„I would not open windows into men's souls.“

—  Isabel I, Oral tradition, possibly originating in a letter drafted for her by Francis Bacon. http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=nkJad0EYVxIC&pg=PA104#v=onepage&q&f=false http://books.google.co,/books?id=0yA-MQLwOtEC&pg=PA104#v=onepage&q&f=false
Isabel I Foto
Isabel I
reina de Inglaterra 1533 - 1603
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John Greenleaf Whittier Foto

„The windows of my soul I throw
Wide open to the sun.“

—  John Greenleaf Whittier American Quaker poet and advocate of the abolition of slavery 1807 - 1892
My Psalm, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

Marcus Aurelius Foto
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Guillaume de Salluste Du Bartas Foto

„These lovely lamps, these windows of the soul.“

—  Guillaume de Salluste Du Bartas French writer 1544 - 1590
First Week, Sixth Day. Compare: "Ere I let fall the windows of mine eyes", William Shakespeare, Richard III, act v. sc. 3.

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Antonin Artaud Foto
Khaled Hosseini Foto
George H. W. Bush Foto
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Isaac Leib Peretz Foto
Horace Mann Foto

„Books are the windows through which the soul looks out. A house without books is like a room without windows.“

—  Horace Mann American politician 1796 - 1859
Context: Books are the windows through which the soul looks out. A house without books is like a room without windows. No man has a right to bring up his children without surrounding them with books, if he has the means to buy them. It is a wrong to his family. He cheats them! Children learn to read by being in the presence of books. The love of knowledge comes with reading and grows upon it.

Vasily Chuikov Foto

„I would not have believed such an inferno could open up on earth. Men died but they did not retreat.“

—  Vasily Chuikov Soviet military commander 1900 - 1982
Quoted in "Europe in Our Time, 1914 to the Present" - Page 571 - by Robert Reinhold Ergang - Europe - 1953

 Maimónides Foto

„This book will then be a key admitting to places the gates of which would otherwise be closed. When the gates are opened and men enter, their souls will enjoy repose, their eyes will be gratified, and even their bodies, after all toil and labour, will be refreshed.“

—  Maimónides rabbi, physician, philosopher 1135 - 1204
Context: Having concluded these introductory remarks I proceed to examine those expressions, to the true meaning of which, as apparent from the context, it is necessary to direct your attention. This book will then be a key admitting to places the gates of which would otherwise be closed. When the gates are opened and men enter, their souls will enjoy repose, their eyes will be gratified, and even their bodies, after all toil and labour, will be refreshed.

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William Shakespeare Foto
Laurell K. Hamilton Foto
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George Henry Lewes Foto

„It is impossible to deny that dishonest men often grow rich and famous, becoming powerful in their parish or in parliament. Their portraits simper from shop windows; and they live and die respected. This success is theirs; yet it is not the success which a noble soul will envy.“

—  George Henry Lewes British philosopher 1817 - 1878
Context: It is impossible to deny that dishonest men often grow rich and famous, becoming powerful in their parish or in parliament. Their portraits simper from shop windows; and they live and die respected. This success is theirs; yet it is not the success which a noble soul will envy. Apart from the risk of discovery and infamy, there is the certainty of a conscience ill at ease, or if at ease, so blunted in its sensibilities, so given over to lower lusts, that a healthy instinct recoils from such a state. Observe, moreover, that in Literature the possible rewards of dishonesty are small, and the probability of detection great. In Life a dishonest man is chiefly moved by desires towards some tangible result of money or power; if he get these he has got all. The man of letters has a higher aim: the very object of his toil is to secure the sympathy and respect of men; and the rewards of his toil may be paid in money, fame, or consciousness of earnest effort. The first of these may sometimes be gained without Sincerity. Fame may also, for a time, be erected on an unstable ground, though it will inevitably be destroyed again. But the last and not least reward is to be gained by every one without fear of failure, without risk of change. Sincere work is good work, be it never so humble; and sincere work is not only an indestructible delight to the worker by its very genuineness, but is immortal in the best sense, for it lives for ever in its influence. There is no good Dictionary, not even a good Index, that is not in this sense priceless, for it has honestly furthered the work of the world, saving labour to others, setting an example to successors.

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