Frases de David Mitchell

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David Mitchell

Fecha de nacimiento: 12. Enero 1969

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David Mitchell es un novelista inglés.

Mitchell nació en Southport, Merseyside, en Inglaterra. Estudió en la universidad de Kent donde se tituló en Literatura inglesa y americana, y realizó un máster en Literatura comparada.

Residió un año en Sicilia y luego se mudó a Hiroshima, donde trabajó como profesor de inglés para alumnos de escuelas técnicas durante 8 años antes de regresar a Inglaterra. Desde entonces vive en Cork, Irlanda, con su esposa japonesa, Keiko, y sus dos hijos.

La primera novela de Mitchell, Escritos fantasma , transcurría por distintos puntos del globo, de Okinawa a Mongolia llegando hasta Nueva York, y usaba nueve narradores cuyas historias se entrelazaban. Con esta novela ganó el premio John Llewellyn Rhys y fue nominado para el Guardian First Book Award.

Sus siguientes trabajos, number9dream y El atlas de las nubes , fueron nominados para el Man Booker Prize.

En 2006 publicó la novela Black Swan Green, que cuenta la historia de un adolescente de 13 años, Jason Taylor, en un pueblo de Inglaterra en la época thatcheriana, el mismo año de la Guerra de las Malvinas. Jason Taylor es poeta -su seudónimo es Eliot Bolivar- y durante trece capítulos -que corresponden a todo un año- cuenta la historia de su tartamudeo, de la desintegración de su familia, de los amigos de la escuela y de las chicas. Por su capacidad para adentrarse en el mundo de Jason Taylor, la novela ha sido comparada con grandes clásicos del género como El guardián entre el centeno, de J. D. Salinger, y El señor de las moscas, de William Golding.

El editor de Mitchell para Random House en EE.UU. es el novelista David Ebershoff.

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Frases David Mitchell

„Truth is singular. Its 'versions' are mistruths.“

—  David Mitchell
Context: "Your version of the truth is the only one that matters." "Truth is singular. Its 'versions' are mistruths." "An Orison of Sonmi~451", p. 199 (Nook Edition)

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„Souls cross ages like clouds cross skies, an' tho' a cloud's shape nor hue nor size don't stay the same, it's still a cloud an' so is a soul.“

—  David Mitchell
Context: Souls cross ages like clouds cross skies, an' tho' a cloud's shape nor hue nor size don't stay the same, it's still a cloud an' so is a soul. Who can say where the cloud's blowed from or who the soul'll be 'morrow? Only Sonmi the east an' the compass an' the atlas, yay, only the atlas o' clouds. "Sloosha's Crossin' an Ev'rythin' After", p. 308

„What is this thing, "imagination?"“

—  David Mitchell
Context: What is this thing, "imagination?" A muscle that can be "forced" or "stretched"? Or something immune to the ethos of ganbaru [grit it out, or strive for one's best]? Like the relativist's view of light, it is both wave and particle, depending on what you want it to be. The verb "to imagine" is both active and passive, as in "Steve imagined his future," and "Such a future was never imagined." So, I work on my novel by imagining the world of 18th-century Nagasaki and its people and their fears and desires, as an act of will, and a lot of will is involved, believe me. However, I could ganbaru until I'm blue in the face. If my imagination doesn't work "passively" or even "intransitively," at its own behest rather than mine, and come up with cliche-demolishing twists of phrase and turns of plot and happy accidents and unexpected reactions from characters, then the book will be sterile. Well-written with luck, and even intelligent, but sterile. (...) Imagination is what makes art fertile. Interview in The Japan Times Online, (24 June 2007) https://archive.is/20121219091415/search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/fb20070624a1.html

„I am not deceived. It is the hardest of worlds to make real. Torturous advances won over generations can be lost by a single stroke of a myopic president’s pen or a vainglorious general’s sword.“

—  David Mitchell
Context: Scholars discern motions in history & formulate these motions into rules that govern the rises & falls of civilizations. My belief runs contrary, however. To wit: history admits no rules; only outcomes. What precipitates outcomes? Vicious acts & virtuous acts. What precipitates acts? Belief. Belief is both prize & battlefield, within the mind & in the mind’s mirror, the world. If we believe humanity is a ladder of tribes, a colosseum of confrontation, exploitation & bestiality, such a humanity is surely brought into being, & history’s Horroxes, Boer-haaves & Gooses shall prevail. You & I, the moneyed, the privileged, the fortunate, shall not fare so badly in this world, provided our luck holds. What of it if our consciences itch? Why undermine the dominance of our race, our gunships, our heritage & our legacy? Why fight the “natural” (oh, weaselly word!) order of things? Why? Because of this: — one fine day, a purely predatory world shall consume itself. Yes, the Devil shall take the hindmost until the foremost is the hindmost. In an individual, selfishness uglifies the soul; for the human species, selfishness is extinction. Is this the doom written within our nature? If we believe that humanity may transcend tooth & claw, if we believe divers races & creeds can share this world as peaceably as the orphans share their candlenut tree, if we believe leaders must be just, violence muzzled, power accountable & the riches of the Earth & its Oceans shared equitably, such a world will come to pass. I am not deceived. It is the hardest of worlds to make real. Torturous advances won over generations can be lost by a single stroke of a myopic president’s pen or a vainglorious general’s sword. The Pacific Journal of Adam Ewing, Monday, 13th January —, p. 528

„History admits no rules, only outcomes.“

—  David Mitchell
Context: History admits no rules, only outcomes. What precipitates outcomes? Vicious acts & virtuous acts. What precipitates acts? Belief. "The Pacific Journal of Adam Ewing", p. 528

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