Frases de Henry Adams

Henry Adams Foto
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Henry Adams

Fecha de nacimiento: 16. Febrero 1838
Fecha de muerte: 27. Marzo 1918
Otros nombres: 亨利·亞當斯, Henry Brooks Adams

Henry Brooks Adams fue un hombre de letras e historiador estadounidense.

Siendo parte de la élite de Boston y descendiente de dos presidentes, fue educado con cierta aversión por la política norteamericana de su tiempo. De joven fue corresponsal y editor de un periódico, exigió reformas sociales y políticas, pero se vio desilusionado con un mundo que él describía como desprovisto de principios.

Esa pérdida de fe, fue reflejada en su novela Democracy: An American Novel . Su estudio sobre la democracia de Estados Unidos, culminó en su History of the United States of America de nueve tomos , la cual recibió elogios inmediatos.

En Monte Saint-Michel y Chartres , describió la concepción del mundo medieval manifiesta en su arquitectura. The Education of Henry Adams , es su obra más conocida y una de las autobiografías más sobresalientes de la literatura occidental, donde plasma sus conflictos con las incertidumbres del siglo XX.

Obras

Frases Henry Adams

„Un amigo en la vida es mucho. Dos son demasiado. Tres son imposibles.“

—  Henry Adams

Fuente: Moya Cabrera, Javier. La materia. Editorial Libros.com, 2016. ISBN 9788416616626.

„Un profesor trabaja para la eternidad: nunca puede decir dónde acaba su influencia.“

—  Henry Adams

Original: «A teacher affects eternity, he can never tell where his influence stops».
Fuente: Ortega Blake, Arturo. El gran libro de las frases célebres. Editorial Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial México, 2013 ISBN 978-60-7311-631-2.
Fuente: Egan, James. 3000 Astounding Quotes. Edición ilustrada. Editorial Lulu.com, 2015. ISBN 9781326400378. p. 38.

„La política práctica consiste en ignorar los hechos.“

—  Henry Adams

Original: «Practical politics consists in ignoring facts».

„En cuanto a América, es el fruto ideal de todas tus esperanzas y reformas juveniles. Todos son bastante decentes, respetables, domésticos, burgueses, de clase media y aburridos. No hay absolutamente nada que repeler excepto que es un aburrimiento.“

—  Henry Adams

Original: «As for America, it is the ideal fruit of all your youthful hopes and reforms. Everybody is fairly decent, respectable, domestic, bourgeois, middle-class, and tiresome. There is absolutely nothing to revile except that is a bore».

„Nada en la educación es tan sorprendente como la cantidad de ignorancia que acumula en forma de hechos inertes.“

—  Henry Adams

Original: «Nothing in education is so astonishing as the amount of ignorance it accumulates in the form of inert facts».

„Las palabras son resbaladizas.“

—  Henry Adams, libro The Education of Henry Adams

Original: «Words are slipeery».
Fuente: The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations. ISBN 9780195168235. p. 362.
Fuente: The Education of Henry Adams.

„Filosofía: respuesta ininteligible a problemas insolubles.“

—  Henry Adams

Original: «Philosophy: Unintelligible answer to insoluble problems».

„Creation was not successive; it was one instantaneous thought and act, identical with the will, and was complete and unchangeabble from end to end, including time as one of its functions.“

—  Henry Adams

Mont Saint Michel and Chartres (1904)
Contexto: Creation was not successive; it was one instantaneous thought and act, identical with the will, and was complete and unchangeabble from end to end, including time as one of its functions. Thomas was as clear as possible on that point:— "Supposing God wills anything in effect, he cannot will not to will it, because his will cannot change." He wills that some things shall be contingent and others necessary, but he wills in the same act that the contingency shall be necessary. "They are contingent because God has willed them to be so, and with this object has subjected them to causes which are so." In the same way he wills that his creation shall develop itself in time and space and sequence, but he creates these conditions as well as the events. He creates the whole, in one act, complete, unchangeable, and it is then unfolded like a rolling panorama with its predetermined contingencies.Man's free choice — liberum arbitrium — falls easily into place as a predetermined contingency. God is the First Cause, and acts in all Secondary Causes directly; but while he acts mechanically on the rest of creation,— as far as is known,— he acts freely at one point, and this free action remains free as far as it extends on that line. Man's freedom derives from this source, but it is simply apparent, as far as he is a cause; it is a [... ] Reflex Action of the complicated mirror [... ] called Mind, and [... ] an illusion arising from the extreme delicacy of the machine.

