Frases de Adam Smith

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Adam Smith

Fecha de nacimiento: 5. Junio 1723
Fecha de muerte: 17. Julio 1790

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Adam Smith fue un economista y filósofo escocés, uno de los mayores exponentes de la economía clásica.

Adam Smith basaba su ideario en el sentido común. Frente al escepticismo, defendía el acceso cotidiano e inmediato a un mundo exterior independiente de la conciencia. Smith creía que el fundamento de la acción moral no se basa en normas ni en ideas nacionales, sino en sentimientos universales, comunes y propios de todos los seres humanos.

En 1776, publicó La riqueza de las naciones, sosteniendo que la riqueza procede del trabajo de la nación. El libro fue esencialmente un estudio acerca del proceso de creación y acumulación de la riqueza, temas ya abordados por los mercantilistas y fisiócratas, pero sin el carácter científico de la obra de Smith. Gracias a este trabajo, que fue el primer estudio completo y sistemático del tema, Smith se conoce como el padre de la economía.

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Frases Adam Smith

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„En realidad, la atracción o el afecto no son más que simpatía de la costumbre.“

—  Adam Smith
Source: Citado en Amate Pou, Jordi.Paseando por una parte de la Historia: Antología de citas. Editorial Caligrama, 2017. ISBN 9788417321871. p. 42.

„No es por la benevolencia del carnicero, del cervecero y del panadero que podemos contar con nuestra cena, sino por su propio interés.“

—  Adam Smith
Source: Citado en Amate Pou, Jordi.Paseando por una parte de la Historia: Antología de citas. Editorial Caligrama, 2017. ISBN 9788417321871. p. 43. Fuente: La riqueza de las naciones

„No puede haber una sociedad floreciente y feliz cuando la mayor parte de sus miembros son pobres y desdichados.“

—  Adam Smith
Source: Smith, Adam.La riqueza de las naciones, Libro I, Capítulo 8: De los salarios del trabajo, página 94. Fuente: La riqueza de las naciones.

„The value which the workmen add“

—  Adam Smith
The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book I, Context: The value which the workmen add to the materials, therefore, resolves itself in this case into two parts, of which the one pays their wages, the other the profits of the employer upon the whole stock of materials and wages which he advanced. Chapter VI, p. 58.

„They say nothing concerning the bad effects of high profits. They are silent with regard to the pernicious effects of their own gains. They complain only of those of other people.“

—  Adam Smith
The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book I, Context: Our merchants and master-manufacturers complain much of the bad effects of high wages in raising the price, and thereby lessening the sale of their goods both at home and abroad. They say nothing concerning the bad effects of high profits. They are silent with regard to the pernicious effects of their own gains. They complain only of those of other people. Chapter IX, p. 117.

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„It comes from an order of men, whose interest is never exactly the same with that of the public, who have generally an interest to deceive and even to oppress the public“

—  Adam Smith
The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book I, Context: The proposal of any new law or regulation of commerce which comes from this order, ought always to be listened to with great precaution, and ought never to be adopted till after having been long and carefully examined, not only with the most scrupulous, but with the most suspicious attention. It comes from an order of men, whose interest is never exactly the same with that of the public, who have generally an interest to deceive and even to oppress the public, and who accordingly have, upon many occasions, both deceived and oppressed it. Chapter XI, Part III, Conclusion of the Chapter, p. 292.

„Whenever the legislature attempts to regulate the differences between masters and their“

—  Adam Smith
The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book I, Context: Whenever the legislature attempts to regulate the differences between masters and their workmen, its counsellors are always the masters. When the regulation, therefore, is in favor of the workmen, it is always just and equitable; but it is sometimes otherwise when in favor of the masters. Chapter x, Part II, p. 168.

„Money, says the proverb, makes money.“

—  Adam Smith
The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book I, Context: A great stock, though with small profits, generally increases faster than a small stock with great profits. Money, says the proverb, makes money. When you have a little, it is often easier to get more. The great difficulty is to get that little. Chapter IX, p. 111.

