Frases de John Dryden

John Dryden Foto
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John Dryden

Fecha de nacimiento: 9. Agosto 1631
Fecha de muerte: 1. Mayo 1700

John Dryden fue un influyente poeta, crítico literario y dramaturgo inglés, que dominó la vida literaria en la Inglaterra de la Restauración inglesa hasta tal punto que llegó a ser conocida como la Época de Dryden. Wikipedia

Frases John Dryden

„Midas me no midas.“

—  John Dryden

Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

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„In friendship false, implacable in hate,
Resolved to ruin or to rule the state.“

—  John Dryden, Absalom and Achitophel

Pt. I, lines 173–174.
Absalom and Achitophel (1681)

„How easie is it to call Rogue and Villain, and that wittily! But how hard to make a Man appear a Fool, a Blockhead, or a Knave, without using any of those opprobrious terms!“

—  John Dryden

A Discourse concerning the Original and Progress of Satire (1693).
Contexto: How easie is it to call Rogue and Villain, and that wittily! But how hard to make a Man appear a Fool, a Blockhead, or a Knave, without using any of those opprobrious terms! To spare the grossness of the Names, and to do the thing yet more severely, is to draw a full Face, and to make the Nose and Cheeks stand out, and yet not to employ any depth of Shadowing. This is the Mystery of that Noble Trade, which yet no Master can teach to his Apprentice: He may give the Rules, but the Scholar is never the nearer in his practice. Neither is it true, that this fineness of Raillery is offensive. A witty Man is tickl'd while he is hurt in this manner, and a Fool feels it not. The occasion of an Offence may possibly be given, but he cannot take it. If it be granted that in effect this way does more Mischief; that a Man is secretly wounded, and though he be not sensible himself, yet the malicious World will find it for him: yet there is still a vast difference betwixt the slovenly Butchering of a Man, and the fineness of a stroke that separates the Head from the Body, and leaves it standing in its place.

„Content with poverty, my soul I arm;
And virtue, though in rags, will keep me warm.“

—  John Dryden

On Fortune; Book III, Ode 29, lines 81–87.
Imitation of Horace (1685)
Contexto: I can enjoy her while she's kind;
But when she dances in the wind,
And shakes the wings and will not stay,
I puff the prostitute away:
The little or the much she gave is quietly resign'd:
Content with poverty, my soul I arm;
And virtue, though in rags, will keep me warm.

„From harmony, from heavenly harmony,
This universal frame began:
From harmony to harmony
Through all the compass of the notes it ran,
The diapason closing full in Man.“

—  John Dryden

St. 1.
A Song for St. Cecilia's Day http://www.englishverse.com/poems/a_song_for_st_cecilias_day_1687 (1687)
Contexto: From harmony, from heavenly harmony,
This universal frame began:
When nature underneath a heap
Of jarring atoms lay,
And could not heave her head,
The tuneful voice was heard from high,
'Arise, ye more than dead!'
Then cold, and hot, and moist, and dry,
In order to their stations leap,
And Music's power obey.
From harmony, from heavenly harmony,
This universal frame began:
From harmony to harmony
Through all the compass of the notes it ran,
The diapason closing full in Man.

„The wise, for cure, on exercise depend;
God never made his work for man to mend.“

—  John Dryden

Epistle to John Driden of Chesterton (1700), lines 92–95.
Contexto: Better to hunt in fields, for health unbought,
Than fee the doctor for a nauseous draught.
The wise, for cure, on exercise depend;
God never made his work for man to mend.

„I am as free as Nature first made man,
Ere the base laws of servitude began“

—  John Dryden, The Conquest of Granada

Part 1, Act I, scene i.
The Conquest of Granada (1669-1670)
Contexto: I am as free as Nature first made man,
Ere the base laws of servitude began,
When wild in woods the noble savage ran.

„If all the world be worth thy winning.
Think, oh think it worth enjoying:
Lovely Thaïs sits beside thee,
Take the good the gods provide thee.“

—  John Dryden

Fuente: Alexander’s Feast http://www.bartleby.com/40/265.html (1697), l. 97–106.
Contexto: Softly sweet, in Lydian measures,
Soon he soothed his soul to pleasures.
War, he sung, is toil and trouble;
Honor but an empty bubble;
Never ending, still beginning,
Fighting still, and still destroying.
If all the world be worth thy winning.
Think, oh think it worth enjoying:
Lovely Thaïs sits beside thee,
Take the good the gods provide thee.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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