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„For reasons which many persons thought ridiculous, Mrs. Lightfoot Lee decided to pass the winter in Washington.“

—  Henry Adams, libro Democracy: An American Novel

Fuente: Democracy: An American Novel (1880), Ch. I, first lines
Contexto: For reasons which many persons thought ridiculous, Mrs. Lightfoot Lee decided to pass the winter in Washington. She was in excellent health, but she said that the climate would do her good.

„Science affirmed that choice was not free,— could not be free,— without abandoning the unity of force and the foundation of law. Society insisted that its choice must be left free, whatever became of science or unity.“

—  Henry Adams

Mont Saint Michel and Chartres (1904)
Contexto: Experience proved that man's power of choice in action was very far from absolute, and logic seemed to require that every choice should have some predetermining cause which decided the will to act. Science affirmed that choice was not free,— could not be free,— without abandoning the unity of force and the foundation of law. Society insisted that its choice must be left free, whatever became of science or unity. Saint Thomas was required to illustrate the theory of liberum arbitrium by choosing a path through these difficulies, where path there was obviously none.

„He wills that some things shall be contingent and others necessary, but he wills in the same act that the contingency shall be necessary.“

—  Henry Adams

Mont Saint Michel and Chartres (1904)
Contexto: Creation was not successive; it was one instantaneous thought and act, identical with the will, and was complete and unchangeabble from end to end, including time as one of its functions. Thomas was as clear as possible on that point:— "Supposing God wills anything in effect, he cannot will not to will it, because his will cannot change." He wills that some things shall be contingent and others necessary, but he wills in the same act that the contingency shall be necessary. "They are contingent because God has willed them to be so, and with this object has subjected them to causes which are so." In the same way he wills that his creation shall develop itself in time and space and sequence, but he creates these conditions as well as the events. He creates the whole, in one act, complete, unchangeable, and it is then unfolded like a rolling panorama with its predetermined contingencies.Man's free choice — liberum arbitrium — falls easily into place as a predetermined contingency. God is the First Cause, and acts in all Secondary Causes directly; but while he acts mechanically on the rest of creation,— as far as is known,— he acts freely at one point, and this free action remains free as far as it extends on that line. Man's freedom derives from this source, but it is simply apparent, as far as he is a cause; it is a [... ] Reflex Action of the complicated mirror [... ] called Mind, and [... ] an illusion arising from the extreme delicacy of the machine.

„Mankind could not admit an anarchical,— a dual or multiple — universe. The world was there, staring them in the face, with all its chaotic conditions, and society insisted on its Unity in self-defence. Society still insists on treating it as Unity though no longer affecting logic.“

—  Henry Adams

"Affecting": making a pretence of
Mont Saint Michel and Chartres (1904)
Contexto: Mankind could not admit an anarchical,— a dual or multiple — universe. The world was there, staring them in the face, with all its chaotic conditions, and society insisted on its Unity in self-defence. Society still insists on treating it as Unity though no longer affecting logic. Society insists on its free will, although free will has never been explained to the satisfaction of any but those who much wish to be satisfied, and although the words in any common sense implied not unity but duality in creation. The Church had nothing to do with inventing this riddle,— the oldest that fretted mankind.

„We do not, and never can, know the twelfth-century woman, or, for that matter, any other woman“

—  Henry Adams

Mont Saint Michel and Chartres (1904)
Contexto: Eleanor and her daughter Mary and her granddaughter Blanche knew as well as Saint Bernard did, or Saint Francis, what a brute the emancipated man could be; and as though they foresaw the society of the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries, they used every terror they could invent as well as every tenderness they could invoke, to tame the beasts around them. Their charge was of manners, and to teach manners, they made a school which they called their Court of Love, with a code of law to which they gave the name of "courteous love". The decisions of this Court were recorded, like the decisions of a modern Bench, under the names of the great ladies who made them, and were enforced by the ladies of good society for whose guidance they were made. They are worth reading, and anyone who likes may read them to this day, with considerable scepticism about their genuineness. The doubt is only ignorance. We do not, and never can, know the twelfth-century woman, or, for that matter, any other woman, but we do know the literature she created; we know the art she lived in, and the religion she professed. We can collect from them some idea why the Virgin Mary ruled, and what she was taken to be, by the world which worshipped her.

