„Pleasure and distress, fear and courage, desire and aversion, where have these affections and experiences their seat?“

—  Plotino, Context: Pleasure and distress, fear and courage, desire and aversion, where have these affections and experiences their seat? Clearly, either in the Soul alone, or in the Soul as employing the body, or in some third entity deriving from both. And for this third entity, again, there are two possible modes: it might be either a blend or a distinct form due to the blending. First Tractate : The Animate and the Man, §1
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