„It isn’t what he says that counts as a work of art, it’s what he makes, with such intensity of perception that it lives with an intrinsic movement of its own to verify its authenticity.“

Introduction
The Wedge (1944)
Contexto: When a man makes a poem, makes it, mind you, he takes words as he finds them interrelated about him and composes them — without distortion which would mar their exact significances — into an intense expression of his perceptions and ardors that they may constitute a revelation in the speech that he uses. It isn’t what he says that counts as a work of art, it’s what he makes, with such intensity of perception that it lives with an intrinsic movement of its own to verify its authenticity.

William Carlos Williams Foto
William Carlos Williams2
poeta estadounidense 1883 - 1963

Citas similares

Lorin Morgan-Richards Foto

„It's mad isn’t it. I guess I just wanted to make something that people would cherish and hope to hold on to for a while. The goal is to make each book a unique work of art, with an intrinsic quality all their own.“

—  Lorin Morgan-Richards American poet, cartoonist, and children's writer 1975

Regarding choosing to bookbind each of his books by hand rather than choosing to have them mass produced; as quoted in "The Caffiene Induced World of Brian A Kenny" https://thecaffieneinducedworldofbrianakenny.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/the-raven-speaks-insight-with-lorin-morgan-richards/ The Raven Speaks: Insight with Lorin Morgan-Richards by Brian A. Kenny (6 December 2012).

Niklas Luhmann Foto

„The art system operates on its own terms, but an observer of art can choose many different distinctions to indicate what he observes.“

—  Niklas Luhmann German sociologist, administration expert, and social systems theorist 1927 - 1998

Fuente: Art As a Social System (2000), p. 102.

Brandon Sanderson Foto
John Keats Foto

„The excellence of every Art is its intensity.“

—  John Keats English Romantic poet 1795 - 1821

Fuente: Complete Poems and Selected Letters

Robert Pinsky Foto

„Each work of art generate its own rules“

—  Robert Pinsky American poet, editor, literary critic, academic. 1940

Singing School

Walter Benjamin Foto
Patrick Swift Foto

„Each work of art is a complete entity existing in its own right and by its own particular logic.“

—  Patrick Swift British artist 1927 - 1983

Nano Reid (1950)
Contexto: Each work of art is a complete entity existing in its own right and by its own particular logic. It has its own reality and is independent of any particular creed or theory as a justification for its existence. This is not to say that artistic development may be considered as a self-sufficient process unrelated to social reality, because art is always concerned with the deeper and fundamentally human things; and any consideration of art is a consideration of humanity. But it does mean that we cannot apply the principles and logic of the past to a new work of art and hope to understand it. The eternal verities with which the artist is concerned do not change, but our conception of art does, as does our conception of form, and these must be extended if we are to understand fully and basically the meaning of a new work. It is a complex matter, but the elemental principles are always simple. The mass of modern art theory that developed around the fantastic changes of this century's painting can be largely ignored; only one or two fundamental principles are important. Probably most important in the new aesthetics from the painter's point of view was the statement of Degas, seventy years ago, in his unheeded advice to the Impressionists. He spoke then of a "Transformation in which imagination collaborates with memory... It is very well to copy what one sees; it is much better to draw what one has retained in one's memory”…This attitude, and all it implies, underlines the work of practically every painter of importance since 1900. Ultimately, it meant that the day of stage props and models was gone, and that imagination was recognised as the most important quality in an artist.

John Keats Foto
Arnold Schoenberg Foto
James Macpherson Foto
Eckhart Tolle Foto
Annie Dillard Foto
William Moulton Marston Foto
Franz Kafka Foto
Herbert Read Foto

„Art differs from nature not in its organic form, but in its human origins: in the fact that it is not God or a machine that makes a work of art, but an individual“

—  Herbert Read English anarchist, poet, and critic of literature and art 1893 - 1968

The Origins of Art (1966)
Other Quotes
Contexto: What I am searching for... is some formula that would combine individual initiative with universal values, and that combination would give us a truly organic form. Form, which we discover in nature by analysis, is obstinately mathematical in its manifestations—which is to say that creation in art requires thought and deliberation. But this is not to say that form can be reduced to a formula. In every work of art it must be re-created, but that too is true of every work of nature. Art differs from nature not in its organic form, but in its human origins: in the fact that it is not God or a machine that makes a work of art, but an individual with his instincts and intuitions, with his sensibility and his mind, searching relentlessly for the perfection that is neither in mind nor in nature, but in the unknown. I do not mean this in an other-worldly sense, only that the form of the flower is unknown to the seed.

Paula Modersohn-Becker Foto

„The intensity with which a subject is grasped (still life's, portraits, or creations of the imagination) – that is what makes for beauty in art.“

—  Paula Modersohn-Becker German artist 1876 - 1907

excerpt of her Journal, Worpswede 1899; as quoted in Voicing our visions, – Writings by women artists; ed. Mara R. Witzling, Universe New York, 1991, p. 198
1899

Paula Modersohn-Becker Foto

„Last year I wrote: 'the intensity with which a subject is grasped, that is what makes for beauty in art'. Isn't it also true for love?“

—  Paula Modersohn-Becker German artist 1876 - 1907

excerpt of her Journal, Worpswede 1899; as quoted in Voicing our visions, – Writings by women artists; ed. Mara R. Witzling, Universe New York, 1991
1899

Cy Twombly Foto

„Each line is now the actual experience with its own innate history. It does not illustrate — it is the sensation of its own realization. [a written art note by Twombly on a painting he created in 1957].“

—  Cy Twombly American painter 1928 - 2011

Quote of Twombly in 'Writings', Flash Art International, Laura Cherubini, October 2008 (translation from Italian: Beatrice Barbareschi)
1950 - 1960

Edvard Munch Foto

„What is art really? The outcome of dissatisfaction with life, the point of impact for the creative force, the continual movement of life.... in my art I attempt to explain life and its meaning to myself.“

—  Edvard Munch Norwegian painter and printmaker 1863 - 1944

N 45, as quoted in Edvard Much – behind the scream, Sue Prideaux; Yale University Press, New Haven and London, 2007, p. 35
after 1930

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“