„An economic civilisation troubles itself about the universe much as a hive of honey-bees troubles about the ocean, only as a region to be avoided. The hive of Saint Thomas sheltered God and Man, Mind and Matter, The Universe and the Atom, the One and the Multiple, within the walls of a harmonious home.“

—  Henry Adams

Mont Saint Michel and Chartres (1904)
Contexto: Saint Thomas is still alive and overshadows as many schools as he ever did; at all events as many as the Church maintains. He has outlived Descartes and Leibnitz and a dozen other schools of philosophy more or less serious in their day. He has mostly outived Hume, Voltaire and the militant sceptics. His method is typical and classic; his sentences, when interpreted by the Church, seem, even to an untrained mind, intelligible and consistent; his Church Intellectual remains practically unchanged, and, like the Cathedral of Beauvais, erect although the storms of six or seven centuries have prostrated, over and over again, every other social or political or juristic shelter. Compared with it, all modern systems are complex and chaotic, crowded with self-contradictions, anomalies, impracticable functions and out-worn inheritances; but beyond all their practical shortcomings is their fragmentary character. An economic civilisation troubles itself about the universe much as a hive of honey-bees troubles about the ocean, only as a region to be avoided. The hive of Saint Thomas sheltered God and Man, Mind and Matter, The Universe and the Atom, the One and the Multiple, within the walls of a harmonious home.

„Perhaps some day — say 1938, their centenary — they might be allowed to return together for a holiday, to see the mistakes of their own lives made clear in the light of the mistakes of their successors; and perhaps then, for the first time since man began his education among the carnivores, they would find a world that sensitive and timid natures could regard without a shudder.“

—  Henry Adams

The closing lines of the book.
Contexto: It was time to go. The three friends had begun life together; and the last of the three had no motive — no attraction — to carry it on after the others had gone. Education had ended for all three, and only beyond some remoter horizon could its values be fixed or renewed. Perhaps some day — say 1938, their centenary — they might be allowed to return together for a holiday, to see the mistakes of their own lives made clear in the light of the mistakes of their successors; and perhaps then, for the first time since man began his education among the carnivores, they would find a world that sensitive and timid natures could regard without a shudder.

„At best, the renewal of broken relations is a nervous matter,“

—  Henry Adams

Contexto: As was sure, sooner or later, to happen, Adams one day met Charles Sumner on the street, and instantly stopped to greet him. As though eight years of broken ties were the natural course of friendship, Sumner at once, after an exclamation of surprise, dropped back into the relation of hero to the school boy. Adams enjoyed accepting it. He was then thirty years old and Sumner was fifty-seven; he had seen more of the world than Sumner ever dreamed of, and he felt a sort of amused curiosity to be treated once more as a child. At best, the renewal of broken relations is a nervous matter, and in this case it bristled with thorns.

„The effort is as evident and quite as laborious in modern science, starting as it does from multiplicity, as in Thomas Aquinas who started from unity, and it is necessarily less successful, for its true aims as far as it is Science and not disguised Religion, were equally attained by reaching infinite complexity; but the assertion or assumption of ultimate unity has characterised the Law of Energy as emphatically as it has characterised the definition of God in Theology. If it is a reproach to Saint Thomas, it is equally a reproach to Clerk-Maxwell. In truth it is what most men admire in both — the power of broad and lofty generalisation.“

—  Henry Adams

Mont Saint Michel and Chartres (1904)
Contexto: ... the quality that arouses most surprise in Thomism is its astonishingly scientific method. [... ] Avowedly science has aimed at nothing but the reduction of multiplicity to unity, and has excommunicated, as though it were itself a Church, anyone who doubted or disputed its object, its method, or its results. The effort is as evident and quite as laborious in modern science, starting as it does from multiplicity, as in Thomas Aquinas who started from unity, and it is necessarily less successful, for its true aims as far as it is Science and not disguised Religion, were equally attained by reaching infinite complexity; but the assertion or assumption of ultimate unity has characterised the Law of Energy as emphatically as it has characterised the definition of God in Theology. If it is a reproach to Saint Thomas, it is equally a reproach to Clerk-Maxwell. In truth it is what most men admire in both — the power of broad and lofty generalisation.

„As educator, Jean Jacques was, in one respect, easily first; he erected a monument of warning against the Ego.“

—  Henry Adams

Contexto: As educator, Jean Jacques was, in one respect, easily first; he erected a monument of warning against the Ego. Since his time, and largely thanks to him, the Ego has steadily tended to efface itself, and, for purposes of model, to become a manikin on which the toilet of education is to be draped in order to show the fit or misfit of the clothes. The object of study is the garment, not the figure. The tailor adapts the manikin as well as the clothes to his patron's wants. The tailor's object, in this volume, is to fit young men, in universities or elsewhere, to be men of the world, equipped for any emergency; and the garment offered to them is meant to show the faults of the patchwork fitted on their fathers.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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