„Each person, therefore, making a tenth part of forty-eight thousand pins, might be considered as making four thousand eight hundred pins in a day. But if they had all wrought separately and independently, and without any of them having been educated to this peculiar business, they certainly could not each of them have made twenty, perhaps not one pin in a day; that is, certainly, not the two hundred and fortieth, perhaps not the four thousand eight hundredth, part of what they are at present capable of performing, in consequence of a proper division and combination of their different operations.“

—  Adam Smith
The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book I, Context: To take an example, therefore, from a very trifling manufacture, but one in which the division of labour has been very often taken notice of, the trade of a pin-maker: a workman not educated to this business (which the division of labour has rendered a distinct trade, nor acquainted with the use of the machinery employed in it (to the invention of which the same division of labour has probably given occasion), could scarce, perhaps, with his utmost industry, make one pin in a day, and certainly could not make twenty. But in the way in which this business is now carried on, not only the whole work is a peculiar trade, but it is divided into a number of branches, of which the greater part are likewise peculiar trades. One man draws out the wire; another straights it; a third cuts it; a fourth points it; a fifth grinds it at the top for receiving the head; to make the head requires two or three distinct operations; to put it on is a peculiar business; to whiten the pins is another; it is even a trade by itself to put them into the paper; and the important business of making a pin is, in this manner, divided into about eighteen distinct operations, which, in some manufactories, are all performed by distinct hands, though in others the same man will sometimes perform two or three of them. I have seen a small manufactory of this kind, where ten men only were employed, and where some of them consequently performed two or three distinct operations. But though they were very poor, and therefore but indifferently accommodated with the necessary machinery, they could, when they exerted themselves, make among them about twelve pounds of pins in a day. There are in a pound upwards of four thousand pins of a middling size. Those ten persons, therefore, could make among them upwards of forty-eight thousand pins in a day. Each person, therefore, making a tenth part of forty-eight thousand pins, might be considered as making four thousand eight hundred pins in a day. But if they had all wrought separately and independently, and without any of them having been educated to this peculiar business, they certainly could not each of them have made twenty, perhaps not one pin in a day; that is, certainly, not the two hundred and fortieth, perhaps not the four thousand eight hundredth, part of what they are at present capable of performing, in consequence of a proper division and combination of their different operations. Chapter I, p. 8-9.

„By the removal of the unnecessary mouths“

—  Adam Smith
The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book III, Context: By the removal of the unnecessary mouths, and by extracting from the farmer the full value of the farm, a greater surplus, or what is the same thing, the price of a greater surplus, was obtained for the proprietor... Chapter IV, p. 450 (On Highland Clearances).

„It is reason, principle, conscience, the inhabitant of the breast, the man within, the great judge and arbiter of our conduct.“

—  Adam Smith, The Theory of Moral Sentiments
The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), Part III, Context: Let us suppose that the great empire of China, with all its myriads of inhabitants, was suddenly swallowed up by an earthquake, and let us consider how a man of humanity in Europe, who had no sort of connection with that part of the world, would be affected upon receiving intelligence of this dreadful calamity. He would, I imagine, first of all, express very strongly his sorrow for the misfortune of that unhappy people, he would make many melancholy reflections upon the precariousness of human life, and the vanity of all the labours of man, which could thus be annihilated in a moment. He would too, perhaps, if he was a man of speculation, enter into many reasonings concerning the effects which this disaster might produce upon the commerce of Europe, and the trade and business of the world in general. And when all this fine philosophy was over, when all these humane sentiments had been once fairly expressed, he would pursue his business or his pleasure, take his repose or his diversion, with the same ease and tranquillity, as if no such accident had happened. The most frivolous disaster which could befall himself would occasion a more real disturbance. If he was to lose his little finger to-morrow, he would not sleep to-night; but, provided he never saw them, he will snore with the most profound security over the ruin of a hundred millions of his brethren, and the destruction of that immense multitude seems plainly an object less interesting to him, than this paltry misfortune of his own. To prevent, therefore, this paltry misfortune to himself, would a man of humanity be willing to sacrifice the lives of a hundred millions of his brethren, provided he had never seen them? Human nature startles with horror at the thought, and the world, in its greatest depravity and corruption, never produced such a villain as could be capable of entertaining it. But what makes this difference? When our passive feelings are almost always so sordid and so selfish, how comes it that our active principles should often be so generous and so noble? When we are always so much more deeply affected by whatever concerns ourselves, than by whatever concerns other men; what is it which prompts the generous, upon all occasions, and the mean upon many, to sacrifice their own interests to the greater interests of others? It is not the soft power of humanity, it is not that feeble spark of benevolence which Nature has lighted up in the human heart, that is thus capable of counteracting the strongest impulses of self-love. It is a stronger power, a more forcible motive, which exerts itself upon such occasions. It is reason, principle, conscience, the inhabitant of the breast, the man within, the great judge and arbiter of our conduct. Chap. III.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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