„The ancient covenant is in pieces; man knows at last that he is alone in the universe's unfeeling immensity, out of which he emerged only by chance. His destiny is nowhere spelled out, nor is his duty. The kingdom above or the darkness below: it is for him to choose.“

Monod (1971) Chance and necessity: an essay on the natural philosophy of modern biology. p. 180

Obtenido de Wikiquote. Última actualización 3 de Junio de 2021. Historia
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Jacques Monod7
Bioquímico francés 1910 - 1976

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