„Nietzsche was a genius because he delighted in persecution. Karl Marx was a dangerous maniac. It is only when the feelings of discontent which he tries to explain coincide with those of a whole class, or a whole nation, that the impassioned theorist becomes a prophet, or a hero; while, if he confines himself to explaining that he would rather have been born an Emperor, they shut him up.“

Les silences du colonel Bramble (The Silence of Colonel Bramble)

André Maurois Foto
André Maurois55
escritor francés 1885 - 1967

Citas similares

Jeanette Winterson Foto
Henri Bergson Foto

„This explains the primary mission which he feels to be entrusted to him, that of an intensifier of religious faith.“

—  Henri Bergson, libro The Two Sources of Morality and Religion

Fuente: The Two Sources of Morality and Religion (1932), Chapter III : Dynamic Religion
Contexto: Religion is to mysticism what popularization is to science. What the mystic finds waiting for him, then, is a humanity which has been prepared to listen to his message by other mystics invisible and present in the religion which is actually taught. Indeed his mysticism itself is imbued with this religion, for such was its starting point. His theology will generally conform to that of the theologians. His intelligence and his imagination will use the teachings of the theologians to express in words what he experiences, and in material images what he sees spiritually. And this he can do easily, since theology has tapped that very current whose source is the mystical. Thus his mysticism is served by religion, against the day when religion becomes enriched by his mysticism. This explains the primary mission which he feels to be entrusted to him, that of an intensifier of religious faith.

Eugène Delacroix Foto
Cassandra Clare Foto
E.M. Forster Foto

„A man does not talk to himself quite truly — not even to himself: the happiness or misery that he secretly feels proceeds from causes that he cannot quite explain, because as soon as he raises them to the level of the explicable they lose their native quality.“

—  E.M. Forster, libro Aspects of the Novel

Fuente: Aspects of the Novel (1927), Chapter Five: The Plot
Contexto: A man does not talk to himself quite truly — not even to himself: the happiness or misery that he secretly feels proceeds from causes that he cannot quite explain, because as soon as he raises them to the level of the explicable they lose their native quality. The novelist has a real pull here. He can show the subconscious short-circuiting straight into action (the dramatist can do this too); he can also show it in its relation to soliloquy. He commands all the secret life, and he must not be robbed of this privilege. "How did the writer know that?" it is sometimes said. "What's his standpoint? He is not being consistent, he's shifting his point of view from the limited to the omniscient, and now he's edging back again." Questions like this have too much the atmosphere of the law courts about them.

Robert Sheckley Foto

„Kettelman bristled. Nothing got him angrier than when people implied he was paranoid. It made him feel persecuted.“

—  Robert Sheckley American writer 1928 - 2005

A Supplicant in Space (p. 60)
Short fiction, The Robot Who Looked Like Me (1978)

Nicholas Sparks Foto
David Dixon Porter Foto
Thorstein Veblen Foto
Anne Morrow Lindbergh Foto
M. C. Escher Foto
Harry Chapin Foto
George Orwell Foto
Vincent Van Gogh Foto

„A weaver who has to direct and to interweave a great many little threads has no time to philosophize about it, but rather he is so absorbed in his work that he doesn’t think but acts, and he feels how things must go more than he can explain it.“

—  Vincent Van Gogh Dutch post-Impressionist painter (1853-1890) 1853 - 1890

In his letter to Theo, The Hague, 11 March 1883, http://www.webexhibits.org/vangogh/letter/12/274.htm?qp=art.material,as translated by Johanna van Gogh-Bonger, edited by Robert Harrison, in The Complete Letters of Vincent van Gogh (1991)
1880s, 1883
Contexto: It constantly remains a source of disappointment to me that my drawings are not yet what I want them to be. The difficulties are indeed numerous and great, and cannot be overcome at once. To make progress is a kind of miner’s work; it doesn’t advance as quickly as one would like, and as others also expect, but as one stands before such a task, the basic necessities are patience and faithfulness. In fact, I do not think much about the difficulties, because if one thought of them too much one would get stunned or disturbed.
A weaver who has to direct and to interweave a great many little threads has no time to philosophize about it, but rather he is so absorbed in his work that he doesn’t think but acts, and he feels how things must go more than he can explain it. Even though neither you nor I, in talking together, would come to any definite plans, etc., perhaps we might mutually strengthen that feeling that something is ripening within us. And that is what I should like.

Confucius Foto
Abraham Lincoln Foto
Anton Chekhov Foto
Eli Siegel Foto

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“