://www.newmanreader.org/works/verses/verse70.html, st. 3 (1833).

John Denham Foto
Thomas Fuller Foto

„Learning hath gained most by those books by which the printers have lost.“

—  Thomas Fuller English churchman and historian 1608 - 1661

Of Books.
The Holy State and the Profane State (1642)

John Lancaster Spalding Foto
Margaret Fuller Foto
James Macpherson Foto
Geoffrey Chaucer Foto

„O little booke, thou art so unconning,
How darst thou put thy-self in prees for drede?“

—  Geoffrey Chaucer English poet 1343 - 1400

The Flower and the Leaf, line 59
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

Richard Watson Gilder Foto
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Foto
Walt Whitman Foto
Ben Jonson Foto

„Thou art a monument, without a tomb,
And art alive still, while thy book doth live,
And we have wits to read, and praise to give.“

—  Ben Jonson, On Shakespeare

Fuente: To the Memory of My Beloved, the Author, Mr. William Shakespeare (1618), Lines 17 - 24; this was inspired by a eulogy by William Basse, On Shakespeare:
Contexto: Soul of the age!
The applause, delight, the wonder of our stage!
My Shakespeare, rise; I will not lodge thee by
Chaucer or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lie
A little further, to make thee a room;
Thou art a monument, without a tomb,
And art alive still, while thy book doth live,
And we have wits to read, and praise to give.

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