„Nothing in life produce a more powerful joy than a near miss by the Angel of Death.“

—  Charles Sheffield, libro Convergence

Fuente: The Heritage Universe, Convergence (1997), Chapter 26 (p. 516)

Obtenido de Wikiquote. Última actualización 14 de Octubre de 2021. Historia
Charles Sheffield Foto
Charles Sheffield2
1935 - 2002

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H. Jackson Brown, Jr. Foto
Henry Mills Alden Foto

„The Angel of Death is the invisible Angel of Life.“

—  Henry Mills Alden American magazine editor 1836 - 1919

A Study of Death (1895), reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).

Alain de Botton Foto

„Life is near-death experience.“

—  Alain de Botton Swiss writer 1969

As quoted in de Botton's School of Life lecture, 'On Pessimism' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aw1oLtuJOXQ,
[transcript] https://docs.google.com/document/d/1BcpQlEBiGT6sYmMY8wz0F1rqoWjfC6J-40vhHQZFxxY/edit?pli=1

Muhammad al-Taqi Foto

„Man's death by sins is more than his death by fate and his life by charity is more than his life by age.“

—  Muhammad al-Taqi ninth of the Twelve Imams of Twelver Shi'ism 811 - 835

[Baqir Sharīf al-Qurashi, The life of Imam Muhammad al-Jawad, Wonderful Maxims and Arts, 2005]

Arthur Koestler Foto
Thomas Paine Foto
Walt Whitman Foto

„Nothing can happen more beautiful than death.“

—  Walt Whitman, Starting from Paumanok

Starting from Paumanok. 12
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

Barbara W. Tuchman Foto

„Nothing is more certain than death and nothing uncertain but its hour.“

—  Barbara W. Tuchman, libro A Distant Mirror

Enguerrand VII de Coucy, quoted on p. 570
A Distant Mirror (1978)

Melissa de la Cruz Foto
Friedrich Nietzsche Foto

„Hope, in its stronger forms, is a great deal more powerful stimulans to life than any sort of realized joy can ever be.“

—  Friedrich Nietzsche, libro El Anticristo

Sec. 23
The Antichrist (1888)
Contexto: Hope, in its stronger forms, is a great deal more powerful stimulans to life than any sort of realized joy can ever be. Man must be sustained in suffering by a hope so high that no conflict with actuality can dash it—so high, indeed, that no fulfilment can satisfy it: a hope reaching out beyond this world.

Charles Darwin Foto

„I have nothing to do with the origin of the primary mental powers, any more than I have with that of life itself.“

—  Charles Darwin, libro El origen de las especies

Fuente: On the Origin of Species (1859), chapter VII: "Instinct", page 207 http://darwin-online.org.uk/content/frameset?pageseq=225&itemID=F373&viewtype=side
Contexto: I must premise, that I have nothing to do with the origin of the primary mental powers, any more than I have with that of life itself. We are concerned only with the diversities of instinct and of the other mental qualities of animals within the same class.

Lewis Pugh Foto

„There is nothing more powerful than the made-up mind.“

—  Lewis Pugh Environmental campaigner, maritime lawyer and endurance swimmer 1969

TED Talk: Mind-Shifting Everest Swim, July 2010 http://www.ted.com/talks/lewis_pugh_s_mind_shifting_mt_everest_swim.html
Speaking & Features

Edward Grey, 1st Viscount Grey of Fallodon Foto

„Of all the joys of life which may fairly come under the head of recreation there is nothing more great, more refreshing, more beneficial in the widest sense of the word, than a real love of the beauty of the world…“

—  Edward Grey, 1st Viscount Grey of Fallodon British Liberal statesman 1862 - 1933

Recreation (1919)
Contexto: Of all the joys of life which may fairly come under the head of recreation there is nothing more great, more refreshing, more beneficial in the widest sense of the word, than a real love of the beauty of the world... to those who have some feeling that the natural world has beauty in it I would say, Cultivate this feeling and encourage it in every way you can. Consider the seasons, the joy of the spring, the splendour of the summer, the sunset colours of the autumn, the delicate and graceful bareness of winter trees, the beauty of snow, the beauty of light upon water, what the old Greek called the unnumbered smiling of the sea.

