Frases de Francesco Petrarca

Francesco Petrarca Foto
9   18

Francesco Petrarca

Fecha de nacimiento: 20. Julio 1304
Fecha de muerte: 18. Julio 1374

Anuncio

Francesco Petrarca fue un lírico y humanista italiano, cuya poesía dio lugar a una corriente literaria que influyó en autores como Garcilaso de la Vega , William Shakespeare y Edmund Spenser , bajo el sobrenombre genérico de Petrarquismo. Tan influyente como las nuevas formas y temas que trajo a la poesía, fue su concepción humanista, con la que intentó armonizar el legado grecolatino con las ideas del Cristianismo. Por otro lado, Petrarca predicó la unión de toda Italia para recuperar la grandeza que había tenido en la época del Imperio romano.

Autores similares

Giovanni Boccaccio Foto
Giovanni Boccaccio9
escritor y humanista italiano
Erasmo de Rotterdam Foto
Erasmo de Rotterdam74
humanista y teólogo neerlandés
Wasily Kandinsky Foto
Wasily Kandinsky7
pintor ruso
Juan Ramón Jimenéz Foto
Juan Ramón Jimenéz17
Autor literario español
Giacomo Balla2
artista italiano

Frases Francesco Petrarca

Anuncio
Anuncio

„Rarely do great beauty and great virtue dwell together.“

—  Francesco Petrarca
De remediis utriusque fortunae (1354), Book II

„Man has no greater enemy than himself“

—  Francesco Petrarca
Context: Man has no greater enemy than himself. I have acted contrary to my sentiments and inclination; throughout our whole lives we do what we never intended, and what we proposed to do, we leave undone. As quoted in An Examination of the Advantages of Solitude and of Its Operations (1808) by Johann Georg Ritter von Zimmermann

Anuncio

„I seem to you to have written everything, or at least a great deal, while to myself I appear to have produced almost nothing.“

—  Francesco Petrarca
Context: I certainly will not reject the praise you bestow upon me for having stimulated in many instances, not only in Italy but perhaps beyond its confines also, the pursuit of studies such as ours, which have suffered neglect for so many centuries; I am, indeed, almost the oldest of those among us who are engaged in the cultivation of these subjects. But I cannot accept the conclusion you draw from this, namely, that I should give place to younger minds, and, interrupting the plan of work on which I am engaged, give others an opportunity to write something, if they will, and not seem longer to desire to reserve everything for my own pen. How radically do our opinions differ, although, at bottom, our object is the same! I seem to you to have written everything, or at least a great deal, while to myself I appear to have produced almost nothing. Letter to Giovanni Boccaccio (28 April 1373) as quoted in Petrarch : The First Modern Scholar and Man of Letters (1898) edited by James Harvey Robinson and Henry Winchester Rolfe, p. 417

„I certainly will not reject the praise you bestow upon me for having stimulated in many instances, not only in Italy but perhaps beyond its confines also, the pursuit of studies such as ours, which have suffered neglect for so many centuries“

—  Francesco Petrarca
Context: I certainly will not reject the praise you bestow upon me for having stimulated in many instances, not only in Italy but perhaps beyond its confines also, the pursuit of studies such as ours, which have suffered neglect for so many centuries; I am, indeed, almost the oldest of those among us who are engaged in the cultivation of these subjects. But I cannot accept the conclusion you draw from this, namely, that I should give place to younger minds, and, interrupting the plan of work on which I am engaged, give others an opportunity to write something, if they will, and not seem longer to desire to reserve everything for my own pen. How radically do our opinions differ, although, at bottom, our object is the same! I seem to you to have written everything, or at least a great deal, while to myself I appear to have produced almost nothing. Letter to Giovanni Boccaccio (28 April 1373) as quoted in Petrarch : The First Modern Scholar and Man of Letters (1898) edited by James Harvey Robinson and Henry Winchester Rolfe, p. 417

„To-day I made the ascent of the highest mountain in this region, which is not improperly called Ventosum. My only motive was the wish to see what so great an elevation had to offer.“

—  Francesco Petrarca
Context: To-day I made the ascent of the highest mountain in this region, which is not improperly called Ventosum. My only motive was the wish to see what so great an elevation had to offer. I have had the expedition in mind for many years; for, as you know, I have lived in this region from infancy, having been cast here by that fate which determines the affairs of men. Consequently the mountain, which is visible from a great distance, was ever before my eyes, and I conceived the plan of some time doing what I have at last accomplished to-day. Letter to Dionigi di Borgo San Sepolcro (26 April 1336), "The Ascent of Mount Ventoux" in Familiar Letters http://petrarch.petersadlon.com/read_letters.html?s=pet17.html as translated by James Harvey Robinson (1898); the name Mount Ventosum relates to it being a windy mountain.

„Continued work and application form my soul's nourishment. So soon as I commenced to rest and relax I should cease to live.“

—  Francesco Petrarca
Context: Continued work and application form my soul's nourishment. So soon as I commenced to rest and relax I should cease to live. I know my own powers. I am not fitted for other kinds of work, but my reading and writing, which you would have me discontinue, are easy tasks, nay, they are a delightful rest, and relieve the burden of heavier anxieties. There is no lighter burden, nor more agreeable, than a pen. Other pleasures fail us or wound us while they charm, but the pen we take up rejoicing and lay down with satisfaction, for it has the power to advantage not only its lord and master, but many others as well, even though they be far away — sometimes, indeed, though they be not born for thousands of years to come. I believe I speak but the strict truth when I claim that as there is none among earthly delights more noble than literature, so there is none so lasting, none gentler, or more faithful; there is none which accompanies its possessor through the vicissitudes of life at so small a cost of effort or anxiety. Letter to Giovanni Boccaccio (28 April 1373) as quoted in Petrarch : The First Modern Scholar and Man of Letters (1898) edited by James Harvey Robinson and Henry Winchester Rolfe, p. 426

Siguiente
Aniversarios de hoy
Juan de la Cruz Foto
Juan de la Cruz24
poeta místico y religioso carmelita descalzo del Renacimi... 1542 - 1591
Ernesto Sabato Foto
Ernesto Sabato39
escritor argentino 1911 - 2011
Rodrigo Bueno Foto
Rodrigo Bueno25
1973 - 2000
Carlos Gardel Foto
Carlos Gardel14
cantante, compositor musical y actor nacionalizado argent... 1890 - 1935
Otros (number)s aniversarios hoy
Autores similares