Frases de Lord Acton

Lord Acton Foto
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Lord Acton

Fecha de nacimiento: 10. Enero 1834
Fecha de muerte: 19. Junio 1902

John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, 1.er Barón Acton, KCVO , conocido como Lord Acton, fue un historiador y político inglés. Católico y liberal,[1]​ es famoso por haber acuñado el conocido aforismo «El poder tiende a corromper y el poder absoluto corrompe absolutamente» .[2]​

Obras

Frases Lord Acton

„No te conformes con el mejor libro; busca las luces de los demás; no tengas favoritos.“

—  Lord Acton, Lectures on Modern History
Original: «Be not content with the best book; seek sidelights from the others; have no favourites». Fuente: Lectures on Modern History. John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton. Editorial Jazzybee Verlag, 2016. ISBN 9783849646127. https://books.google.es/books?id=u_xBDwAAQBAJ&pg=PT30&dq=Judge+talent+at+its+best+but+character+at+its+worst.+Lord+Acton&hl=es&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj1-92AgeTfAhWnBGMBHSrIAgkQ6AEIKDAA#v=onepage&q=Be%20not%20content%20with%20the%20best%20book%3B%20seek%20sidelights%20from%20the%20others%3B%20have%20no%20favourites&f=false

„Sospecha del poder más que del vicio y estudia los problemas con preferencia a los períodos.“

—  Lord Acton, Lectures on Modern History
Original: «Suspect power more than vice, and study problems in preference to periods». Fuente: Lectures on Modern History. John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton. Editorial Jazzybee Verlag, 2016. ISBN 9783849646127. https://books.google.es/books?id=u_xBDwAAQBAJ&pg=PT30&dq=Judge+talent+at+its+best+but+character+at+its+worst.+Lord+Acton&hl=es&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj1-92AgeTfAhWnBGMBHSrIAgkQ6AEIKDAA#v=onepage&q=Judge%20talent%20at%20its%20best%20but%20character%20at%20its%20worst.%20Lord%20Acton&f=false

„Aprende tanto escribiendo como leyendo.“

—  Lord Acton
Original: «Learn as much by writing as by reading». Fuente: Kundtz, David. Quiet Mind: One Minute Mindfulness. Colaborador Steven Harrison. Editorial Conari Press, 2003. ISBN 9781609250065. https://books.google.es/books?id=MY6QO42KvN0C&pg=PT64&dq=Learn+as+much+by+writing+as+by+reading.+Lord+Acton&hl=es&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiqjuy7_ePfAhUnBGMBHY1yCNcQ6AEIKzAA#v=onepage&q=Learn%20as%20much%20by%20writing%20as%20by%20reading.%20Lord%20Acton&f=false

„Cuando percibas una verdad, busca la verdad equilibrada.“

—  Lord Acton
Original: «When you perceive a truth, look for the balancing truth». Fuente: Thompson, Kenneth W. Traditions and Values in Politics and Diplomacy: Theory and Practice. Political Traditions in Foreign Policy Series. Editorial LSU Press, 1992. ISBN 9780807117460. Página 175. https://books.google.es/books?id=GgMNY_7j8ukC&pg=PA175&dq=When+you+perceive+a+truth,+look+for+the+balancing+truth.+Lord+Acton&hl=es&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj4n6bK_-PfAhWJMBQKHeQLDHUQ6AEILzAB#v=onepage&q=When%20you%20perceive%20a%20truth%2C%20look%20for%20the%20balancing%20truth.%20Lord%20Acton&f=false

„El poder tiende a corromper, el poder absoluto corrompe absolutamente. Los grandes hombres son casi siempre malos, incluso cuando ejercen influencia y no autoridad: aún más cuando superas la tendencia o la certeza de corrupción por autoridad.“

