Frases de William Morris

William Morris Foto
0  0

William Morris

Fecha de nacimiento: 24. Marzo 1834
Fecha de muerte: 3. Octubre 1896
Otros nombres:উইলিয়াম মরিস,Вилијам Морис

Anuncio

William Morris fue un arquitecto, diseñador y maestro textil, traductor, poeta, novelista y activista socialista. Asociado con el movimiento británico Arts and Crafts, fue uno de los principales promotores de la reactivación del arte textil tradicional manteniendo, recuperando y mejorando los métodos de producción artesanales frente a la producción en cadena e industrial. Fue un gran defensor de la conservación del patrimonio arquitectónico religioso y civil. Sus aportaciones literarias contribuyeron a extender el género moderno de la fantasía. Desempeñó un importante y muy activo papel en la propaganda y difusión, mediante escritos, mítines y conferencias, del incipiente movimiento socialista británico.

Frases William Morris

„To thee, when thou didst try to conceive of them, the ways of the days to come seemed follies scarce to be thought of; yet shall they come to be familiar things“

— William Morris
Context: To thee, when thou didst try to conceive of them, the ways of the days to come seemed follies scarce to be thought of; yet shall they come to be familiar things, and an order by which every man liveth, ill as he liveth, so that men shall deem of them, that thus it hath been since the beginning of the world, and that thus it shall be while the world endureth... Yet in time shall this also grow old, and doubt shall creep in, because men shall scarce be able to live by that order, and the complaint of the poor shall be hearkened, no longer as a tale not utterly grievous, but as a threat of ruin, and a fear. Then shall these things, which to thee seem follies, and to the men between thee and me mere wisdom and the bond of stability, seem follies once again; yet, whereas men have so long lived by them, they shall cling to them yet from blindness and from fear; and those that see, and that have thus much conquered fear that they are furthering the real time that cometh and not the dream that faileth, these men shall the blind and the fearful mock and missay, and torment and murder: and great and grievous shall be the strife in those days, and many the failures of the wise, and too oft sore shall be the despair of the valiant; and back-sliding, and doubt, and contest between friends and fellows lacking time in the hubbub to understand each other, shall grieve many hearts and hinder the Host of the Fellowship: yet shall all bring about the end, till thy deeming of folly and ours shall be one, and thy hope and our hope; and then — the Day will have come. Ch. 12: Ill Would Change Be At Whiles Were It Not For The Change Beyond The Change.

„I say to you that earth and heaven are not two but one; and this one is that which ye know, and are each one of you a part of, to wit, the Holy Church, and in each one of you dwelleth the life of the Church, unless ye slay it.“

— William Morris
Context: Forsooth, ye have heard it said that ye shall do well in this world that in the world to come ye may live happily for ever; do ye well then, and have your reward both on earth and in heaven; for I say to you that earth and heaven are not two but one; and this one is that which ye know, and are each one of you a part of, to wit, the Holy Church, and in each one of you dwelleth the life of the Church, unless ye slay it. Ch. 4: The Voice of John Ball

Anuncio

„So we will stick to our word, which means a change of the basis of society; it may frighten people, but it will at least warn them that there is something to be frightened about, which will be no less dangerous for being ignored; and also it may encourage some people, and will mean to them at least not a fear, but a hope.“

— William Morris
Context: The word Revolution, which we Socialists are so often forced to use, has a terrible sound in most people's ears, even when we have explained to them that it does not necessarily mean a change accompanied by riot and all kinds of violence, and cannot mean a change made mechanically and in the teeth of opinion by a group of men who have somehow managed to seize on the executive power for the moment. Even when we explain that we use the word revolution in its etymological sense, and mean by it a change in the basis of society, people are scared at the idea of such a vast change, and beg that you will speak of reform and not revolution. As, however, we Socialists do not at all mean by our word revolution what these worthy people mean by their word reform, I can't help thinking that it would be a mistake to use it, whatever projects we might conceal beneath its harmless envelope. So we will stick to our word, which means a change of the basis of society; it may frighten people, but it will at least warn them that there is something to be frightened about, which will be no less dangerous for being ignored; and also it may encourage some people, and will mean to them at least not a fear, but a hope.

„So with this Earthly Paradise it is,
If ye will read aright, and pardon me,
Who strive to build a shadowy isle of bliss
Midmost the beating of the steely sea,
Where tossed about all hearts of men must be;
Whose ravening monsters mighty men shall slay,
Not the poor singer of an empty day.“

— William Morris
Context: Folk say, a wizard to a northern king At Christmas-tide such wondrous things did show, That through one window men beheld the spring, And through another saw the summer glow, And through a third the fruited vines a-row, While still, unheard, but in its wonted way, Piped the drear wind of that December day. So with this Earthly Paradise it is, If ye will read aright, and pardon me, Who strive to build a shadowy isle of bliss Midmost the beating of the steely sea, Where tossed about all hearts of men must be; Whose ravening monsters mighty men shall slay, Not the poor singer of an empty day.

„Love is enough: while ye deemed him a-sleeping,
There were signs of his coming and sounds of his feet“

— William Morris
Context: Love is enough: while ye deemed him a-sleeping, There were signs of his coming and sounds of his feet; His touch it was that would bring you to weeping, When the summer was deepest and music most sweet...

„A sorry merchant am I on this day,
E'en as thou willest so must I obey.“

— William Morris
Context: From those thy words, I deem from some distress By deeds of mine thy dear life I might save; O then, delay not! if one ever gave His life to any, mine I give to thee; Come, tell me what the price of love must be? Swift death, to be with thee a day and night And with the earliest dawning to be slain? Or better, a long year of great delight, And many years of misery and pain? Or worse, and this poor hour for all my gain? A sorry merchant am I on this day, E'en as thou willest so must I obey.

