Frases de Adam Smith

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Adam Smith

Fecha de nacimiento: 5. Junio 1723
Fecha de muerte: 17. Julio 1790

Adam Smith fue un economista y filósofo escocés, uno de los mayores exponentes de la economía clásica.

Adam Smith basaba su ideario en el sentido común. Frente al escepticismo, defendía el acceso cotidiano e inmediato a un mundo exterior independiente de la conciencia. Smith creía que el fundamento de la acción moral no se basa en normas ni en ideas nacionales, sino en sentimientos universales, comunes y propios de todos los seres humanos.

En 1776, publicó La riqueza de las naciones, sosteniendo que la riqueza procede del trabajo de la nación. El libro fue esencialmente un estudio acerca del proceso de creación y acumulación de la riqueza, temas ya abordados por los mercantilistas y fisiócratas, pero sin el carácter científico de la obra de Smith. Gracias a este trabajo, que fue el primer estudio completo y sistemático del tema, Smith se conoce como el padre de la economía.

Frases Adam Smith

„No es por la benevolencia del carnicero, del cervecero y del panadero que podemos contar con nuestra cena, sino por su propio interés.“

—  Adam Smith

Fuente: Citado en Amate Pou, Jordi.Paseando por una parte de la Historia: Antología de citas. Editorial Caligrama, 2017. ISBN 9788417321871. p. 43.
Fuente: La riqueza de las naciones

„En realidad, la atracción o el afecto no son más que simpatía de la costumbre.“

—  Adam Smith

Fuente: Citado en Amate Pou, Jordi.Paseando por una parte de la Historia: Antología de citas. Editorial Caligrama, 2017. ISBN 9788417321871. p. 42.

„No puede haber una sociedad floreciente y feliz cuando la mayor parte de sus miembros son pobres y desdichados.“

—  Adam Smith

Fuente: Smith, Adam.La riqueza de las naciones, Libro I, Capítulo 8: De los salarios del trabajo, página 94.
Fuente: La riqueza de las naciones.

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„Lands for the purposes of pleasure and magnificence“

—  Adam Smith

Fuente: The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book V, Chapter II, Part I, p. 891.
Contexto: Lands for the purposes of pleasure and magnificence, parks, gardens, public walks, &c. possessions which are every where considered as causes of expence, not as sources of revenue, seem to be the only lands which, in a great and civilized monarchy, ought to belong the crown.

„They say nothing concerning the bad effects of high profits. They are silent with regard to the pernicious effects of their own gains. They complain only of those of other people.“

—  Adam Smith

Fuente: The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book I, Chapter IX, p. 117.
Contexto: Our merchants and master-manufacturers complain much of the bad effects of high wages in raising the price, and thereby lessening the sale of their goods both at home and abroad. They say nothing concerning the bad effects of high profits. They are silent with regard to the pernicious effects of their own gains. They complain only of those of other people.

„The proper performance of those several duties of the sovereign necessarily supposes a certain expence; and this expence again necessarily requires a certain revenue to support it.“

—  Adam Smith

Fuente: The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book IV, Chapter IX, p. 749.
Contexto: Every system which endeavours, either, by extraordinary encouragements, to draw towards a particular species of industry a greater share of the capital of the society than what would naturally go to it; or, by extraordinary restraints, to force from a particular species of industry some share of the capital which would otherwise be employed in it; is in reality subversive of the great purpose which it means to promote. It retards, instead of accelerating, the progress of the society towards real wealth and greatness; and diminishes, instead of increasing, the real value of the annual produce of its land and labour.
All systems either of preference or of restraint, therefore, being thus completely taken away, the obvious and simple system of natural liberty establishes itself of its own accord. Every man, as long as he does not violate the laws of justice, is left perfectly free to pursue his own interest his own way, and to bring both his industry and capital into competition with those of any other man, or order of men. The sovereign is completely discharged from a duty, in the attempting to perform which he must always be exposed to innumerable delusions, and for the proper performance of which no human wisdom or knowledge could ever be sufficient; the duty of superintending the industry of private people, and of directing it towards the employments most suitable to the interest of the society. According to the system of natural liberty, the sovereign has only three duties to attend to; three duties of great importance, indeed, but plain and intelligible to common understandings: first, the duty of protecting the society from the violence and invasion of other independent societies; secondly, the duty of protecting, as far as possible, every member of the society from the injustice or oppression of every other member of it, or the duty of establishing an exact administration of justice; and, thirdly, the duty of erecting and maintaining certain public works and certain public institutions, which it can never be for the interest of any individual, or small number of individuals, to erect and maintain; because the profit could never repay the expence to any individual, or small number of individuals, though it may frequently do much more than repay it to a great society.
The proper performance of those several duties of the sovereign necessarily supposes a certain expence; and this expence again necessarily requires a certain revenue to support it.