—  Lord Acton
Original: «Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men, even when they exercise influence and not authority: still more when you superadd the tendency or the certainty of corruption by authority». Fuente: Hill, Roland. Lord Acton. Edición ilustrada. Editorial Yale University Press, 2000. ISBN 9780300129809. Página 300. https://books.google.es/books?id=K6haxnN0GX8C&pg=PA300&dq=Power+tends+to+corrupt,+and+absolute+power+corrupts+absolutely.+Great+men+are+almost+always+bad+men.+Lord+Acton&hl=es&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjf7fzC_uPfAhUF0uAKHaVXCm4Q6AEIKDAA#v=onepage&q=Power%20tends%20to%20corrupt%2C%20and%20absolute%20power%20corrupts%20absolutely.%20Great%20men%20are%20almost%20always%20bad%20men.%20Lord%20Acton&f=false

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„Juzga el talento en su mejor momento, pero el carácter en el peor.“

—  Lord Acton, Lectures on Modern History
Original: «Judge talent at its best but character at its worst». Fuente: Lectures on Modern History. John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton. Editorial Jazzybee Verlag, 2016. ISBN 9783849646127. https://books.google.es/books?id=u_xBDwAAQBAJ&pg=PT30&dq=Judge+talent+at+its+best+but+character+at+its+worst.+Lord+Acton&hl=es&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj1-92AgeTfAhWnBGMBHSrIAgkQ6AEIKDAA#v=onepage&q=Judge%20talent%20at%20its%20best%20but%20character%20at%20its%20worst.%20Lord%20Acton&f=false

„La limitación es esencial a la autoridad, pues un gobierno sólo es legítimo si está efectivamente limitado.“

—  Lord Acton
Source: Rallo, Juan Ramón. Una revolución liberal para España: Anatomía de un país libre y próspero: ¿cómo sería y qué beneficios obtendríamos?. Editorial Grupo Planeta Spain, 2014. ISBN 9788423418992.

„It is bad to be oppressed by a minority, but it is worse to be oppressed by a majority. For there is a reserve of latent power in the masses which, if it is called into play, the minority can seldom resist.“

—  John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton
The History of Freedom in Antiquity (1877), Context: It is bad to be oppressed by a minority, but it is worse to be oppressed by a majority. For there is a reserve of latent power in the masses which, if it is called into play, the minority can seldom resist. But from the absolute will of an entire people there is no appeal, no redemption, no refuge but treason.

„Seeing how little was done by the wisdom of former times for education and public health, for insurance, association, and savings, for the protection of labour against the law of self-interest, and how much has been accomplished in this generation, there is reason in the fixed belief that a great change was needed, and that democracy has not striven in vain. Liberty, for the mass, is not happiness; and institutions are not an end but a means.“

—  John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton
Review of Democracy in Europe (1878), Context: The manifest, the avowed difficulty is that democracy, no less than monarchy or aristocracy, sacrifices everything to maintain itself, and strives, with an energy and a plausibility that kings and nobles cannot attain, to override representation, to annul all the forces of resistance and deviation, and to secure, by Plebiscite, Referendum, or Caucus, free play for the will of the majority. The true democratic principle, that none shall have power over the people, is taken to mean that none shall be able to restrain or to elude its power. The true democratic principle, that the people shall not be made to do what it does not like, is taken to mean that it shall never be required to tolerate what it does not like. The true democratic principle, that every man‘s free will shall be as unfettered as possible, is taken to mean that the free will of the collective people shall be fettered in nothing. Religious toleration, judicial independence, dread of centralisation, jealousy of State interference, become obstacles to freedom instead of safeguards, when the centralised force of the State is wielded by the hands of the people. Democracy claims to be not only supreme, without authority above, but absolute, without independence below; to be its own master, not a trustee. The old sovereigns of the world are exchanged for a new one, who may be flattered and deceived, but whom it is impossible to corrupt or to resist, and to whom must be rendered the things that are Caesar's and also the things that are God’s. The enemy to be overcome is no longer the absolutism of the State, but the liberty of the subject. Nothing is more significant than the relish with which Ferrari, the most powerful democratic writer since Rousseau, enumerates the merits of tyrants, and prefers devils to saints in the interest of the community. For the old notions of civil liberty and of social order did not benefit the masses of the people. Wealth increased, without relieving their wants. The progress of knowledge left them in abject ignorance. Religion flourished, but failed to reach them. Society, whose laws were made by the upper class alone, announced that the best thing for the poor is not to be born, and the next best to die in childhood, and suffered them to live in misery and crime and pain. As surely as the long reign of the rich has been employed in promoting the accumulation of wealth, the advent of the poor to power will be followed by schemes for diffusing it. Seeing how little was done by the wisdom of former times for education and public health, for insurance, association, and savings, for the protection of labour against the law of self-interest, and how much has been accomplished in this generation, there is reason in the fixed belief that a great change was needed, and that democracy has not striven in vain. Liberty, for the mass, is not happiness; and institutions are not an end but a means. The thing they seek is a force sufficient to sweep away scruples and the obstacle of rival interests, and, in some degree, to better their condition. They mean that the strong hand that heretofore has formed great States, protected religions, and defended the independence of nations, shall help them by preserving life, and endowing it for them with some, at least, of the things men live for. That is the notorious danger of modern democracy. That is also its purpose and its strength. And against this threatening power the weapons that struck down other despots do not avail. The greatest happiness principle positively confirms it. The principle of equality, besides being as easily applied to property as to power, opposes the existence of persons or groups of persons exempt from the common law, and independent of the common will; and the principle, that authority is a matter of contract, may hold good against kings, but not against the sovereign people, because a contract implies two parties.

