Frases de James Branch Cabell

James Branch Cabell Foto
0   0

James Branch Cabell

Fecha de nacimiento: 14. Abril 1879
Fecha de muerte: 5. Mayo 1958

Anuncio

James Branch Cabell fue un escritor estadounidense de ficción y fantasía. Cabell fue muy reconocido por sus contemporáneos, incluyendo a H. L. Mencken, Edmund Wilson y Sinclair Lewis, considerando su obra como "escapista" y volviéndose popular en la década de los veinte. Para Cabell, la veracidad era "el único pecado imperdonable, no solo contra el arte, sino contra la raza humana en general."[1]​

El interés en su obra empezó a decaer en los años treinta, hecho que fue atribuido al abandono del escritor de la temática fantástica, para abordar temas más realistas.

Autores similares

Ray Bradbury Foto
Ray Bradbury76
escritor estadounidense
Anne Rice Foto
Anne Rice54
escritora estadounidense
Howard Phillips Lovecraft Foto
Howard Phillips Lovecraft33
escritor estadounidense
Stanisław Lem Foto
Stanisław Lem50
escritor polaco cuya obra se ha caracterizado por su tono...
Robert E. Howard Foto
Robert E. Howard1
escritor estadounidense
Fiódor Dostoyevski Foto
Fiódor Dostoyevski68
escritor ruso
Julio Cortázar Foto
Julio Cortázar582
escritor argentino
Rosalía de Castro Foto
Rosalía de Castro21
poetisa y novelista de España en lengua gallega y castellano
Manuel Azaña Foto
Manuel Azaña30
político español

Frases James Branch Cabell

„The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. So I elect for neither label.“

—  James Branch Cabell, The Silver Stallion
Context: Yet creeds mean very little... The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true. So I elect for neither label. Coth, in Book Four : Coth at Porutsa, Ch. XXVI : The Realist in Defeat

„This is a strong magic.This is a sententious magic.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: This is a strong magic. This is a sententious magic. They had warned me that I would here face my own destruction, that I would here face the most pitiable and terrible of all things: and I face here that which I have made of life, and life of me. I shudder; I am conscious of every appropriate sentiment. Nevertheless, sir, I must venture the suggestion that mere, explicit allegory as a form of art is somewhat obsolete. Guivric, in Book Six : In the Sylan's House, Ch. XL : Economics of Glaum-Without-Bones

Anuncio

„I do not seek to copy nature. I, on the contrary, create to divert me such faith and dreams as living among men would tend to destroy.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: I do not seek to copy nature. I, on the contrary, create to divert me such faith and dreams as living among men would tend to destroy. But as it is, my worshipers depart from me heartedly, in this grey corridor, and they are devoid of fear and parvanimity; for the effect of my singing, like that of all great singing, is to fill my hearers with a sentiment of their importance as moral beings and the greatness of their destinies. The Gander, in Book Seven : What Saraïde Wanted, Ch. XLV : The Gander Also Generalizes

„The transfiguring touch was to come, it seemed from a girl's lips; but it had not; he kissed, and life remained uncharmed.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: The transfiguring touch was to come, it seemed from a girl's lips; but it had not; he kissed, and life remained uncharmed.... at the bottom of his heart, he was still expecting the transfiguring touch to come, some day, from something he was to obtain or do, perhaps to-morrow.... Then he had by accident found out the sigil's power... Ch. 27 : Evolution of a Vestryman

„He had a quiet way with the girls, and with the men a way of solemn, blinking simplicity which caused the more hasty in judgment to consider him a fool.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: He had a quiet way with the girls, and with the men a way of solemn, blinking simplicity which caused the more hasty in judgment to consider him a fool. Then, too, young Manuel was very often detected smiling sleepily over nothing, and his gravest care in life appeared to be that figure which Manuel had made out of marsh clay from the pool of Haranton. This figure he was continually reshaping and realtering. The figure stood upon the margin of the pool; and near by were two stones overgrown with moss, and supporting a cross of old worm-eaten wood, which commemorated what had been done there. Ch. I : How Manuel Left the Mire

„And one is fain to be climbing where only angels have trod,
But is fettered and tied to another's side who fears that it might look odd.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: For this is the song of the double-soul, distortedly two in one, — Of the wearied eyes that still behold the fruit ere the seed be sown, And derive affright for the nearing night from the light of the noontide sun. For one that with hope in the morning set forth, and knew never a fear, They have linked with another whom omens bother; and he whispers in one's ear. And one is fain to be climbing where only angels have trod, But is fettered and tied to another's side who fears that it might look odd. "Ballad of the Double-Soul"

„I have made at worst some neat, precise and joyous little tales which prevaricate tenderly about the universe and veil the pettiness of human nature with screens of verbal jewelwork. It is not the actual world they tell about, but a vastly superior place where the Dream is realized and everything which in youth we knew was possible comes true. It is a world we have all glimpsed, just once, and have not ever entered, and have not ever forgotten.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: I have made at worst some neat, precise and joyous little tales which prevaricate tenderly about the universe and veil the pettiness of human nature with screens of verbal jewelwork. It is not the actual world they tell about, but a vastly superior place where the Dream is realized and everything which in youth we knew was possible comes true. It is a world we have all glimpsed, just once, and have not ever entered, and have not ever forgotten. So people like my little tales.... Do they induce delusions? Oh, well, you must give people what they want, and literature is a vast bazaar where customers come to purchase everything except mirrors. "Auctorial Induction"

