Frases de John Donne

John Donne Foto
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John Donne

Fecha de nacimiento: 1572
Fecha de muerte: 31. Marzo 1631

John Donne fue el más importante poeta metafísico inglés de las épocas de la reina Isabel I , el rey Jacobo I y su hijo Carlos I . La poesía metafísica es más o menos el equivalente a la poesía conceptista del Siglo de Oro español de la que es contemporánea. Su obra incluye: poesía amorosa, religiosa, traducciones, epigramas, elegías según la tradición de imitación de los Amores de Ovidio , canciones y sermones en prosa. Wikipedia

Photo: Unknown author / Public domain

Frases John Donne

„… Nadie es una isla por completo en sí mismo; cada hombre es un pedazo de un continente, una parte de la Tierra. Si el mar se lleva una porción de tierra, toda Europa queda disminuida, como si fuera un promontorio, o la mansión de uno de tus amigos, o la tuya propia; por eso la muerte de cualquier hombre arranca algo de mi, porque estoy ligado a la humanidad; y por tanto, nunca preguntes por quién doblan las campanas, porque están doblando por ti…“

—  John Donne

Cita inicial en la novela Por quién doblan las campanas, de Ernest Hemingway.[Sin fuentes]
Original: «... No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main. If a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friend's or of thine own were: any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bells tolls; it tolls for thee...».
Variante: Nadie es una isla, completo en sí mismo; cada hombre es un pedazo de continente, una parte de la tierra.; si el mar se lleva una porción de tierra, toda Europa queda disminuida, como si fuera un promontorio, o la casa de uno de tus amigos, o la tuya propia. La muerte de cualquier hombre me disminuye porque estoy ligado a la humanidad; por consiguiente nunca hagas preguntar por quién doblan las campanas: doblan por ti.
Fuente: XVII. Meditation. Nunc lento sonitu dicunt, morieris. «Now, this bell tolling softly for another, says to me: Thou must die.»
Fuente: [Donne], John (en inglés). Devotions upon Emergent Occasions.... Ann Arbor Paperbacks/The University of Michigan Press, 1959. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23772/23772-h/23772-h.htm Project Gutenberg eBook. Consultado el 15 de septiembre de 2019.

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„La luz no tiene lengua.“

—  John Donne

Sin fuentes
Fuente: «El alba» (1612).

„No spring, nor summer beauty hath such grace,
As I have seen in one autumnal face.“

—  John Donne

No. 9, The Autumnal, line 1
Elegies
Fuente: The Complete Poetry and Selected Prose

„Be thine own palace, or the world's thy jail.“

—  John Donne

Fuente: The Poems of John Donne; Miscellaneous Poems (Songs and Sonnets) Elegies. Epithalamions, or Marriage Songs. Satires. Epigrams. the Progress of

„I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved?“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Contexto: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Contexto: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

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„They'are ours, though they'are not we“

—  John Donne

The Extasy, line 45
Contexto: We then, who are this new soul, know
Of what we are compos'd and made,
For th' atomies of which we grow
Are souls, whom no change can invade.
But oh alas, so long, so far,
Our bodies why do we forbear?
They'are ours, though they'are not we; we are
The intelligences, they the spheres.

„If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee.“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Contexto: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so,“

—  John Donne, libro Holy Sonnets

No. 10, line 1
Holy Sonnets (1633)
Contexto: Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so,
For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow,
Die not, poor death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

„For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Contexto: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Contexto: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„At the round earth's imagin'd corners, blow
Your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise“

—  John Donne, libro Holy Sonnets

No. 7, line 1
Holy Sonnets (1633)
Contexto: At the round earth's imagin'd corners, blow
Your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise
From death, you numberless infinities
Of souls, and to your scattred bodies go.

„Any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bells tolls; it tolls for thee.“

—  John Donne

Modern version: No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main; if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friends or of thine own were; any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.
Meditation 17. This was the source for the title of Ernest Hemingway's novel.
Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions (1624)
Fuente: Meditation XVII - Meditation 17
Contexto: No man is an Iland, intire of it selfe; every man is a peece of the Continent, a part of the maine; if a Clod bee washed away by the Sea, Europe is the lesse, as well as if a Promontorie were, as well as if a Mannor of thy friends or of thine owne were; any mans death diminishes me, because I am involved in Mankinde; And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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