„All substances are poisons; there is none which is not a poison. The right dose differentiates a poison and a remedy.“

 Paracelso Foto
Paracelso4
1493 - 1541
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Peter Mere Latham Foto

„Poisons and medicine are oftentimes the same substance given with different intents.“

—  Peter Mere Latham English physician and educator 1789 - 1875
Desk Reference of Clinical Pharmacology - Page 1 by Manuchair S. Ebadi - Medical - 2008.

August Strindberg Foto

„There are poisons that blind you, and poisons that open your eyes.“

—  August Strindberg Swedish playwright, novelist, poet, essayist and painter 1849 - 1912

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Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan Foto

„Better be poisoned in one's own blood then to be poisoned in one's principle.“

—  Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan Indian independence activist 1890 - 1988
As quoted by Governor Barnett's Declaration to the Profile of Mississippi Broadcast via TV and Radio. Sep. 13, 1962 http://microsites.jfklibrary.org/olemiss/controversy/doc2.html without citation and in An unknown legend of India: A bharat ratna By Gaurav Pundeer https://books.google.com/books?isbn=3736889569

Jean-Louis Guez de Balzac Foto

„Poison cures in certain contingencies, and in those cases poison is not an evil thing.“

—  Jean-Louis Guez de Balzac French author, best known for his epistolary essays 1597 - 1654
Aristippe, ou De la cour (1658), Discours VI. Translation reported in Harbottle's Dictionary of quotations French and Italian (1904), p. 139.

 Seneca the Younger Foto
Henry Adams Foto
Wernher von Braun Foto

„Science, all by itself, has no moral dimension. The same poison-containing drug which cures when taken in small doses, may kill when taken in excess.“

—  Wernher von Braun German, later an American, aerospace engineer and space architect 1912 - 1977
Context: One of the most disconcerting issues of our time lies in the fact that modern science, along with miracle drugs and communications satellites, has also produced nuclear bombs. What makes it even worse, science has utterly failed to provide an answer on how to cope with them. As a result, science and scientists have often been blamed for the desperate dilemma in which mankind finds itself today. Science, all by itself, has no moral dimension. The same poison-containing drug which cures when taken in small doses, may kill when taken in excess. The same nuclear chain reaction that produces badly needed electrical energy when harnessed in a reactor, may kill thousands when abruptly released in an atomic bomb. Thus it does not make sense to ask a biochemist or a nuclear physicist whether his research in the field of toxic substances or nuclear processes is good or bad for mankind. In most cases the scientist will be fully aware of the possibility of an abuse of his discoveries, but aside from his innate scientific curiosity he will be motivated by a deep-seated hope and belief that something of value for his fellow man may emerge from his labors. The same applies to technology, through which most advances in the natural sciences are put to practical use. Comparable to remarks of William Masters, in "Two Sex Researchers on the Firing Line" LIFE magazine (24 June 1966), p. 49: "Science by itself has no moral dimension. But it does seek to establish truth. And upon this truth morality can be built." Variants: Science does not have a moral dimension. It is like a knife. If you give it to a surgeon or a murderer, each will use it differently. As quoted in Futurehype: The Myths of Technology Change (2009) by Robert B. Seidensticker Science does not have a moral dimension. It is like a knife. If you give it to a surgeon or a murderer, each will use it differently. Should the knife have not been developed? As quoted in Science & Society (2012) by Peter Daempfle, Ch. 6, p. 97<!-- also in Good Science, Bad Science, Pseudoscience, and Just Plain Bunk: How to Tell the Difference (2013) by Peter Daempfle, Ch. 9, p. 166 -->

Salman Rushdie Foto
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Mike Oldfield Foto
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Heinrich Heine Foto

„My songs, they say, are poisoned.
How else, love, could it be?
Thou hast, with deadly magic,
Poured poison into me.“

—  Heinrich Heine German poet, journalist, essayist, and literary critic 1797 - 1856
Lyrical Intermezzo, 57; in Poems of Heinrich Heine: Three Hundred and Twenty-five Poems (1917) Selected and translated by Louis Untermeyer, p. 73

Robert Jordan Foto

„As sure as peaches are poison.“

—  Robert Jordan American writer 1948 - 2007
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Suzanne Collins Foto
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