„Socrates’ words, “Know thyself” remain for all those who seek true knowledge and being.“

All and Everything: Views from the Real World (1973)
Contexto: There do exist enquiring minds, which long for the truth of the heart, seek it, strive to solve the problems set by life, try to penetrate to the essence of things and phenomena and to penetrate into themselves. If a man reasons and thinks soundly, no matter which path he follows in solving these problems, he must inevitably arrive back at himself, and begin with the solution of the problem of what he is himself and what his place is in the world around him. For without this knowledge, he will have no focal point in his search. Socrates’ words, “Know thyself” remain for all those who seek true knowledge and being.

Obtenido de Wikiquote. Última actualización 3 de Junio de 2021. Historia
George Gurdjieff Foto
George Gurdjieff13
filósofo, compositor, escritor y maestro espiritual armenio 1866 - 1949

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„Socrates gave no diplomas or degrees, and would have subjected any disciple who demanded one to a disconcerting catechism on the nature of true knowledge.“

—  George Macaulay Trevelyan Historian 1876 - 1962

History of England http://books.google.com/books?id=6hUTAQAAIAAJ&q="Socrates+gave+no+diplomas+or+degrees+and+would+have+subjected+any+disciple+who+demanded+one+to+a+disconcerting+catechism+on+the+nature+of+true+knowledge" (1960).

Maimónides Foto

„Those who seek the truth, and admit what is true, must believe that nothing is hidden from God; that everything is revealed to His knowledge, which is identical with His essence; that this kind of knowledge cannot be comprehended by us“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed

Fuente: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.21
Contexto: He fully knows His unchangeable essence, and has thus a knowledge of all that results from any of His acts. If we were to try to understand in what manner this is done, it would be the same as if we tried to be the same as God, and to make our knowledge identical with His knowledge. Those who seek the truth, and admit what is true, must believe that nothing is hidden from God; that everything is revealed to His knowledge, which is identical with His essence; that this kind of knowledge cannot be comprehended by us; for if we knew its method, we would possess that intellect by which such knowledge could be acquired.... Note this well, for I think that this is an excellent idea, and leads to correct views; no error will be found in it; no dialectical argument; it does not lead to any absurd conclusion, nor to ascribing any defect to God. These sublime and profound themes admit of no proof whatever... In all questions that cannot be demonstrated, we must adopt the method which we have adopted in this question about God's Omniscience. Note it.

Robert Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Earl of Lytton Foto

„Only by knowledge of that which is not thyself, shall thyself be learned.“

—  Robert Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Earl of Lytton English statesman and poet 1831 - 1891

"Γνωθι Σεαυτον" ("Know Thyself"), in The Poetical Works of Owen Meredith (1867), Vol. I, p. 247.

„If it's knowledge and wisdom you want, then seek out the company of those who do real work for an honest purpose.“

—  Edward Abbey American author and essayist 1927 - 1989

Fuente: Postcards from Ed: Dispatches and Salvos from an American Iconoclast

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„As soon as he had acquired a true knowledge of God, he confessed that there is undoubtedly true felicity in the knowledge of God; it is attained by all who acquire that knowledge, and no earthly trouble can disturb it.“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed

Fuente: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.23
Contexto: The words of God are justified, as I will show, by the fact that Job abandoned his first very erroneous opinion, and himself proved that it was an error. It is the opinion which suggests itself as plausible at first thought, especially in the minds of those who meet with mishap, well knowing that they have not merited them through sins. This is admitted by all, and therefore this opinion was assigned to Job. But he is represented to hold this view only so long as he was without wisdom, and knew God only by tradition, in the same manner as religious people generally know Him. As soon as he had acquired a true knowledge of God, he confessed that there is undoubtedly true felicity in the knowledge of God; it is attained by all who acquire that knowledge, and no earthly trouble can disturb it. So long as Job's knowledge of God was based on tradition and communication, and not on research, he believed that such imaginary good as is possessed in health, riches, and children, was the utmost that men can attain; this was the reason why he was in perplexity, and why he uttered the... opinions, and this is also the meaning of his words: "I have heard of thee by the hearing of the ear; but now mine eye seeth thee. Wherefore I abhor myself, and repent because of dust and ashes" (xlii. 5, 6); that is to say, he abhorred all that he had desired before, and that he was sorry that he had been in dust and ashes; comp. "and he sat down among the ashes" (ii. 8) On account of this last utterance, which implies true perception, it is said afterwards in reference to him, "for you have not spoken of me the thing that is right, as my servant Job hath."

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