„Most prayers have nothing in common with petitions.“

In Search of the Miraculous (1949)
Contexto: When we speak of prayer or of the results of prayer we always imply only one kind of prayer — petition, or we think that petition can be united with all other kinds of prayers.… Most prayers have nothing in common with petitions. I speak of ancient prayers; many of them are much older than Christianity. These prayers are, so to speak, recapitulations; by repeating them aloud or to himself a man endeavors to experience what is in them, their whole content, with his mind and his feeling.

Obtenido de Wikiquote. Última actualización 3 de Junio de 2021. Historia
George Gurdjieff Foto
George Gurdjieff13
filósofo, compositor, escritor y maestro espiritual armenio 1866 - 1949

Citas similares

„Prayer is petition, intercession, adoration, and contemplation; great saints and mystics have agreed on this definition. To stop short at petition is to pray only in a crippled fashion.“

—  Robertson Davies, libro A Voice from the Attic

A Voice from the Attic (1960)
Contexto: Prayer is petition, intercession, adoration, and contemplation; great saints and mystics have agreed on this definition. To stop short at petition is to pray only in a crippled fashion. Further, such prayer encourages one of the faults which is most reprehended by spiritual instructors — turning to God without turning from Self.

Bill Hybels Foto

„The most common cause of unanswered prayer is prayerlessness.“

—  Bill Hybels American writer 1951

Too Busy Not to Pray (2008, InterVarsity Press)

Jonathan Edwards Foto
William James Foto
Richard Wagner Foto

„There we see nothing but a clash of interests, whose object is common to all the disputants, common and ignoble: plainly the side most strongly organised, i.e. the most unscrupulous, will bear away the prize.“

—  Richard Wagner German composer, conductor 1813 - 1883

Know Thyself (1881)
Contexto: What "Conservatives," "Liberals" and "Conservative-liberals," and finally "Democrats," "Socialists," or even "Social-democrats" etc., have lately uttered on the Jewish Question, must seem to us a trifle foolish; for none of these parties would think of testing that "Know thyself" upon themselves, not even the most indefinite and therefore the only one that styles itself in German, the "Progress"-party. There we see nothing but a clash of interests, whose object is common to all the disputants, common and ignoble: plainly the side most strongly organised, i. e. the most unscrupulous, will bear away the prize. With all our comprehensive State- and National-Economy, it would seem that we are victims to a dream now flattering, now terrifying, and finally asphyxiating: all are panting to awake therefrom; but it is the dream's peculiarity that, so long as it enmeshes us, we take it for real life, and fight against our wakening as though we fought with death. At last one crowning horror gives the tortured wretch the needful strength: he wakes, and what he held most real was but a figment of the dæmon of distraught mankind.
We who belong to none of all those parties, but seek our welfare solely in man's wakening to his simple hallowed dignity; we who are excluded from these parties as useless persons, and yet are sympathetically troubled for them, — we can only stand and watch the spasms of the dreamer, since no cry of ours can pierce to him. So let us save and tend and brace our best of forces, to bear a noble cordial to the sleeper when he wakes, as of himself he must at last.

Jacob M. Appel Foto

„Most people are far more concerned that they can control their own bodies than they are about petitioning Congress.“

—  Jacob M. Appel American author, bioethicist, physician, lawyer and social critic 1973

"A Culture of Liberty" http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jacob-m-appel/a-culture-of-liberty_b_242402.html, The Huffington Post (2009-07-21)

Woodrow Wilson Foto
Florence Nightingale Foto

„In it and in the other prayers of the Mystics there is scarcely a petition. There is never a word of the theory that God's dealings with us are to show His "power"; still less of the theory that "of His own good pleasure" He has " predestined" any souls to eternal damnation.“

—  Florence Nightingale English social reformer and statistician, and the founder of modern nursing 1820 - 1910

Notes from Devotional Authors of the Middle Ages (1873-1874)
Contexto: These old Mystics whom we call superstitious were far before us in their ideas of God and of prayer (that is of our communion with God). "Prayer," says a mystic of the 16th century, "is to ask not what we wish of God, but what God wishes of us." "Master who hast made and formed the vessel of the body of Thy creature, and hast put within so great a treasure, the Soul, which bears the image of Thee": so begins a dying prayer of the 14th century. In it and in the other prayers of the Mystics there is scarcely a petition. There is never a word of the theory that God's dealings with us are to show His "power"; still less of the theory that "of His own good pleasure" He has " predestined" any souls to eternal damnation. There is little mention of heaven for self; of desire of happiness for self, none. It is singular how little mention there is either of "intercession " or of " Atonement by Another's merits." True it is that we can only create a heaven for ourselves and others "by the merits of Another," since it is only by working in accordance with God's Laws that we can do anything. But there is nothing at all in these prayers as if God's anger had to be bought off, as if He had to be bribed into giving us heaven by sufferings merely "to satisfy God's justice." In the dying prayers, there is nothing of the "egotism of death." It is the reformation of God's church—that is, God's children, for whom the self would give itself, that occupies the dying thoughts. There is not often a desire to be released from trouble and suffering. On the contrary, there is often a desire to suffer the greatest suffering, and to offer the greatest offering, with even greater pain, if so any work can be done. And still, this, and all, is ascribed to God's goodness. The offering is not to buy anything by suffering, but — If only the suppliant can do anything for God's children!
These suppliants did not live to see the " reformation" of God's children. No more will any who now offer these prayers. But at least we can all work towards such practical " reformation." The way to live with God is to live with Ideas — not merely to think about ideals, but to do and suffer for them. Those who have to work on men and women must above all things have their Spiritual Ideal, their purpose, ever present. The "mystical " state is the essence of common sense.

Georges Braque Foto

„Whatever is in common is true; but likeness is false. Trouillebert's work bears a likeness to that of Corot, but they have nothing in common.“

—  Georges Braque French painter and sculptor 1882 - 1963

Braque admired Corot and frequently used Corot's young country-ladies as models, for instance in his painting 'Souvenirs de Corot' he made in 1922/23
Fuente: 1921 - 1945, p. 96 - quote of Braque from 'Cahiers d'art', No. 10, 1935, ed. Christian Zervos - quote of Braque is referring to Corot's impact on his painting art

Narada Maha Thera Foto
John Holt (Lord Chief Justice) Foto

„We take notice of all feasts, and the almanack is part of the common law, the calendar being established by Act of Parliament, and it is published before the Common-prayer Book.“

—  John Holt (Lord Chief Justice) English lawyer and Lord Chief Justice of England 1642 - 1710

Brough v. Parkings (1703), 2 Raym. 994; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 92.

Thomas Brooks Foto
Milan Kundera Foto
Bill Hybels Foto

„Confession is probably the most neglected area of personal prayer.“

—  Bill Hybels American writer 1951

Too Busy Not to Pray (2008, InterVarsity Press)

John C. Maxwell Foto
Alfred Denning, Baron Denning Foto
Pope Leo X Foto
Elizabeth Gilbert Foto
Kenzaburō Ōe Foto

„To talk of prayer after admitting he professed no faith was, in my opinion, a breach of common courtesy.“

—  Kenzaburō Ōe Japanese author 1935

p 13
Shizuka-na seikatsu (A Quiet Life) (1990)
Contexto: To talk of prayer after admitting he professed no faith was, in my opinion, a breach of common courtesy. In this sense, he did make a social blunder, for which I think he well deserved some minor castigation.

Temas relacionados