„The way was paved for absolute monarchy to triumph over the spirit and institutions of a better age, not by isolated acts of wickedness, but by a studied philosophy of crime“

—  John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton
The History of Freedom in Christianity (1877), Context: The way was paved for absolute monarchy to triumph over the spirit and institutions of a better age, not by isolated acts of wickedness, but by a studied philosophy of crime, and so thorough a perversion of the moral sense that the like of it had not been since the Stoics reformed the morality of paganism. The clergy who had in so many ways served the cause of freedom during the prolonged strife against feudalism and slavery, were associated now with the interest of royalty.

„The one pervading evil of democracy is the tyranny of the majority, or rather of that party, not always the majority, that succeeds, by force or fraud, in carrying elections.“

—  John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton
Review of Democracy in Europe (1878), Context: The one pervading evil of democracy is the tyranny of the majority, or rather of that party, not always the majority, that succeeds, by force or fraud, in carrying elections. To break off that point is to avert the danger. The common system of representation perpetuates the danger. Unequal electorates afford no security to majorities. Equal electorates give none to minorities. Thirty-five years ago it was pointed out that the remedy is proportional representation. It is profoundly democratic, for it increases the influence of thousands who would otherwise have no voice in the government; and it brings men more near an equality by so contriving that no vote shall be wasted, and that every voter shall contribute to bring into Parliament a member of his own opinions.

„Before God, there is neither Greek nor barbarian, neither rich nor poor; and the slave is as good as his master, for by birth all men are free“

—  John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton
The History of Freedom in Antiquity (1877), Context: Before God, there is neither Greek nor barbarian, neither rich nor poor; and the slave is as good as his master, for by birth all men are free; they are citizens of that universal commonwealth which embraces all the world, brethren of one family, and children of God.

„No obstacle has been so constant, or so difficult to overcome, as uncertainty and confusion touching the nature of true liberty.“

—  John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton
The History of Freedom in Antiquity (1877), Context: No obstacle has been so constant, or so difficult to overcome, as uncertainty and confusion touching the nature of true liberty. If hostile interests have wrought much injury, false ideas have wrought still more; and its advance is recorded in the increase of knowledge, as much as in the improvement of laws.<!--p.2

„That men should understand that governments do not exist by divine right, and that arbitrary government is the violation of divine right, was no doubt the medicine suited to the malady under which Europe languished.“

—  John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton
The History of Freedom in Christianity (1877), Context: That men should understand that governments do not exist by divine right, and that arbitrary government is the violation of divine right, was no doubt the medicine suited to the malady under which Europe languished. But although the knowledge of this truth might become an element of salutary destruction, it could give little aid to progress and reform. Resistance to tyranny implied no faculty of constructing a legal government in its place. Tyburn tree may be a useful thing; but it is better still that the offender should live for repentance and reformation. The principles which discriminate in politics between good and evil, and make states worthy to last, were not yet found.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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