„An experiment is a question which science poses to Nature and a measurement is the recording of Nature's answer.“

—  Max Planck

Fuente: Scientific Autobiography and Other Papers (1949)
Contexto: Experimenters are the schocktroops of science… An experiment is a question which science poses to Nature, and a measurement is the recording of Nature’s answer. But before an experiment can be performed, it must be planned – the question to nature must be formulated before being posed. Before the result of a measurement can be used, it must be interpreted – Nature’s answer must be understood properly. These two tasks are those of theorists, who find himself always more and more dependent on the tools of abstract mathematics.

Max Planck Foto
Max Planck7
físico alemán 1858 - 1947

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C. V. Boys Foto

„An experiment is a question which we ask of Nature, who is always ready to give a correct answer, provided we ask properly, that is, provided we arrange a proper experiment.“

—  C. V. Boys British physicist 1855 - 1944

[Charles Vernon Boys, Soap-bubbles and the forces which mould them: Being a course of three lectures delivered in the theatre of the London institution on the afternoons of Dec. 30, 1889, Jan. 1 and 3, 1890, before a juvenile audience, Society for promoting Christian knowledge, 1896, 11]

Jacob Henle Foto

„Nature answers only when she is questioned.“

—  Jacob Henle German physician, anatomist, and zoologist 1809 - 1885

Quoted in The Conquest of Epidemic Disease, Charles-Edward Amory Winslow, 1941.

Ward Cunningham Foto
Werner Heisenberg Foto

„Natural science does not simply describe and explain nature; it is part of the interplay between nature and ourselves; it describes nature as exposed to our nature of questioning.“

—  Werner Heisenberg German theoretical physicist 1901 - 1976

Physics and Philosophy (1958)
Contexto: [I]n the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum theory we can indeed proceed without mentioning ourselves as individuals, but we cannot disregard the fact that natural science is formed by men. Natural science does not simply describe and explain nature; it is part of the interplay between nature and ourselves; it describes nature as exposed to our nature of questioning. This was a possibility of which Descartes could not have thought, but it makes a sharp separation between the world and the I impossible.
If one follows the great difficulty which even eminent scientists like Einstein had in understanding and accepting the Copenhagen interpretation... one can trace the roots... to the Cartesian partition.... it will take a long time for it [this partition] to be replaced by a really different attitude toward the problem of reality. <!--p. 81

John Constable Foto

„Painting is a science and should be pursued as an inquiry into the laws of nature. Why, then, may not a landscape be considered as a branch of natural philosophy, of which pictures are but experiments?“

—  John Constable English Romantic painter 1776 - 1837

Quote from 'The History of Landscape Painting,' fourth lecture, Royal Institution (16 June 1836), from John Constable's Discourses, ed. R.B. Beckett, (Ipswich, Suffolk Records Society, 1970), p. 69.
1830s, his lectures History of Landscape Painting (1836)

Dejan Stojanovic Foto

„Pose your questions to people and you will get countless useless answers.“

—  Dejan Stojanovic poet, writer, and businessman 1959

“A Question for the Sun,” p. 123
The Sun Watches the Sun (1999), Sequence: “Hopelessness”

Oscar Wilde Foto
Oscar Wilde Foto

„To be natural is such a very difficult pose to keep up.“

—  Oscar Wilde, La importancia de llamarse Ernesto

Fuente: The Importance of Being Earnest

Francis S. Collins Foto
John Theophilus Desaguliers Foto

„All the knowledge we have of nature depends upon facts; for without observations and experiments our natural philosophy would only be a science of terms and an unintelligible jargon.“

—  John Theophilus Desaguliers French-born British natural philosopher and clergyman 1683 - 1744

Fuente: Course of Experimental Philosophy, 1745, p. v: Preface
Contexto: All the knowledge we have of nature depends upon facts; for without observations and experiments our natural philosophy would only be a science of terms and an unintelligible jargon. But then we must call in Geometry and Arithmetics, to our Assistance, unless we are willing to content ourselves with natural History and conjectural Philosophy. For, as many causes concur in the production of compound effects, we are liable to mistake the predominant cause, unless we can measure the quantity and the effect produced, compare them with, and distinguish them from, each other, to find out the adequate cause of each single effect, and what must be the result of their joint action.

„Epistemology is always and inevitably personal. The point of the probe is always in the heart of the explorer: What is my answer to the question of the nature of knowing?“

—  Gregory Bateson English anthropologist, social scientist, linguist, visual anthropologist, semiotician and cyberneticist 1904 - 1980

Fuente: Mind and Nature: A Necessary Unity, 1979, p. 93

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