Frases de James Watt

James Watt Foto
0  0

James Watt

Fecha de nacimiento: 19. Enero 1736
Fecha de muerte: 25. Agosto 1819

Anuncio

James Watt fue un ingeniero mecánico e inventor escocés. Las mejoras que realizó en la máquina de Newcomen dieron lugar a la conocida como máquina de vapor de agua, que resultaría fundamental en el desarrollo de la primera Revolución Industrial, tanto en el Reino Unido como en el resto del mundo.[1]​

Mientras trabajaba fabricando instrumentos en la Universidad de Glasgow, Watt se interesó en la tecnología de las máquinas de vapor y se percató de que los diseños coetáneos desperdiciaban una gran cantidad de energía enfriando y calentando repetidamente el cilindro. Watt introdujo una mejora en el diseño, el condensador separado, que evitaba la pérdida de energía y mejoró radicalmente la potencia, eficiencia y rentabilidad de las máquinas de vapor. Finalmente adaptó este motor para producir un movimiento rotatorio, lo que amplió enormemente su uso más allá del simple bombeo de agua.

Watt intentó comercializar su invento, pero encontró muchas dificultades financieras hasta que se asoció con Matthew Boulton en 1775. La nueva firma Boulton & Watt llegó a tener gran éxito y ambos se enriquecieron. Una vez jubilado, Watt continuó inventando, pero ninguna de sus últimas creaciones fue tan destacada como la mejora de la máquina de vapor. Watt también desarrolló el concepto de caballo de vapor,[2]​ mientras que la unidad de potencia del Sistema Internacional de Unidades, el vatio —W— fue nombrada en su honor.

Autores similares

 Herón Foto
Herón1
uso de la fisica : moviiento
John Stuart Mill Foto
John Stuart Mill21
filósofo, político y economista inglés
Boris Vian Foto
Boris Vian30
escritor francés
Nikola Tesla Foto
Nikola Tesla19
inventor, ingeniero mecánico e ingeniero eléctrico de ori...

Frases James Watt

„In Newcomen's engine, the piston is kept tight by water“

— James Watt
Context: In Newcomen's engine, the piston is kept tight by water, which could not be applicable in this new method; as, if any of it entered into a partially-exhausted and hot cylinder, it would boil, and prevent the production of a vacuum, and would also cool the cylinder by its evaporation during the descent of the piston. I proposed to remedy this defect by employing wax, tallow, or other grease, to lubricate and keep the piston tight. It next occurred to me, that the mouth of the cylinder being open, the air which entered to act on the piston would cool the cylinder, and condense some steam on again filling it. I therefore proposed to put an air-tight cover upon the cylinder, with a hole and stuffing-box for the piston-rod to slide through, and to admit steam above the piston to act upon it, instead of the atmosphere.... There still remained another source of the destruction of steam, the cooling of the cylinder by the external air, which would produce an internal condensation whenever steam entered it, and which would be repeated every stroke; this I proposed to remedy by an external cylinder, containing steam, surrounded by another of wood, or of some other substance which would conduct heat slowly.

„It now appeared that the cylinder of the model, being of brass, would conduct heat much better than the cast-iron cylinders of larger engines,“

— James Watt
Context: In the winter of 1763-4, having occasion to repair a model of Newcomen's engine belonging to the Natural Philosophy class of the University of Glasgow, my mind was again directed to it. At that period my knowledge was derived principally from Desaguliers, and partly from Belidor. I set about repairing it as a mere mechanician; and when that was done, and it was set to work, I was surprised to find that its boiler could not supply it with steam, though apparently quite large enough... By blowing the fire it was made to take a few strokes, but required an enormous quantity of injection water, though it was very lightly loaded by the column of water in the pump. It soon occurred that this was caused by the little cylinder exposing a greater surface to condense the steam, than the cylinders of larger engines did in proportion to their respective contents. It was found that by shortening the column of water in the pump, the boiler could supply the cylinder with steam, and that the engine would work regularly with a moderate quantity of injection. It now appeared that the cylinder of the model, being of brass, would conduct heat much better than the cast-iron cylinders of larger engines, (generally covered on the inside with a stony crust), and that considerable advantage could be gained by making the cylinders of some substance that would receive and give out heat slowly. Of these, wood seemed to be the most likely, provided it should prove sufficiently durable. A small engine was, therefore, constructed... made of wood, soaked in linseed oil, and baked to dryness. With this engine many experiments were made; but it was soon found that the wooden cylinder was not likely to prove durable, and that the steam condensed in filling it still exceeded the proportion of that required for large engines, according to the statements of Desaguliers. It was also found that all attempts to produce a better exhaustion by throwing in more injection, caused a disproportionate waste of steam. On reflection, the cause of this seemed to be the boiling of water in vacuo at low heats, a discovery lately made by Dr. Cullen and some other philosophers... and consequently at greater heats, the water in the cylinder would, produce a steam which would in part resist the pressure of the atmosphere.

