„The question is, what is saving?“

—  Thomas Malthus, Principles of Political Economy, Principles of Political Economy (Second Edition 1836), Book I, Chapter I, Of The Definitions of Wealth and of Productive Labour, Section II, p. 40
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Thomas Malthus6
científico inglés 1766 - 1834
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„George Dillon: [I]t's easy to answer the ultimate questions – it saves you bothering with the immediate ones.“

—  John Osborne English playwright 1929 - 1994
Epitaph for George Dillon, Act II (1957) Co-written with Anthony Creighton.

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„The only saving grace of the present is that it's too damned stupid to question the past very closely.“

—  H.P. Lovecraft, libro Pickman's Model
Fiction, "Pickman's Model " - written 1926; first published in Weird Tales, Vol. 10, No. 4 (October 1927)

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„The question is—what is the question?“

—  John Archibald Wheeler American physicist 1911 - 2008
Leonard Susskind, The Black Hole War (2008), chapter 13

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„In many cultures, the customary answer is that a God or Gods created the Universe out of nothing. But if we wish to pursue this question courageously, we must of course ask the next question: where did God come from? If we decide that this is an unanswerable question, why not save a step and conclude that the origin of the Universe is an unanswerable question? Or, if we say that God always existed, why not save a step, and conclude that the Universe always existed? That there's no need for a creation, it was always here. These are not easy questions. Cosmology brings us face to face with the deepest mysteries, questions that were once treated only in religion and myth.“

—  Carl Sagan American astrophysicist, cosmologist, author and science educator 1934 - 1996
Cosmos: A Personal Voyage (1990 Update), "The Edge of Forever" [Episode 10], Context: But we don't yet know whether the Universe is open or closed. More than that, there are a few astronomers who doubt that the redshift of distant galaxies is due to the doppler effect, who are skeptical of the expanding Universe and the Big Bang. Perhaps our descendants will regard our present ignorance with as much sympathy as we feel to the ancients for not knowing the Earth went around the Sun. If the general picture, however, of a Big Bang followed by an expanding Universe is correct, what happened before that? Was the Universe devoid of all matter and then the matter suddenly somehow created, how did that happen? In many cultures, the customary answer is that a God or Gods created the Universe out of nothing. But if we wish to pursue this question courageously, we must of course ask the next question: where did God come from? If we decide that this is an unanswerable question, why not save a step and conclude that the origin of the Universe is an unanswerable question? Or, if we say that God always existed, why not save a step, and conclude that the Universe always existed? That there's no need for a creation, it was always here. These are not easy questions. Cosmology brings us face to face with the deepest mysteries, questions that were once treated only in religion and myth.

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„What is the answer?" [ I was silent ] "In that case, what is the question?“

—  Gertrude Stein American art collector and experimental writer of novels, poetry and plays 1874 - 1946
Last words (27 July 1946) as told by Alice B. Toklas in What Is Remembered (1963)

Henry David Thoreau Foto

„The question is not what you look at, but what you see.“

—  Henry David Thoreau 1817-1862 American poet, essayist, naturalist, and abolitionist 1817 - 1862

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“