„The difficulties which would have to be overcome to make several of the preceding experiments conclusive are so great as to be almost insurmountable.“

Warning about the non-conclusiveness for the experimental foundation of electrostatic theory, in a footnote of the third edition of: [James Clerk Maxwell, A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, Vol.1, 3rd Edition, Oxford University Press, 1891, 37]
Quotes eat me

Obtenido de Wikiquote. Última actualización 18 de Agosto de 2021. Historia
Joseph John Thomson Foto
Joseph John Thomson4
Físico británico 1856 - 1940

Citas similares

Meher Baba Foto

„Difficulties give us the opportunity to prove our greatness by overcoming them.“

—  Meher Baba Indian mystic 1894 - 1969

Message dictated to Sanjeeva Reddy at Guruprasad (6 June 1960), as quoted in The God-Man : The Life, Journeys and Work of Meher Baba with an Interpretation of His Silence and Spiritual Teaching (1964) by Charles Benjamin Purdom, p. 353 <!-- also quoted in The Silent Master : Meher Baba, Avatar of the Age (1987), by Irwin Luck, p. 15 -->
General sources
Contexto: It is better to deny God, than to defy God.
Sometimes our weakness is considered strength, and we take delight in borrowed greatness.
To profess to be a lover of God and then to be dishonest to God, to the world and to himself, is unparalleled hypocrisy. Difficulties give us the opportunity to prove our greatness by overcoming them.

Henry Adams Foto
Immanuel Kant Foto
Henry Clay Foto
Roger Bacon Foto
John Stuart Mill Foto

„Wisdom and contrivance are shown in overcoming difficulties, so there is no place for them in a Being for whom no difficulties exist“

—  John Stuart Mill British philosopher and political economist 1806 - 1873

pages 176-177; Early Modern Texts page 16
Three Essays on Religion (posthumous publication), Theism, Part II: Attributes

George Stephenson Foto
Ludwig Wittgenstein Foto

„What has to be overcome is not difficulty of the intellect but of the will.“

—  Ludwig Wittgenstein Austrian-British philosopher 1889 - 1951

Fuente: 1930s-1951, Philosophical Occasions 1912-1951 (1993), Ch. 9 : Philosophy (chapters 86–93 of the so called Big Typescript), p. 161
Corresponding to TS 213, Kapitel 86
Contexto: What makes a subject difficult to understand — if it is significant, important — is not that some special instruction about abstruse things is necessary to understand it. Rather it is the contrast between the understanding of the subject and what most people want to see. Because of this the very things that are most obvious can become the most difficult to understand. What has to be overcome is not difficulty of the intellect but of the will. [Nicht eine Schwierigkeit des Verstandes, sondern des Willens ist zu überwinden. ]

Confucius Foto

„The man of virtue makes the difficulty to be overcome his first business, and success only a subsequent consideration.“

—  Confucius Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher -551 - -479 a.C.

Original: (zh_Hant) 仁者先難而後獲,可謂仁矣。
Variante: The man of virtue makes the difficulty to be overcome his first business, and success only a subsequent consideration: this may be called perfect virtue.
Fuente: The Analects, Other chapters

Sarada Devi Foto

„One who makes a habit of prayer will easily overcome all difficulties and remain calm and unruffled in the midst of the trials of life.“

—  Sarada Devi Hindu religious figure, spiritual consort of Ramakrishna 1853 - 1920

[Swami Aseshananda, Glimpses of a Great Soul; a Portrait of Swami Saradananda, 43]

Ernest Shackleton Foto

„Difficulties are just things to overcome after all.“

—  Ernest Shackleton Anglo-Irish polar explorer 1874 - 1922

Quoted in Shackleton (2013) by Roland Huntford https://books.google.cl/books?id=U6MNkTbRwtwC&pg=PT250&lpg=PT250&dq=Difficulties+are+just+things+to+overcome+after+all&source=bl&ots=3gWt7QcL43&sig=y5CzkBvxAdWC7MlWA3eP1eNkpDs&hl=en&sa=X&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=Difficulties%20are%20just%20things%20to%20overcome%20after%20all&f=false

Cormac McCarthy Foto
Terry Pratchett Foto
Vincent Van Gogh Foto

„It constantly remains a source of disappointment to me that my drawings are not yet what I want them to be. The difficulties are indeed numerous and great, and cannot be overcome at once.“

—  Vincent Van Gogh Dutch post-Impressionist painter (1853-1890) 1853 - 1890

In his letter to Theo, The Hague, 11 March 1883, http://www.webexhibits.org/vangogh/letter/12/274.htm?qp=art.material,as translated by Johanna van Gogh-Bonger, edited by Robert Harrison, in The Complete Letters of Vincent van Gogh (1991)
1880s, 1883
Contexto: It constantly remains a source of disappointment to me that my drawings are not yet what I want them to be. The difficulties are indeed numerous and great, and cannot be overcome at once. To make progress is a kind of miner’s work; it doesn’t advance as quickly as one would like, and as others also expect, but as one stands before such a task, the basic necessities are patience and faithfulness. In fact, I do not think much about the difficulties, because if one thought of them too much one would get stunned or disturbed.
A weaver who has to direct and to interweave a great many little threads has no time to philosophize about it, but rather he is so absorbed in his work that he doesn’t think but acts, and he feels how things must go more than he can explain it. Even though neither you nor I, in talking together, would come to any definite plans, etc., perhaps we might mutually strengthen that feeling that something is ripening within us. And that is what I should like.

Thomas Brooks Foto
Vernon L. Smith Foto
Roger Bacon Foto

„The strongest argument proves nothing so long as the conclusions are not verified by experience.“

—  Roger Bacon, libro Opus Tertium

OQHI, 43 http://www.mlat.uzh.ch/MLS/text.php?tabelle=Rogerus_Baco_cps4&rumpfid=Rogerus_Baco_cps4,%20Opus%20tertium,%20%2013&level=3&corpus=4&lang=0&current_title=Opus%20tertium&links=&inframe=1&hide_apparatus= as cited in: James J. Walsch (1911) """"Science at the Medieval Universities"""" in: Popular Science, May 1911, p. 449 http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Page:Popular_Science_Monthly_Volume_78.djvu/459
Opus Tertium, c. 1267
Original: (la) [H]aec vocatur scientia experimentalis, quae negligit argumenta, quoniam non certificant, quantumcunque sint fortia, nisi simul adsit experientia conclusionis. Et ideo haec docet experiri conclusiones nobiles omnium scientiarum, quae in aliis scientiis aut probantur per argumenta, aut investigantur per experientias naturales et imperfectas...
Contexto: The strongest argument proves nothing so long as the conclusions are not verified by experience. Experimental science is the queen of sciences, and the goal of all speculation.

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