„It happened once, some men of Italy
Midst the Greek Islands went a sea-roving,
And much good fortune had they on the sea“

— William Morris
Context: It happened once, some men of Italy Midst the Greek Islands went a sea-roving, And much good fortune had they on the sea: Of many a man they had the ransoming, And many a chain they gat and goodly thing; And midst their voyage to an isle they came, Whereof my story keepeth not the name.

„Pass by me, I hearken, and think of you not!“

— William Morris
Context: Wherewith will ye buy it, ye rich who behold me? Draw out from your coffers your rest and your laughter, And the fair gilded hope of the dawn coming after! Nay this I sell not, — though ye bought me and sold me, — For your house stored with such things from threshold to rafter. — Pass by me, I hearken, and think of you not!

Anuncio

„So long as the system of competition in the production and exchange of the means of life goes on, the degradation of the arts will go on“

— William Morris
Context: So long as the system of competition in the production and exchange of the means of life goes on, the degradation of the arts will go on; and if that system is to last for ever, then art is doomed, and will surely die; that is to say, civilization will die. "Art Under Plutocracy" (1883).

„Masters, I have to tell a tale of woe,
A tale of folly and of wasted life“

— William Morris
Context: Masters, I have to tell a tale of woe, A tale of folly and of wasted life, Hope against hope, the bitter dregs of strife, Ending, where all things end, in death at last. Introductory verse.

„Love is enough: draw near and behold me
Ye who pass by the way to your rest and your laughter“

— William Morris
Context: Love is enough: draw near and behold me Ye who pass by the way to your rest and your laughter, And are full of the hope of the dawn coming after; For the strong of the world have bought me and sold me And my house is all wasted from threshold to rafter. — Pass by me, and hearken, and think of me not!

„Go back again, now you have seen us, and your outward eyes have learned that in spite of all the infallible maxims of your day there is yet a time of rest in store for the world, when mastery has changed into fellowship — but not before.“

— William Morris
Context: Go back again, now you have seen us, and your outward eyes have learned that in spite of all the infallible maxims of your day there is yet a time of rest in store for the world, when mastery has changed into fellowship — but not before. Go back again, then, and while you live you will see all round you people engaged in making others live lives which are not their own, while they themselves care nothing for their own real lives — men who hate life though they fear death. Go back and be the happier for having seen us, for having added a little hope to your struggle. Go on living while you may, striving, with whatsoever pain and labour needs must be, to build up little by little the new day of fellowship, and rest, and happiness.

Anuncio

„Fear and Hope — those are the names of the two great passions which rule the race of man, and with which revolutionists have to deal; to give hope to the many oppressed and fear to the few oppressors, that is our business“

— William Morris
Context: Fear and Hope — those are the names of the two great passions which rule the race of man, and with which revolutionists have to deal; to give hope to the many oppressed and fear to the few oppressors, that is our business; if we do the first and give hope to the many, the few must be frightened by their hope; otherwise we do not want to frighten them; it is not revenge we want for poor people, but happiness; indeed, what revenge can be taken for all the thousands of years of the sufferings of the poor?

„Morn shall meet noon
While the flower-stems yet move,
Though the wind dieth soon
And the clouds fade above.“

— William Morris
Context: Morn shall meet noon While the flower-stems yet move, Though the wind dieth soon And the clouds fade above. Loved lips are thine As I tremble and hearken; Bright thine eyes shine, Though the leaves thy brow darken. O Love, kiss me into silence, lest no word avail me, Stay my head with thy bosom lest breath and life fail me! O sweet day, O rich day, made long for our love!

„Dawn talks to Day
Over dew-gleaming flowers“

— William Morris
Context: Dawn talks to Day Over dew-gleaming flowers, Night flies away Till the resting of hours: Fresh are thy feet And with dreams thine eyes glistening, Thy still lips are sweet Though the world is a-listening. O Love, set a word in my mouth for our meeting, Cast thine arms round about me to stay my heart's beating! O fresh day, O fair day, O long day made ours!

„O Love, set a word in my mouth for our meeting“

— William Morris
Context: Dawn talks to Day Over dew-gleaming flowers, Night flies away Till the resting of hours: Fresh are thy feet And with dreams thine eyes glistening, Thy still lips are sweet Though the world is a-listening. O Love, set a word in my mouth for our meeting, Cast thine arms round about me to stay my heart's beating! O fresh day, O fair day, O long day made ours!

Siguiente
Aniversarios de hoy
Jenny Sullivan
actriz estadounidense 1946
Rachel Cohn1
escritora estadounidense 1968
Juan de la Cruz Foto
Juan de la Cruz23
poeta místico y religioso carmelita descalzo del Renacimi... 1542 - 1591
Vicente Aleixandre Foto
Vicente Aleixandre12
poeta español 1898 - 1984
Otros (number)s aniversarios hoy
Autores similares
John Ronald Reuel Tolkien Foto
John Ronald Reuel Tolkien10
escritor, poeta, filólogo y profesor universitario británico
Robert Baden-Powell Foto
Robert Baden-Powell38
militar británico, fundador del Movimiento Scout
 Sófocles Foto
Sófocles74
dramaturgo de la antigua Grecia
Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer Foto
Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer59
poeta y narrador español
Julio Cortázar Foto
Julio Cortázar651
escritor argentino
Juan Domingo Perón Foto
Juan Domingo Perón46
vigésimo séptimo presidente de la Nación Argentina, entre...
Mario Benedetti Foto
Mario Benedetti407
escritor uruguayo
Laura Restrepo Foto
Laura Restrepo27
escritora y periodista colombiana