„The Dream, as I now know, is not best served by making parodies of it“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: The Dream, as I now know, is not best served by making parodies of it, and it does not greatly matter after all whether a book be an epic or a directory. What really matters is that there is so much faith and love and kindliness which we can share with and provoke in others, and that by cleanly, simple, generous living we approach perfection in the highest and most lovely of all arts.... But you, I think, have always comprehended this. "Auctorial Induction"

Anuncio

„You must permit that I begin it in my own way, with what may to you at first seem dream-stuff.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: You must permit that I begin it in my own way, with what may to you at first seem dream-stuff. For I commence at Storisende, in the world's youth, when the fourth Count Emmerick reigned in Poictesme, having not yet blundered into the disfavor of his papal cousin Adrian VII.... With such roundabout gambits alone can some of us approach — as one fancy begets another, if you will — to proud assurance that life is not blind and aimless business; not all a hopeless waste and confusion; and that we ourselves may (by and by) be strong and excellent and wise. "Richard Fentnor Harroby" in Ch. 1 : Pallation of the Gambit

„I quite fixedly believe the Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, that face on other worlds than ours.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: I quite fixedly believe the Wardens of Earth sometimes unbar strange windows, that face on other worlds than ours. And some of us, I think, once in a while get a peep through these windows. But we are not permitted to get a long peep, or an unobstructed peep, nor very certainly, are we permitted to see all there is — out yonder. The fatal fault, sir, of your theorizing is that it is too complete. It aims to throw light upon the universe, and therefore is self-evidently moonshine. The Wardens of Earth do not desire that we should understand the universe, Mr. Kennaston; it is part of Their appointed task to insure that we never do; and because of Their efficiency every notion that any man, dead, living, or unborn, might form as to the universe will necessarily prove wrong. Ch 28 : The Shallowest Sort of Mysticism

„He is swift to deride all the world outside, and blind to the world within:
So that man may make sport and amuse Us, in battling for phrases or pelf,
Now that each may know what forebodeth woe to his neighbor, and not to himself.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: In the beginning the Gods made man, and fashioned the sky and the sea, And the earth's fair face for man's dwelling-place, and this was the Gods' decree: — "Lo, We have given to man five wits: he discerneth folly and sin; He is swift to deride all the world outside, and blind to the world within: So that man may make sport and amuse Us, in battling for phrases or pelf, Now that each may know what forebodeth woe to his neighbor, and not to himself." "Ballad of the Double-Soul"

„The book "means" thereafter, perforce, — both grammatically and actually, — whatever meaning this or that reader gets out of it.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: A book, once it is printed and published, becomes individual. It is by its publication as decisively severed from its author as in parturition a child is cut off from its parent. The book "means" thereafter, perforce, — both grammatically and actually, — whatever meaning this or that reader gets out of it. "A Note on Cabellian Harmonics" in Cabellian Harmonics (April 1928)

Anuncio

„People progressed from the kindergarten to the cemetery assuming that their emotion at every crisis was what books taught them was the appropriate emotion, and without noticing that it was in reality something quite different.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: The purblind majority quite honestly believed that literature was meant to mimic human life, and that it did so. And in consequence, their love-affairs, their maxims, their so-called natural ties and instincts, and above all, their wickedness, became just so many bungling plagiarisms from something they had read, in a novel or a Bible or a poem or a newspaper. People progressed from the kindergarten to the cemetery assuming that their emotion at every crisis was what books taught them was the appropriate emotion, and without noticing that it was in reality something quite different. Human life was a distorting tarnished mirror held up to literature: this much at least of Wilde's old paradox — that life mimicked art — was indisputable. Human life, very clumsily, tried to reproduce the printed word. Ch. 27 : Evolution of a Vestryman

„James Branch Cabell made this book so that he who wills may read the story of mans eternally unsatisfied hunger in search of beauty.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: James Branch Cabell made this book so that he who wills may read the story of mans eternally unsatisfied hunger in search of beauty. Ettarre stays inaccessible always and her lovliness is his to look on only in his dreams. All men she must evade at the last and many ar the ways of her elusion. Afterpiece : a hidden inscription on the Sigil of Scoteia (and so spelled, in a peculiar modification of Roman capital letters)

„All men she must evade at the last and many ar the ways of her elusion.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: James Branch Cabell made this book so that he who wills may read the story of mans eternally unsatisfied hunger in search of beauty. Ettarre stays inaccessible always and her lovliness is his to look on only in his dreams. All men she must evade at the last and many ar the ways of her elusion. Afterpiece : a hidden inscription on the Sigil of Scoteia (and so spelled, in a peculiar modification of Roman capital letters)

„I am Manuel. I have lived in the loneliness which is common to all men, but the difference is that I have known it.“

—  James Branch Cabell
Context: I am Manuel. I have lived in the loneliness which is common to all men, but the difference is that I have known it. Now it is necessary for me, as it is necessary for all men, to die in this same loneliness, and I know that there is no help for it. Manuel, in Ch. XXXIX : The Passing of Manuel

Siguiente
Aniversarios de hoy
Joseph Murphy Foto
Joseph Murphy10
escritor estadounidense 1898 - 1981
Cristóbal Colón Foto
Cristóbal Colón11
explorador, navegante y descubridor 1451 - 1506
Clara Schumann Foto
Clara Schumann6
1819 - 1896
Otros (number)s aniversarios hoy
Autores similares
Ray Bradbury Foto
Ray Bradbury76
escritor estadounidense
Anne Rice Foto
Anne Rice54
escritora estadounidense
Howard Phillips Lovecraft Foto
Howard Phillips Lovecraft33
escritor estadounidense
Stanisław Lem Foto
Stanisław Lem50
escritor polaco cuya obra se ha caracterizado por su tono...
Robert E. Howard Foto
Robert E. Howard1
escritor estadounidense