„Real poetry, is to lead a beautiful life. To live poetry is better than to write it.“

Última actualización 3 de Junio de 2021. Historia
Bashō Matsuo Foto
Bashō Matsuo5
poeta japonés 1644 - 1694

Citas similares

William Packard Foto

„You can’t lead bunny lives and write tiger poetry.“

—  William Packard American writer 1933 - 2002

From the book Art of Poetry Writing: A Guide For Poets, Students, & Readers https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/467125.Art_of_Poetry_Writing published by St. Martin's Press on June 15, 1992.

Oscar Wilde Foto
Peter Ladefoged Foto

„I wanted to find out why Shelley could write better-sounding poetry than I.“

—  Peter Ladefoged British phonetician 1925 - 2006

Los Angeles Times (1970); on why he chose to pursue phonetics.

William Soutar Foto

„My life's purpose is to write poetry — but behind the poetry must be the vision of a fresh revelation for men.“

—  William Soutar British poet 1898 - 1943

Diary, 29th August 1932.
Quotation posted with the permission of the National Scottish Library, Edinburgh, Scotland.

Oscar Wilde Foto
Subramanya Bharathi Foto

„He who writes poetry is not a poet. He whose poetry has become his life, and who has made his life his poetry — it is he who is a poet.“

—  Subramanya Bharathi Tamil poet 1882 - 1921

English translation originally from "Subramaniya Bharathi" at Tamilnation.org, also quoted in "Colliding worlds of tradition and revolution" in The Hindu (13 December 2009) http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-sundaymagazine/colliding-worlds-of-tradition-and-revolution/article662079.ece
Original: (ta) கவிதை எழுதுபவன் கவியன்று. கவிதையே வாழ்க்கையாக உடையோன், வாழ்க்கையே கவிதையாகச் செய்தோன், அவனே கவி

Richard Dawkins Foto

„There's real poetry in the real world. Science is the poetry of reality“

—  Richard Dawkins English ethologist, evolutionary biologist and author 1941

The Enemies of Reason, "Slaves to Superstition" [1.01], 13 August 2007, timecode 00:38:16ff
The Enemies of Reason (August 2007)
Variante: Science is the poetry of reality.
Contexto: The word 'mundane' has come to mean boring and dull, and it really shouldn't. It should mean the opposite because it comes from the latin 'mundus', meaning the world, and the world is anything but dull; the world is wonderful. There's real poetry in the real world. Science is the poetry of reality.

Robert E. Howard Foto

„Don’t you think that as a people, Americans have less poetry, real poetry, in their souls than any other nations?“

—  Robert E. Howard American author 1906 - 1936

From a letter to Robert W. Gordon (January 2, 1926)
Letters

Harold Monro Foto

„His poetry, as a whole, is more nearly the real right thing than any of the poetry of a somewhat older generation than mine except Mr. Yeats's.“

—  Harold Monro British poet 1879 - 1932

T. S. Eliot, in Alida Monro (ed.) The Collected Poems of Harold Monro (London: Cobden-Sanderson, 1933) p. xiv.
Criticism

Herbert Read Foto
Matthew Arnold Foto

„It is important, therefore, to hold fast to this: that poetry is at bottom a criticism of life; that the greatness of a poet lies in his powerful and beautiful application of ideas to life — to the question, How to live.“

—  Matthew Arnold English poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools 1822 - 1888

Wordsworth, originally published as "Preface to the Poems of Wordsworth" in Macmillan's Magazine (July 1879)
Essays in Criticism, second series (1888)
Contexto: If what distinguishes the greatest poets is their powerful and profound application of ideas to life, which surely no good critic will deny, then to prefix to the word ideas here the term moral makes hardly any difference, because human life itself is in so preponderating a degree moral.
It is important, therefore, to hold fast to this: that poetry is at bottom a criticism of life; that the greatness of a poet lies in his powerful and beautiful application of ideas to life — to the question, How to live. Morals are often treated in a narrow and false fashion, they are bound up with systems of thought and belief which have had their day, they are fallen into the hands of pedants and professional dealers, they grow tiresome to some of us. We find attraction, at times, even in a poetry of revolt against them; in a poetry which might take for its motto Omar Khayam's words: "Let us make up in the tavern for the time which we have wasted in the mosque." Or we find attractions in a poetry indifferent to them, in a poetry where the contents may be what they will, but where the form is studied and exquisite. We delude ourselves in either case; and the best cure for our delusion is to let our minds rest upon that great and inexhaustible word life, until we learn to enter into its meaning. A poetry of revolt against moral ideas is a poetry of revolt against life; a poetry of indifference towards moral ideas is a poetry of indifference towards life.

Matthew Arnold Foto

„A poetry of revolt against moral ideas is a poetry of revolt against life; a poetry of indifference towards moral ideas is a poetry of indifference towards life.“

—  Matthew Arnold English poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools 1822 - 1888

Wordsworth, originally published as "Preface to the Poems of Wordsworth" in Macmillan's Magazine (July 1879)
Essays in Criticism, second series (1888)
Contexto: If what distinguishes the greatest poets is their powerful and profound application of ideas to life, which surely no good critic will deny, then to prefix to the word ideas here the term moral makes hardly any difference, because human life itself is in so preponderating a degree moral.
It is important, therefore, to hold fast to this: that poetry is at bottom a criticism of life; that the greatness of a poet lies in his powerful and beautiful application of ideas to life — to the question, How to live. Morals are often treated in a narrow and false fashion, they are bound up with systems of thought and belief which have had their day, they are fallen into the hands of pedants and professional dealers, they grow tiresome to some of us. We find attraction, at times, even in a poetry of revolt against them; in a poetry which might take for its motto Omar Khayam's words: "Let us make up in the tavern for the time which we have wasted in the mosque." Or we find attractions in a poetry indifferent to them, in a poetry where the contents may be what they will, but where the form is studied and exquisite. We delude ourselves in either case; and the best cure for our delusion is to let our minds rest upon that great and inexhaustible word life, until we learn to enter into its meaning. A poetry of revolt against moral ideas is a poetry of revolt against life; a poetry of indifference towards moral ideas is a poetry of indifference towards life.

John Keats Foto
Robert Greene Foto
Theodor W. Adorno Foto

„Writing poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric.“

—  Theodor W. Adorno German sociologist, philosopher and musicologist known for his critical theory of society 1903 - 1969

[N]ach Auschwitz ein Gedicht zu schreiben, ist barbarisch...
Full quote: Kulturkritik findet sich der letzten Stufe der Dialektik von Kultur und Barbarei gegenüber: nach Auschwitz ein Gedicht zu schreiben, ist barbarisch, und das frißt auch die Erkenntnis an, die ausspricht, warum es unmöglich ward, heute Gedichte zu schreiben.
Kulturkritik und Gesellschaft [Cultural Criticism and Society] (1951); this quote is more famously known in the forms "No poetry after Auschwitz" or "There can be no poetry after Auschwitz." Sometimes a more specific proscription is made, such as "No lyric poetry after Auschwitz." The influence of the underlying idea can be seen in such derivative statements as "No history after Auschwitz."

James Dickey Foto
Joseph Joubert Foto
Leonard Cohen Foto

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