Anuncio

„I proposed to remedy this defect by employing wax, tallow, or other grease, to lubricate and keep the piston tight. It next occurred to me“

— James Watt
Context: In Newcomen's engine, the piston is kept tight by water, which could not be applicable in this new method; as, if any of it entered into a partially-exhausted and hot cylinder, it would boil, and prevent the production of a vacuum, and would also cool the cylinder by its evaporation during the descent of the piston. I proposed to remedy this defect by employing wax, tallow, or other grease, to lubricate and keep the piston tight. It next occurred to me, that the mouth of the cylinder being open, the air which entered to act on the piston would cool the cylinder, and condense some steam on again filling it. I therefore proposed to put an air-tight cover upon the cylinder, with a hole and stuffing-box for the piston-rod to slide through, and to admit steam above the piston to act upon it, instead of the atmosphere.... There still remained another source of the destruction of steam, the cooling of the cylinder by the external air, which would produce an internal condensation whenever steam entered it, and which would be repeated every stroke; this I proposed to remedy by an external cylinder, containing steam, surrounded by another of wood, or of some other substance which would conduct heat slowly.

„It is not worth my while to manufacture in three countries only; but I can find it very worthwhile to make it for the whole world.“

— James Watt
Attributed to James Watt in: Joel Mokyr, The lever of riches: Technological creativity and economic progress. Oxford University Press, 1992. p, 245

„About the year 1761, or 1762, I tried some experiments on the force of steam in a Papin's digester, and formed a species of steam-engine by fixing upon it a syringe, one-third of an inch diameter, with a solid piston, and furnished also with a cock to admit the steam from the digester, or shut it off at pleasure, as well as to open a communication from the inside of the syringe to the open air, by which the steam contained in the syringe might escape. When the communication between the digester and syringe was opened, the steam entered the syringe, and by its action upon the piston raised a considerable weight (15 lbs.) with which it was loaded. When this was raised as high as was thought proper, the communication with the digester was shut, and that with the atmosphere opened; the steam then made its escape, and the weight descended. The operations were repeated, and, though in this experiment the cock was turned by hand, it was easy to see how it could be done by the machine itself, and to make it work with perfect regularity. But I soon relinquished the idea of constructing an engine upon its principle, from being sensible it would be liable to some of the objections against Savery's engine, viz., the danger of bursting the boiler, and the difficulty of making the joints tight, and also that a great part of the power of the steam would be lost, because no vacuum was formed to assist the descent of the piston. I, however, described this engine in the fourth article of the specification of my patent of 1769; and again in the specification of another patent in the year 1784, together with a mode of applying it to the moving of wheel-carriages.“

— James Watt

„I can think of nothing else than this machine.“

— James Watt
in a letter to a friend, Dr. Lind, April 29, 1765.

Aniversarios de hoy
José Joaquín de Olmedo Foto
José Joaquín de Olmedo8
Abogado, escritor y político guayaquileño. (Guayaquil, 2... 1780 - 1847
 Ovidio Foto
Ovidio20
poeta en lengua latina -43 - 17 a.C.
Iñaki Azkuna Foto
Iñaki Azkuna6
político de España 1943 - 2014
Otros (number)s aniversarios hoy
Autores similares
 Herón Foto
Herón1
uso de la fisica : moviiento
James Clerk Maxwell Foto
James Clerk Maxwell14
físico escocés
John Stuart Mill Foto
John Stuart Mill21
filósofo, político y economista inglés