Frases de Septimio Severo

Septimio Severo Foto
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Septimio Severo

Fecha de nacimiento: 11. Abril 146
Fecha de muerte: 4. Febrero 211

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Lucio Septimio Severo fue emperador del Imperio romano de 193 a 211, con el nombre oficial de Lucius Septimius Severus Pius Pertinax Augustus. Fue el primer emperador romano de origen norteafricano en alcanzar el trono, y el fundador de la Dinastía de los Severos. Tras su muerte fue proclamado Divus por el Senado.

De ascendencia italiana , y púnica-bereber , Severo logró hacerse sitio en la sociedad romana e incluso tener una próspera carrera política en la que llegó a ser gobernador de Panonia. Ya que su padre no pertenecía al orden senatorial, ni realizó servicios al Estado, no debió ser ajeno a su promoción el hecho de que dos primos de su padre habían sido cónsules durante el reinado de Antonino Pío. Tras la muerte del emperador Pertinax, los pretorianos vendieron el trono del Imperio a Didio Juliano, un rico e influyente senador. Sin embargo, desde el inicio de su reinado Juliano tuvo que enfrentarse a una férrea oposición procedente del pueblo y del ejército.

Aprovechando la debilidad del nuevo emperador, algunos gobernadores de provincia, entre los que se encontraba el propio Severo, se rebelaron contra el orden establecido. Con el fin de adelantarse a sus rivales en la sucesión, el ex gobernador de Panonia marchó contra Roma y depuso a Juliano, quien murió ejecutado por órdenes del Senado.

Tras unos años de guerras civiles en los que tuvo que enfrentarse a Pescenio Níger en Siria y a Clodio Albino en Galia, Severo logró consolidar su poder y fundar una dinastía que continuarían sus hijos, Caracalla y Geta, y otros familiares; poco después de la muerte de su padre el hijo menor, Geta, fue asesinado por su hermano Caracalla.

Militarmente su reinado se caracterizó por la exitosa guerra que llevó a cabo contra el Imperio parto, consecuencia de la cual Mesopotamia volvió a caer bajo control romano. En esta campaña sus soldados saquearon la ciudad de Ctesifonte y vendieron a los supervivientes como esclavos. A su regreso a Roma, se erigió un arco del triunfo a fin de conmemorar esta victoria. En sus últimos años tuvo que defender las fronteras de los ataques de los bárbaros, que ponían en peligro la integridad territorial del Imperio. Especialmente duros fueron los levantamientos que tuvieron lugar en Britania, por lo que Severo mandó reforzar el Muro de Adriano.

Sus relaciones con el Senado nunca fueron buenas, pues se había hecho especialmente impopular entre los senadores al acotar su poder con apoyo del ejército. Ordenó ejecutar a docenas de senadores bajo acusaciones de corrupción y conspiración, y los reemplazó por hombres fieles a su causa. Disolvió la Guardia Pretoriana y sustituyéndola por su guardia personal a fin de asegurarse un total control político y su propia seguridad. Durante su reinado acamparon en las inmediaciones de la capital imperial unos 50 000 soldados. Aunque sus ansias de poder convirtieron a Roma en una dictadura militar, Septimio Severo fue muy popular entre la población debido a que restableció la moral tras los años decadentes del gobierno de Cómodo, y consiguió contener la corrupción que se había instalado en todos los órdenes.

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Frases Septimio Severo

„Let no one charge us with capricious inconsistency in our actions against Albinus, and let no one think that I am disloyal to this alleged friend or lacking in feeling toward him. 2. We gave this man everything, even a share of the established empire, a thing which a man would hardly do for his own brother. Indeed, I bestowed upon him that which you entrusted to me alone. Surely Albinus has shown little gratitude for the many benefits I have lavished upon him. 3. Now |87 he is collecting an army to take up arms against us, scornful of your valor and indifferent to his pledge of good faith to me, wishing in his insatiable greed to seize at the risk of disaster that which he has already received in part without war and without bloodshed, showing no respect for the gods by whom he has often sworn, and counting as worthless the labors you performed on our joint behalf with such courage and devotion to duty. 4. In what you accomplished, he also had a share, and he would have had an even greater share of the honor you gained for us both if he had only kept his word. For, just as it is unfair to initiate wrong actions, so also it is cowardly to make no defense against unjust treatment. Now when we took the field against Niger, we had reasons for our hostility, not entirely logical, perhaps, but inevitable. We did not hate him because he had seized the empire after it was already ours, but rather each one of us, motivated by an equal desire for glory, sought the empire for himself alone, when it was still in dispute and lay prostrate before all. 5. But Albinus has violated his pledges and broken his oaths, and although he received from me that which a man normally gives only to his son, he has chosen to be hostile rather than friendly and belligerent instead of peaceful. And just as we were generous to him previously and showered fame and honor upon him, so let us now punish him with our arms for his treachery and cowardice. 6. His army, small and island-bred, will not stand against your might. For you, who by your valor and readiness to act on your own behalf have been victorious in many battles and have gained control of the entire East, how can you fail to emerge victorious with the greatest of ease when you have so large a number of allies and when virtually the entire army is here. Whereas they, by contrast, are few in number and lack a brave and competent general to lead them. 7. Who does not know Albinus' effeminate nature? Who does not know that his way |88 of life has prepared him more for the chorus than for the battlefield? Let us therefore go forth against him with confidence, relying on our customary zeal and valor, with the gods as our allies, gods against whom he has acted impiously in breaking his oaths, and let us be mindful of the victories we have won, victories which that man ridicules.“

—  Septimius Severus
Herodian, Book 3, Chapter 6.

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„You see by what has happened that we are superior to you in intelligence, in size of army, and in number of supporters. Surely you were easily trapped, captured without a struggle. It is in my power to do with you what I wish when I wish. Helpless and prostrate, you lie before us now, victims of our might. But if one looks for a punishment equal to the crimes you have committed, it is impossible to find a suitable one. You murdered your revered and benevolent old emperor, the man whom it was your sworn duty to protect. The empire of the Roman people, eternally respected, which our forefathers obtained by their valiant courage or inherited because of their noble birth, this empire you shamefully and disgracefully sold for silver as if it were your personal property. But you were unable to defend the man whom you yourselves had chosen as emperor. No, you betrayed him like the cowards you are. For these monstrous acts and crimes you deserve a thousand deaths, if one wished to do to you what you have earned. You see clearly what it is right you should suffer. But I will be merciful. I will not butcher you. My hands shall not do what your hands did. But I say that it is in no way fit or proper for you to continue to serve as the emperor's bodyguard, you who have violated your oath and stained your hands with the blood of your emperor and fellow Roman, betraying the trust placed in you and the security offered by your protection. Still, compassion leads me to spare your lives and your persons. But I order the soldiers who have you surrounded to cashier you, to strip off any military uniform or equipment you are wearing, and drive you off naked. 9. And I order you to get yourselves as far from the city of Rome as is humanly possible, and I promise you and I swear it on solemn oath and I proclaim it publicly that if any one of you is found within a hundred miles of Rome, he shall pay for it with his head.“

—  Septimius Severus
Herodian, Book II.

„Be harmonious, enrich the soldiers, scorn everybody else.“

—  Septimius Severus
Statement made on his deathbed to his sons. Cassius Dio, Book 77, Part 16.

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