„While I am interested both in economics and in philosophy, the union of my interests in the two fields far exceeds their intersection“

Amartya Sen Foto
Amartya Sen8
economista indio 1933

Citas similares

Anne Enright Foto
Gertrude Stein Foto

„Human beings are interested in two things. They are interested in the reality and interested in telling about it.“

—  Gertrude Stein American art collector and experimental writer of novels, poetry and plays 1874 - 1946
What Are Masterpieces and Why Are There So Few of Them (1936), Afterword of a later edition

Andrei Tarkovsky Foto

„I am only interested in the views of two people: one is called Bresson and one called Bergman.“

—  Andrei Tarkovsky, libro Esculpir el tiempo
Sculpting in Time (1989), After the Goskino representative explains that he is trying to give the point of view of the audience.

W.B. Yeats Foto
Hugo Munsterberg Foto
Ludwig Feuerbach Foto
Pearl S.  Buck Foto

„I enjoy life because I am endlessly interested in people and their growth. My interest leads me to widen my knowledge of people, and this in turn compels me to believe in the common goodness of mankind.“

—  Pearl S. Buck American writer 1892 - 1973
This I Believe (1951), Context: I enjoy life because I am endlessly interested in people and their growth. My interest leads me to widen my knowledge of people, and this in turn compels me to believe in the common goodness of mankind. I believe that the normal human heart is born good. That is, it’s born sensitive and feeling, eager to be approved and to approve, hungry for simple happiness and the chance to live. It neither wishes to be killed, nor to kill. If through circumstances, it is overcome by evil, it never becomes entirely evil. There remain in it elements of good, however recessive, which continue to hold the possibility of restoration.

Cornel West Foto
Maurice Glasman, Baron Glasman Foto
Thornton Wilder Foto
Barry Goldwater Foto

„And if I should later be attacked for neglecting my constituents' "interests," I shall reply that I was informed that their main interest is liberty and that in that cause I am doing the very best I can.“

—  Barry Goldwater, libro The Conscience of a Conservative
The Conscience of a Conservative (1960), Context: I have little interest in streamlining government or in making it more efficient, for I mean to reduce its size. I do not undertake to promote welfare, for I propose to extend freedom. My aim is not to pass laws, but to repeal them. It is not to inaugurate new programs, but to cancel old ones that do violence to the Constitution, or that have failed their purpose, or that impose on the people an unwarranted financial burden. I will not attempt to discover whether legislation is "needed" before I have first determined whether it is constitutionally permissible. And if I should later be attacked for neglecting my constituents' "interests," I shall reply that I was informed that their main interest is liberty and that in that cause I am doing the very best I can. p. 15

Aristotle Foto

„The vices respectively fall short of or exceed what is right in both passions and actions, while virtue both finds and chooses that which is intermediate.“

—  Aristotle, libro Nicomachean Ethics
Nicomachean Ethics, Book II, 1107a.4 Variant: Some vices miss what is right because they are deficient, others because they are excessive, in feelings or in actions, while virtue finds and chooses the mean.

Paul Tillich Foto

„The union of kairos and logos is the philosophical task set for us in philosophy and in all fields that are accessible to the philosophical attitude.“

—  Paul Tillich German-American theologian and philosopher 1886 - 1965
The Protestant Era (1948), Context: The union of kairos and logos is the philosophical task set for us in philosophy and in all fields that are accessible to the philosophical attitude. The logos is to be taken up into the kairos, universal values into the fullness of time, truth into the fate of existence. The separation of idea and existence has to be brought to an end. It is the very nature of essence to come into existence, to enter into time and fate. This happens to essence not because of something extraneous to it; it is rather the expression of its own intrinsic character, of its freedom. And it is essential to philosophy to stand in existence, to create out of time and fate. It would be wrong if one were to characterize this as a knowledge bound to necessity. Since existence itself stands in fate, it is proper that philosophy should also stand in fate. Existence and knowledge both are subject to fate. The immutable and eternal heaven of truth of which Plato speaks is accessible only to a knowledge that is free from fate—to divine knowledge. The truth that stands in fate is accessible to him who stands within fate, who is himself an element of fate, for thought is a part of existence. And not only is existence fate to thought, but so also is thought fate to existence, just as everything is fate to everything else. Thought is one of the powers of being, it is a power within existence. And it proves its power by being able to spring out of any given existential situation and create something new! It can leap over existence just as existence can leap over it. Because of this characteristic of thought, the view perhaps quite naturally arose that thought may be detached from existence and may therefore liberate man from his hateful bondage to it. But the history of philosophy itself has shown that this opinion is a mistaken one. The leap of thought does not involve a breaking of the ties with existence; even in the act of its greatest freedom, thought remains bound to fate. Thus the history of philosophy shows that all existence stands in fate. Every finite thing possesses a certain power of being of its own and thus possesses a capacity for fate. The greater a finite thing’s autonomous power of being is, the higher is its capacity for fate and the more deeply is the knowledge of it involved in fate. From physics on up to the normative cultural sciences there is a gradation, the logos standing at the one end and the kairos at the other. But there is no point at which either logos or kairos alone is to be found. Hence even our knowledge of the fateful character of philosophy must at the same time stand in logos and in kairos. If it stood only in the kairos, it would be without validity and the assertion would be valid only for the one making it; if it stood only in the logos, it would be without fate and would therefore have no part in existence, for existence is involved in fate. "Philosophy and Fate"

Vincent Gallo Foto

„I hope my work is more interesting and more intelligent than I am.“

—  Vincent Gallo American film director, writer, model, actor and musician 1961
Another Man Essay

Phillip Guston Foto
Martin Luther King, Jr. Foto

„I am not interested in power for power's sake, but I'm interested in power that is moral, that is right and that is good.“

—  Martin Luther King, Jr. American clergyman, activist, and leader in the American Civil Rights Movement 1929 - 1968
1960s, As quoted in The Civil Sphere (2006) by Jeffrey C. Alexander, p. 388

Marshall McLuhan Foto

„I am not a "culture critic" because I am not in any way interested in classifying cultural forms. I am a metaphysician, interested in the life of the forms and their surprising modalities.“

—  Marshall McLuhan Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar-- a professor of English literature, a literary critic, and a communicat... 1911 - 1980
1980s and later, Context: I am not a "culture critic" because I am not in any way interested in classifying cultural forms. I am a metaphysician, interested in the life of the forms and their surprising modalities. That is why I have no interest in the academic world. Letters of Marshall McLuhan (1987), p. 413

Charles Bukowski Foto

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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