„Our road not marked on maps.
Fugitives of the centuries,
our origin is the breathing
and our destination is exhalation,
A thousand suns are flowing in our blood,
and the vision of infinity is always chasing us.
The form cannot tame us,
Our days are a fire and our nights a sea.“

Fuente: https://hellopoetry.com/alexis-karpouzos/

Editado por Alexis karpouzos. Última actualización 3 de Junio de 2021. Historia

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