„The universe was a language with a perfectly ambiguous grammar. Every physical event was an utterance that could be parsed in two entirely different ways, one causal and the other teleological.“

—  Ted Chiang, Story of Your Life; first appeared in Starlight 2, 1998.
Ted Chiang Foto
Ted Chiang3
Escritor de ciencia ficción estadounidense 1967
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Citas similares

„What in the whole denotes a causal equilibrium process, appears for the part as a teleological event.“

—  Ludwig von Bertalanffy austrian biologist and philosopher 1901 - 1972
Bertalanffy (1929, p. 306) cited in: Cliff Hooker ed. (2011) Philosophy of Complex Systems. p. 190

Guity Novin Foto
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Judea Pearl Foto
Hans Reichenbach Foto
Buckminster Fuller Foto
Noam Chomsky Foto
David Crystal Foto
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Philip K. Dick Foto
Howard Zinn Foto

„The white population could not possibly be unaffected by those events — some whites more stubborn in their defense of segregation, but others beginning to think in different ways.“

—  Howard Zinn author and historian 1922 - 2010
Context: The white population could not possibly be unaffected by those events — some whites more stubborn in their defense of segregation, but others beginning to think in different ways. And the black population was transformed, having risen up in mass action for the first time, feeling its power, knowing now that if the old order could be shaken it could be toppled. You Can't Be Neutral on A Moving Train (1994) Ch. 4: "My Name is Freedom": Albany, Georgia

Richard Whately Foto
James Joyce Foto

„One great part of every human existence is passed in a state which cannot be rendered sensible by the use of wideawake language, cutanddry grammar and goahead plot.“

—  James Joyce Irish novelist and poet 1882 - 1941
Referring to Finnegans Wake in a letter to Harriet Shaw Weaver (24 November 1926)

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Georges Clemenceau Foto

„There are only two perfectly useless things in this world. One is an appendix and the other is Poincaré.“

—  Georges Clemenceau French politician 1841 - 1929
Context: There are only two perfectly useless things in this world. One is an appendix and the other is Poincaré. Referring to his rival Raymond Poincaré, as quoted in Paris 1919 : Six Months That Changed the World (2003) by Margaret MacMillan, p. 33

Nicole Hollander Foto
C.G. Jung Foto

„We Shall Naturally look round in vain the macrophysical world for acausal events, for the simple reason that we cannot imagine events that are connected non-causally and are capable of a non-causal explanation. But that does not mean that such events do not exist.“

—  C.G. Jung Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist who founded analytical psychology 1875 - 1961
Context: We Shall Naturally look round in vain the macrophysical world for acausal events, for the simple reason that we cannot imagine events that are connected non-causally and are capable of a non-causal explanation. But that does not mean that such events do not exist... The so-called "scientific view of the world" based on this can hardly be anything more than a psychologically biased partial view which misses out all those by no means unimportant aspects that cannot be grasped statistically. p. 5

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