„Do there exist many worlds, or is there but a single world? This is one of the most noble and exalted questions in the study of Nature.“

Attributed to Albertus Magnus in: R.C. Bless (1996) Discovering the cosmos. p. 686.

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Alberto Magno Foto
Alberto Magno3
sacerdote, obispo y Doctor de la Iglesia, teólogo, geógra... 1206 - 1280

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„I am filled with pride when I think of the noble and exalted world that must have existed before Christian doctrine caused men to look upon women with suspicion and bade them to think of angels instead.“

—  George Moore (novelist) Irish novelist, short-story writer, poet, art critic, memoirist and dramatist 1852 - 1933

Apologia Pro Scriptis Meis.
Memoirs of My Dead Life http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext05/8mmdl10.txt (1906)

Friedrich Nietzsche Foto

„There exists in the world a single path along which no one can go except you: whither does it lead? Do not ask, go along it.“

—  Friedrich Nietzsche, Untimely Meditations

Es gibt in der Welt einen einzigen Weg, auf welchem niemand gehen kann, außer dir: wohin er führt? Frage nicht, gehe ihn.
“Schopenhauer as educator,” § 3.1, R. Hollingdale, trans. (1983), p. 129
Untimely Meditations (1876)

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„One has to do good in order for it to exist in the world.“

—  Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach Austrian writer 1830 - 1916

Man muss das Gute tun, damit es in der Welt sei.
Fuente: Aphorisms (1880/1893), p. 24.

John Muir Foto

„When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.“

—  John Muir Scottish-born American naturalist and author 1838 - 1914

These are paraphrases of Muir's quote from My First Summer in the Sierra (1911) - the actual quote is listed above: "When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe." See Sierra Club explanation http://www.sierraclub.org/john_muir_exhibit/writings/misquotes.aspx.
Misattributed
Variante: Tug on anything at all and you'll find it connected to everything else in the universe.
Variante: When we tug at a single thing in nature, we find it attached to the rest of the world.

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„The whole drift of my education goes to persuade me that the world of our present consciousness is only one out of many worlds of consciousness that exist“

—  William James American philosopher, psychologist, and pragmatist 1842 - 1910

Lecture XX, "Conclusions"
1900s, The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902)
Contexto: This thoroughly 'pragmatic' view of religion has usually been taken as a matter of course by common men. They have interpolated divine miracles into the field of nature, they have built a heaven out beyond the grave. It is only transcendentalist metaphysicians who think that, without adding any concrete details to Nature, or subtracting any, but by simply calling it the expression of absolute spirit, you make it more divine just as it stands. I believe the pragmatic way of taking religion to be the deeper way. It gives it body as well as soul, it makes it claim, as everything real must claim, some characteristic realm of fact as its very own. What the more characteristically divine facts are, apart from the actual inflow of energy in the faith-state and the prayer-state, I know not. But the over-belief on which I am ready to make my personal venture is that they exist. The whole drift of my education goes to persuade me that the world of our present consciousness is only one out of many worlds of consciousness that exist, and that those other worlds must contain experiences which have a meaning for our life also; and that although in the main their experiences and those of this world keep discrete, yet the two become continuous at certain points, and higher energies filter in. By being faithful in my poor measure to this over-belief, I seem to myself to keep more sane and true. I can, of course, put myself into the sectarian scientist's attitude, and imagine vividly that the world of sensations and scientific laws and objects may be all. But whenever I do this, I hear that inward monitor of which W. K. Clifford once wrote, whispering the word 'bosh!' Humbug is humbug, even though it bear the scientific name, and the total expression of human experience, as I view it objectively, invincibly urges me beyond the narrow 'scientific' bounds. Assuredly, the real world is of a different temperament — more intricately built than physical science allows. So my objective and my subjective conscience both hold me to the over-belief which I express. Who knows whether the faithfulness of individuals here below to their own poor over-beliefs may not actually help God in turn to be more effectively faithful to his own greater tasks?

„Of what meaning is the world without mind? The question cannot exist.“

—  Edwin H. Land American scientist and inventor 1909 - 1991

Address to the Society of Photographic Scientists and Engineers, Los Angeles, California (5 May 1977), published Harvard Magazine (January-February 1978), pp. 23–26 <!-- , and in Zygon Vol. 16, No. 1, (1981) p. 7 - 13 -->
Contexto: Ordinarily when we talk about the human as the advanced product of evolution and the mind as being the most advanced product of evolution, there is an implication that we are advanced out of and away from the structure of the exterior world in which we have evolved, as if a separate product had been packaged, wrapped up, and delivered from a production line. The view I am presenting proposes a mechanism more and more interlocked with the totality of the exterior. This mechanism has no separate existence at all, being in a thousand ways united with and continuously interacting with the whole exterior domain. In fact there is no exterior red object with a tremendous mind linked to it by only a ray of light. The red object is a composite product of matter and mechanism evolved in permanent association with a most elaborate interlock. There is no tremor in what we call the "outside world" that is not locked by a thousand chains and gossamers to inner structures that vibrate and move with it and are a part of it.
The reason for the painfulness of all philosophy is that in the past, in its necessary ignorance of the unbelievable domains of partnership that have evolved in the relationship between ourselves and the world around us, it dealt with what indeed have been a tragic separation and isolation. Of what meaning is the world without mind? The question cannot exist.

Ingmar Bergman Foto

„For me, in those days, the great question was: Does God exist? Or doesn't God exist? Can we, by an attitude of faith, attain to a sense of community and a better world? Or, if God doesn't exist, what do we do then? What does our world look like then? In none of this was there the least political colour.“

—  Ingmar Bergman Swedish filmmaker 1918 - 2007

Stig Bjorkman interview <!-- pages 12-14 -->
Contexto: That I wasn't interested in politics or social matters, that's dead right. I was utterly indifferent. After the war and the discovery of the concentration camps, and with the collapse of political collaborations between the Russians and the Americans, I just contracted out. My involvement became religious. I went in for a psychological, religious line... the salvation-damnation issue, for me, was never political. It was religious. For me, in those days, the great question was: Does God exist? Or doesn't God exist? Can we, by an attitude of faith, attain to a sense of community and a better world? Or, if God doesn't exist, what do we do then? What does our world look like then? In none of this was there the least political colour. My revolt against bourgeois society was a revolt-against-the-father. I was a peripheral fellow, regarded with deep suspicion from every quarter... When I arrived in Gothenburg after the war, the actors at the Municipal Theatre fell into distinct groups: old ex-Nazis, Jews, and anti-Nazis. Politically speaking, there was dynamite in that company: but Torsten Hammaren, the head of the theatre, held it together in his iron grasp.

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„I am not saying that gas chambers did not exist. I did not see them myself. I haven't studied the questions specially. But I believe it is a minor point in the history of the Second World War.“

—  Jean-Marie Le Pen French right-wing and nationalist politician 1928

Controversial statement on the Holocaust (13 September 1987), in which he referred to the Nazi gas chambers as a "minor point" [point de detail] in the history of the Second World War, as quoted in Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science (1993) http://books.google.com/books?id=b8IvAAAAYAAJ&q=%22But+I+believe+that+it+is+a+minor+point

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