„A house of which one knew every room wasn't worth living in.“

—  Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, libro El gatopardo

Un palazzo del quale si conoscessero tutte le stanze non era degno di essere abitato.
Page 128
Il Gattopardo (1958)

Original

Un palazzo del quale si conoscessero tutte le stanze non era degno di essere abitato.

Il Gattopardo (1958)

Obtenido de Wikiquote. Última actualización 3 de Junio de 2021. Historia

Citas similares

Cat Stevens Foto

„Love was worth sacrificing for, he thought as he left his room. Even if it wasn't yours.

-Phury's thoughts“

—  Jessica Bird, libro Lover Unbound

Variante: Love was worth sacrificing for, he thought as he left his room. Even if it wasn't yours.
Fuente: Lover Unbound

Christopher Titus Foto
Rainer Maria Rilke Foto
Hafez Foto
Thomas Jefferson Foto
James Howard Kunstler Foto
Gaston Bachelard Foto

„The mollusk's motto would be: one must live to build one's house, and not build one's house to live in.“

—  Gaston Bachelard, libro The Poetics of Space

La poétique de l'espace (The Poetics of Space) (1958)

Norman Mailer Foto
William Saroyan Foto

„One day, back there in the good old days when I was nine and the world was full of every kind of magnificence, and life was still a delightful and mysterious dream, my cousin Mourad, who was considered crazy by everybody who knew him except me, came to my house at four in the morning and woke me up by tapping on the window of my room.“

—  William Saroyan, libro My Name Is Aram

"The Summer of the Beautiful White Horse".
My Name Is Aram (1940)
Contexto: One day, back there in the good old days when I was nine and the world was full of every kind of magnificence, and life was still a delightful and mysterious dream, my cousin Mourad, who was considered crazy by everybody who knew him except me, came to my house at four in the morning and woke me up by tapping on the window of my room.
"Aram," he said.
I jumped out of bed and looked out the window.
I couldn't believe what I saw.
It wasn't morning yet, but it was summer and with daybreak not many minutes around the corner of the world it was light enough for me to know I wasn't dreaming.
My cousin Mourad was sitting on a beautiful white horse.

Herman Melville Foto

„His was the scorn which thinks it not worth the while to be scornful. Those he most scorned, never knew it.“

—  Herman Melville, libro Pierre: or, The Ambiguities

Bk. XXV, ch. 3
Pierre: or, The Ambiguities (1852)

Horace Mann Foto

„Books are the windows through which the soul looks out. A house without books is like a room without windows.“

—  Horace Mann American politician 1796 - 1859

The Duty of Owning Books (1859)
Contexto: Books are the windows through which the soul looks out. A house without books is like a room without windows. No man has a right to bring up his children without surrounding them with books, if he has the means to buy them. It is a wrong to his family. He cheats them! Children learn to read by being in the presence of books. The love of knowledge comes with reading and grows upon it.

Terry Pratchett Foto

„The sun rose slowly, as if it wasn't sure it was worth all the effort.“

—  Terry Pratchett, libro La luz fantástica

Fuente: The Light Fantastic

Meher Baba Foto
Mae West Foto

„A man in the house is worth two in the street.“

—  Mae West American actress and sex symbol 1893 - 1980

Belle of the Nineties (1934)

Marcus Aurelius Foto

„Understand however that every man is worth just so much as the things are worth about which he busies himself.“

—  Marcus Aurelius, libro Meditaciones

Fuente: Meditations (c. 121–180 AD), Book VII, 3

Bill Bryson Foto

„I knew more things in the first ten years of my life than I believe I have known at any time since. I knew everything there was to know about our house for a start. I knew what was written on the undersides of tables and what the view was like from the tops of bookcases and wardrobes. I knew what was to be found at the back of every closet, which beds had the most dust balls beneath them, which ceilings the most interesting stains, where exactly the patterns in wallpaper repeated. I knew how to cross every room in the house without touching the floor, where my father kept his spare change and how much you could safely take without his noticing (one-seventh of the quarters, one-fifth of the nickels and dimes, as many of the pennies as you could carry). I knew how to relax in an armchair in more than one hundred positions and on the floor in approximately seventy- five more. I knew what the world looked like when viewed through a Jell-O lens. I knew how things tasted—damp washcloths, pencil ferrules, coins and buttons, almost anything made of plastic that was smaller than, say, a clock radio, mucus of every variety of course—in a way that I have more or less forgotten now. I knew and could take you at once to any illustration of naked women anywhere in our house, from a Rubens painting of fleshy chubbos in Masterpieces of World Painting to a cartoon by Peter Arno in the latest issue of The New Yorker to my father’s small private library of girlie magazines in a secret place known only to him, me, and 111 of my closest friends in his bedroom.“

—  Bill Bryson American author 1951

Fuente: The Life And Times of the Thunderbolt Kid (2006), p. 36

Temas relacionados