„But whoever imagines, upon this account, that masters rarely combine, is as“

—  Adam Smith

Fuente: The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book I, Chapter VIII, p. 80.
Contexto: We rarely hear, it has been said, of the combinations of masters, though frequently of those of the workman. But whoever imagines, upon this account, that masters rarely combine, is as ignorant of the world as of the subject.

„When the happiness or misery of others depends in any respect upon our conduct, we dare not, as self–love might suggest to us, prefer the interest of one to that of many. The man within immediately calls to us, that we value ourselves too much and other people too little, and that, by doing so, we render ourselves the proper object of the contempt and indignation of our brethren.“

—  Adam Smith, libro The Theory of Moral Sentiments

Chap. III.
The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), Part III
Contexto: When the happiness or misery of others depends in any respect upon our conduct, we dare not, as self–love might suggest to us, prefer the interest of one to that of many. The man within immediately calls to us, that we value ourselves too much and other people too little, and that, by doing so, we render ourselves the proper object of the contempt and indignation of our brethren. Neither is this sentiment confined to men of extraordinary magnanimity and virtue. It is deeply impressed upon every tolerably good soldier, who feels that he would become the scorn of his companions, if he could be supposed capable of shrinking from danger, or of hesitating, either to expose or to throw away his life, when the good of the service required it.

„Labour, therefore, is the real measure of the exchangeable value of all commodities“

—  Adam Smith

Fuente: The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book I, Chapter V.
Contexto: Every man is rich or poor according to the degree in which he can afford to enjoy the necessaries, conveniences, and amusements of human life. But after the division of labour has once thoroughly taken place, it is but a very small part of these with which a man's own labour can supply him. The far greater part of them he must derive from the labour of other people, and he must be rich or poor according to the quantity of that labour which he can command, or which he can afford to purchase. The value of any commodity, therefore, to the person who possesses it, and who means not to use or consume it himself, but to exchange it for other commodities, is equal to the quantity of labour which it enables him to purchase or command. Labour, therefore, is the real measure of the exchangeable value of all commodities.

„Every system which endeavours, either, by extraordinary encouragements, to draw towards a particular species of industry a greater share of the capital of the society than what would naturally go to it; or, by extraordinary restraints, to force from a particular species of industry some share of the capital which would otherwise be employed in it; is in reality subversive of the great purpose which it means to promote.“

—  Adam Smith

Fuente: The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book IV, Chapter IX, p. 749.
Contexto: Every system which endeavours, either, by extraordinary encouragements, to draw towards a particular species of industry a greater share of the capital of the society than what would naturally go to it; or, by extraordinary restraints, to force from a particular species of industry some share of the capital which would otherwise be employed in it; is in reality subversive of the great purpose which it means to promote. It retards, instead of accelerating, the progress of the society towards real wealth and greatness; and diminishes, instead of increasing, the real value of the annual produce of its land and labour.
All systems either of preference or of restraint, therefore, being thus completely taken away, the obvious and simple system of natural liberty establishes itself of its own accord. Every man, as long as he does not violate the laws of justice, is left perfectly free to pursue his own interest his own way, and to bring both his industry and capital into competition with those of any other man, or order of men. The sovereign is completely discharged from a duty, in the attempting to perform which he must always be exposed to innumerable delusions, and for the proper performance of which no human wisdom or knowledge could ever be sufficient; the duty of superintending the industry of private people, and of directing it towards the employments most suitable to the interest of the society. According to the system of natural liberty, the sovereign has only three duties to attend to; three duties of great importance, indeed, but plain and intelligible to common understandings: first, the duty of protecting the society from the violence and invasion of other independent societies; secondly, the duty of protecting, as far as possible, every member of the society from the injustice or oppression of every other member of it, or the duty of establishing an exact administration of justice; and, thirdly, the duty of erecting and maintaining certain public works and certain public institutions, which it can never be for the interest of any individual, or small number of individuals, to erect and maintain; because the profit could never repay the expence to any individual, or small number of individuals, though it may frequently do much more than repay it to a great society.
The proper performance of those several duties of the sovereign necessarily supposes a certain expence; and this expence again necessarily requires a certain revenue to support it.

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