Frases de John Dryden

John Dryden Foto
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John Dryden

Fecha de nacimiento: 19. Agosto 1631
Fecha de muerte: 12. Mayo 1700

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John Dryden fue un influyente poeta, crítico literario y dramaturgo inglés, que dominó la vida literaria en la Inglaterra de la Restauración inglesa hasta tal punto que llegó a ser conocida como la Época de Dryden.

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Frases John Dryden

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„It is almost impossible to translate verbally and well at the same time“

— John Dryden
Context: It is almost impossible to translate verbally and well at the same time; for the Latin (a most severe and compendious language) often expresses that in one word which either the barbarity or the narrowness of modern tongues cannot supply in more.... But since every language is so full of its own proprieties that what is beautiful in one is often barbarous, nay, sometimes nonsense, in another, it would be unreasonable to limit a translator to the narrow compass of his author's words; it is enough if he choose out some expression which does not vitiate the sense. Works of John Dryden (1803) as quoted by P. Fleury Mottelay in William Gilbert of Colchester (1893)

„Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learn'd; he needed not the spectacles of Books to read Nature; he look'd inwards, and found her there.“

— John Dryden
Context: To begin then with Shakespeare; he was the man who of all Modern, and perhaps Ancient Poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the Images of Nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learn'd; he needed not the spectacles of Books to read Nature; he look'd inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of Mankind. He is many times flat, insipid; his Comick wit degenerating into clenches; his serious swelling into Bombast. But he is alwayes great, when some great occasion is presented to him: no man can say he ever had a fit subject for his wit, and did not then raise himself as high above the rest of the Poets Essay of Dramatick Poesie (1668)

„To begin then with Shakespeare; he was the man who of all Modern, and perhaps Ancient Poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul.“

— John Dryden
Context: To begin then with Shakespeare; he was the man who of all Modern, and perhaps Ancient Poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the Images of Nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learn'd; he needed not the spectacles of Books to read Nature; he look'd inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of Mankind. He is many times flat, insipid; his Comick wit degenerating into clenches; his serious swelling into Bombast. But he is alwayes great, when some great occasion is presented to him: no man can say he ever had a fit subject for his wit, and did not then raise himself as high above the rest of the Poets Essay of Dramatick Poesie (1668)

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„Content with poverty, my soul I arm;
And virtue, though in rags, will keep me warm.“

— John Dryden
Context: I can enjoy her while she's kind; But when she dances in the wind, And shakes the wings and will not stay, I puff the prostitute away: The little or the much she gave is quietly resign'd: Content with poverty, my soul I arm; And virtue, though in rags, will keep me warm. On Fortune; Book III, Ode 29, lines 81–87.

„From harmony, from heavenly harmony,
This universal frame began:
From harmony to harmony
Through all the compass of the notes it ran,
The diapason closing full in Man.“

— John Dryden
Context: From harmony, from heavenly harmony, This universal frame began: When nature underneath a heap Of jarring atoms lay, And could not heave her head, The tuneful voice was heard from high, 'Arise, ye more than dead!' Then cold, and hot, and moist, and dry, In order to their stations leap, And Music's power obey. From harmony, from heavenly harmony, This universal frame began: From harmony to harmony Through all the compass of the notes it ran, The diapason closing full in Man. St. 1.

„The wise, for cure, on exercise depend;
God never made his work for man to mend.“

— John Dryden
Context: Better to hunt in fields, for health unbought, Than fee the doctor for a nauseous draught. The wise, for cure, on exercise depend; God never made his work for man to mend. Epistle to John Driden of Chesterton (1700), lines 92–95.

„I am as free as Nature first made man,
Ere the base laws of servitude began“

— John Dryden
Context: I am as free as Nature first made man, Ere the base laws of servitude began, When wild in woods the noble savage ran. Part 1, Act I, scene i.

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