„Once causes are determined, then there is talk of "social injustice" and the privileged begin to resist.“

—  Gustavo Gutiérrez Merino, Introduction: Expanding The View, p. xxiv
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Mikhail Bakunin Foto

„We are convinced that liberty without socialism is privilege, injustice; and that socialism without liberty is slavery and brutality.“

—  Mikhail Bakunin Russian revolutionary, philosopher, and theorist of collectivist anarchism 1814 - 1876
"Federalism, Socialism, Anti-Theologism" http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/bakunin/works/various/reasons-of-state.htm, presented by Bakunin as a Reasoned Proposal to the Central Committee of the League for Peace and Freedom, at the League's first congress held in Geneva (September 1867). Variant translation: We are convinced that freedom without Socialism is privilege and injustice, and that Socialism without freedom is slavery and brutality. As quoted in The Political Philosophy of Bakunin: Scientific Anarchism (1953) edited by Grigoriĭ Petrovich Maksimov, p. 269

Kenneth N. Waltz Foto

„Once socialism replaces capitalism, reason will determine the policies of states.“

—  Kenneth N. Waltz American political scientist and international relations theoretician 1924 - 2013
Chapter V, Some Implications Of The Second Image, p. 150

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Thomas Jefferson Foto

„When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes duty.“

—  Thomas Jefferson 3rd President of the United States of America 1743 - 1826

Michael Bloomberg Foto

„We’re paying more for the privilege of getting sick and dying early. Once again, it makes no sense. And once again, no one in Washington is talking about how to fix it.“

—  Michael Bloomberg American businessman and politician, former mayor of New York City 1942
http://mikebloomberg.com/en/issues/public_health/mayor_bloomberg_delivers_opening_address_at_ceasefire_bridging_the_political_divide_conference

Francis Escudero Foto
George Henry Lewes Foto

„Literature is at once the cause and the effect of social progress. It deepens our natural sensibilities, and strengthens by exercise our intellectual capacities.“

—  George Henry Lewes British philosopher 1817 - 1878
Context: Literature is at once the cause and the effect of social progress. It deepens our natural sensibilities, and strengthens by exercise our intellectual capacities. It stores up the accumulated experience of the race, connecting Past and Present into a conscious unity; and with this store it feeds successive generations, to be fed in turn by them. As its importance emerges into more general recognition, it necessarily draws after it a larger crowd of servitors, filling noble minds with a noble ambition.

James Boswell Foto
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André Gide Foto
Simone Weil Foto
Mark Ames Foto

„Once you start seeing injustice in one place, it's like taking off blinders- you start to see injustice everywhere, and how it is all connected.“

—  Mark Ames American writer and journalist 1965
Context: Just as the American colonials' consciousness expanded from rebelling against unfair taxation in the 1760s to wide noble revolutionary goals touching on the inherent rights of mankind, so the Whiskey Rebellion guerrillas took on broader themes as injustice increasingly framed their consciousness. Once you start seeing injustice in one place, it's like taking off blinders- you start to see injustice everywhere, and how it is all connected. Part II: The Banality of Slavery, page 65.

Charles Lamb Foto
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Carl Sagan Foto

„All that brave Athenian talk about democracy applied only to a privileged few.“

—  Carl Sagan American astrophysicist, cosmologist, author and science educator 1934 - 1996
Context: But why had science lost its way in the first place? What appeal could these teachings of Pythagoras and Plato have had for their contemporaries? They provided, I believe, an intellectually respectable justification for a corrupt social order. The mercantile tradition that had led to Ionian science also led to a slave economy. You could get richer if you owned a lot of slaves. Athens in the time of Plato and Aristotle had a vast slave population. All that brave Athenian talk about democracy applied only to a privileged few. 40 min 35 sec

„A great book begins with an idea; a great life, with a determination.“

—  Louis L'Amour Novelist, short story writer 1908 - 1988
Context: A great book begins with an idea; a great life, with a determination. My life may not be great to others, but to me it has been one of steady progression, never dull, often exciting, often hungry, tired, and lonely, but always learning. Somewhere back down the years I decided, or my nature decided for me, that I would be a teller of stories. Decisions had to be made and there was nobody but me to make them. My course altered a number of times but never deviated from the destination I had decided upon. Whether this was altogether a matter of choice I do not know. Perhaps my early reading and the storytelling at home had preconditioned me for the role I adopted. Somewhere along the line I had fallen in love with learning, and it became a lifelong romance. Early on I discovered it was fun to follow along the byways of history to find those treasures that await any searcher. It may be that all later decisions followed naturally from that first one. One thing has always been true: That book or that person who can give me an idea or a new slant on an old idea is my friend. Ch. 1

Max Horkheimer Foto

„Answers determined by the social division of labor become truth as such.“

—  Max Horkheimer German philosopher and sociologist 1895 - 1973
p. 50: Describing the pragmatist view

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