Bertrand Russell Foto

„I have a very simple creed: that life and joy and beauty are better than dusty death“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970

Ninetieth birthday celebration speech, 18 May 1962
1960s
Contexto: Friends,
I have a very simple creed: that life and joy and beauty are better than dusty death. This is an occasion that I hardly know how to find words for. I am more touched than I can say, and more deeply than I can ever hope to express. I have to give my very warmest possible thanks to those who have worked to produce this occasion: to the performers, whose exquisite music, exquisitely performed, was so full of delight; to those who worked in less conspicuous ways, like my friend Mr Schoenman; and to all those who have given me gifts – gifts which are valuable in themselves, and also as expressions of an undying hope for this dangerous world.
I have a very simple creed: that life and joy and beauty are better than dusty death, and I think when we listen to such music as we heard today we must all of us feel that the capacity to produce such music, and the capacity to hear such music, is a thing worth preserving and should not be thrown away in foolish squabbles. You may say it's a simple creed, but I think everything important is very simple indeed. I've found that creed sufficient, and I should think that a great many of you would also find it sufficient, or else you would hardly be here.
But now I just want to say how it's difficult, when one has embarked upon a course which invites a greater or less degree of persecution and obloquy and abuse, to find instead that one is welcomed as I have been today. It makes one feel rather humble, and I feel I must try to live up to the feelings that have produced this occasion. I hope I shall; and I thank you from the bottom of my heart.

„The highest angel has nothing of its own that it can offer unto God, no more light, love, purity, perfection, and glorious hallelujahs, that spring from itself, or its own powers, than the poorest creature upon earth.“

—  William Law English cleric, nonjuror and theological writer 1686 - 1761

¶ 8 - 9.
An Humble, Earnest and Affectionate Address to the Clergy (1761)
Contexto: God could not make the creature to be great and glorious in itself; this is as impossible, as for God to create beings into a state of independence on himself. "The heavens," saith David, "declare the glory of God"; and no creature, any more than the heavens, can declare any other glory but that of God. And as well might it be said, that the firmament shows forth its own handiwork, as that a holy divine or heavenly creature shows forth its own natural power.
But now, if all that is divine, great, glorious, and happy, in the spirits, tempers, operations, and enjoyments of the creature, is only so much of the greatness, glory, majesty, and blessedness of God, dwelling in it, and giving forth various births of his own triune life, light, and love, in and through the manifold forms and capacities of the creature to receive them, then we may infallibly see the true ground and nature of all true religion, and when and how we may be said to fulfill all our religious duty to God. For the creature's true religion, is its rendering to God all that is God's, it is its true continual acknowledging all that which it is, and has, and enjoys, in and from God. This is the one true religion of all intelligent creatures, whether in heaven, or on earth; for as they all have but one and the same relation to God, so though ever so different in their several births, states or offices, they all have but one and the same true religion, or right behavior towards God. Now the one relation, which is the ground of all true religion, and is one and the same between God and all intelligent creatures, is this, it is a total unalterable dependence upon God, an immediate continual receiving of every kind, and degree of goodness, blessing and happiness, that ever was, or can be found in them, from God alone. The highest angel has nothing of its own that it can offer unto God, no more light, love, purity, perfection, and glorious hallelujahs, that spring from itself, or its own powers, than the poorest creature upon earth. Could the angel see a spark of wisdom, goodness, or excellence, as coming from, or belonging to itself, its place in heaven would be lost, as sure as Lucifer lost his. But they are ever abiding flames of pure love, always ascending up to and uniting with God, for this reason, because the wisdom, the power, the glory, the majesty, the love, and goodness of God alone, is all that they see, and feel, and know, either within or without themselves. Songs of praise to their heavenly Father are their ravishing delight, because they see, and know, and feel, that it is the breath and Spirit of their heavenly Father that sings and rejoices in them. Their adoration in spirit and in truth never ceases, because they never cease to acknowledge the ALL of God; the ALL of God in the whole creation. This is the one religion of heaven, and nothing else is the truth of religion on earth.

Gabriel García Márquez Foto
Molière Foto
Bertrand Russell Foto

„Men fear thought as they fear nothing else on earth – more than ruin, more even than death.“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970

Fuente: 1910s, Why Men Fight https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Why_Men_Fight (1917), pp. 178-179
Contexto: Men fear thought as they fear nothing else on earth – more than ruin, more even than death. Thought is subversive and revolutionary, destructive and terrible; thought is merciless to privilege, established institutions, and comfortable habits; thought is anarchic and lawless, indifferent to authority, careless of the well-tried wisdom of the ages. Thought looks into the pit of hell and is not afraid. It sees man, a feeble speck, surrounded by unfathomable depths of silence; yet it bears itself proudly, as unmoved as if it were lord of the universe. Thought is great and swift and free, the light of the world, and the chief glory of man.

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