Frases Wallace Stevens

„Yet look not at his colored eyes. Give him
No names. Dismiss him from your images.
The hot of him is purest in the heart.“

—  Wallace Stevens

Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), It Must Be Abstract
Contexto: p>He is and may be but oh! He is, he is,
This foundling of the infected past, so bright,
So moving in the manner of his hand. Yet look not at his colored eyes. Give him
No names. Dismiss him from your images.
The hot of him is purest in the heart. </p

„Apotheosis is not
The origin of the major man.“

—  Wallace Stevens

Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), It Must Be Abstract
Contexto: p>Apotheosis is not
The origin of the major man. He comes,p>Compact in invincible foils, from reason,
Lighted at midnight by the studious eye,
Swaddled in revery, the object ofThe hum of thoughts evaded in the mind...</p

„Begin, ephebe, by perceiving the idea
Of this invention, this invented world,
The inconceivable idea of the sun.“

—  Wallace Stevens

Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), It Must Be Abstract
Contexto: p>Begin, ephebe, by perceiving the idea
Of this invention, this invented world,
The inconceivable idea of the sun.You must become an ignorant man again
And see the sun again with an ignorant eye
And see it clearly in the idea of it.Never suppose an inventing mind as source
Of this idea nor for that mind compose
A voluminous master folded in his fire.</p

„As a man and woman meet and love forthwith.
Perhaps there are moments of awakening,
Extreme, fortuitous, personal, in which“

—  Wallace Stevens

Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), It Must Be Abstract
Contexto: p>As a man and woman meet and love forthwith.
Perhaps there are moments of awakening,
Extreme, fortuitous, personal, in whichWe more than awaken, sit on the edge of sleep,
As on an elevation, and behold
The academies like structures in a mist.</p

„A vermillioned nothingness, any stick of the mass
Of which we are too distantly a part.“

—  Wallace Stevens

"Less and Less Human, O Savage Spirit"
Transport to Summer (1947)
Contexto: p> If there must be a god in the house, must be,
Saying things in the room and on the stair,Let him move as the sunlight moves on the floor,
Or moonlight, silently, as Plato's ghostOr Aristotle's skeleton. Let him hang out
His stars on the wall. He must dwell quietly.He must be incapable of speaking, closed,
As those are: as light, for all its motion, is;As color, even the closest to us, is;
As shapes, though they portend us, are.It is the human that is the alien,
The human that has no cousin in the moon.It is the human that demands his speech
From beasts or from the incommunicable mass.If there must be a god in the house, let him be one
That will not hear us when we speak: a coolnessA vermillioned nothingness, any stick of the mass
Of which we are too distantly a part.</p

„Violets, doves, girls, bees and hyacinths
Are inconstant objects of inconstant cause
In a universe of inconstancy.“

—  Wallace Stevens

Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), It Must Change
Contexto: The bees came booming as if they had never gone,
As if hyacinths had never gone. We say
This changes and that changes. Thus the constant Violets, doves, girls, bees and hyacinths
Are inconstant objects of inconstant cause
In a universe of inconstancy. This meansNight-blue is an inconstant thing. The seraph
Is satyr in Saturn, according to his thoughts.

„But to impose is not
To discover.“

—  Wallace Stevens

Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), It Must Give Pleasure
Contexto: p>But to impose is not
To discover. To discover an order as of
A season, to discover summer and know it, To discover winter and know it well, to find
Not to impose, not to have reasoned at all,
Out of nothing to have come on major weather,It is possible, possible, possible. It must
Be possible. It must be that in time
The real will from its crude compoundings come,Seeming at first, a beast disgorged, unlike,
Warmed by a desperate milk. To find the real,
To be stripped of every fiction except one,The fiction of an absolute — Angel,
Be silent in your luminous cloud and hear
The luminous melody of proper sound.

„The difficultest rigor is forthwith,
On the image of what we see, to catch from that
Irrational moment its unreasoning“

—  Wallace Stevens

Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), It Must Give Pleasure
Contexto: p>The difficultest rigor is forthwith,
On the image of what we see, to catch from that
Irrational moment its unreasoning,
As when the sun comes rising, when the sea
Clears deeply, when the moon hangs on the wall Of heaven-haven. These are not things transformed.
Yet we are shaken by them as if they were.
We reason about them with a later reason.</p

„Let him move as the sunlight moves on the floor,
Or moonlight, silently, as Plato's ghost“

—  Wallace Stevens

"Less and Less Human, O Savage Spirit"
Transport to Summer (1947)
Contexto: p> If there must be a god in the house, must be,
Saying things in the room and on the stair,Let him move as the sunlight moves on the floor,
Or moonlight, silently, as Plato's ghostOr Aristotle's skeleton. Let him hang out
His stars on the wall. He must dwell quietly.He must be incapable of speaking, closed,
As those are: as light, for all its motion, is;As color, even the closest to us, is;
As shapes, though they portend us, are.It is the human that is the alien,
The human that has no cousin in the moon.It is the human that demands his speech
From beasts or from the incommunicable mass.If there must be a god in the house, let him be one
That will not hear us when we speak: a coolnessA vermillioned nothingness, any stick of the mass
Of which we are too distantly a part.</p

„Between, but of. He chose to include the things
That in each other are included, the whole,
The complicate, the amassing harmony.“

—  Wallace Stevens

Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), It Must Give Pleasure
Contexto: p>Straight to the utmost crown of night he flew.
The nothingness was a nakedness, a pointBeyond which thought could not progress as thought.
He had to choose. But it was not a choice
Between excluding things. It was not a choiceBetween, but of. He chose to include the things
That in each other are included, the whole,
The complicate, the amassing harmony.</p

„Two things of opposite natures seem to depend
On one another, as a man depends
On a woman, day on night, the imagined“

—  Wallace Stevens

Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), It Must Change
Contexto: p>Two things of opposite natures seem to depend
On one another, as a man depends
On a woman, day on night, the imaginedOn the real. This is the origin of change.
Winter and spring, cold copulars, embrace
And forth the particulars of rapture come.</p

„The west wind was the music, the motion, the force
To which the swans curveted, a will to change,
A will to make iris frettings on the blank.“

—  Wallace Stevens

Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), It Must Change
Contexto: Like a page of music, like an upper air,
Like a momentary color, in which swans
Were seraphs, were saints, were changing essences. The west wind was the music, the motion, the force
To which the swans curveted, a will to change,
A will to make iris frettings on the blank.

„One must have a mind of winter
To regard the frost and the boughs
Of the pine-trees crusted with snow“

—  Wallace Stevens, libro Harmonium

"The Snow Man"
Harmonium (1923)
Contexto: p>One must have a mind of winter
To regard the frost and the boughs
Of the pine-trees crusted with snow;And have been cold a long time
To behold the junipers shagged with ice,
The spruces rough in the distant glitterOf the January sun; and not to think
Of any misery in the sound of the wind,
In the sound of a few leaves,Which is the sound of the land
Full of the same wind
That is blowing in the same bare placeFor the listener, who listens in the snow,
And, nothing himself, beholds
Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is.</p

„There’s a meditation there, in which there seems“

—  Wallace Stevens

Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), It Must Change
Contexto: p>Is there a poem that never reaches words And one that chaffers the time away?
Is the poem both peculiar and general?
There’s a meditation there, in which there seemsTo be an evasion, a thing not apprehended or
Not apprehended well. Does the poet
Evade us, as in a senseless element?</p

„Just as my fingers on these keys Make music, so the self-same sounds On my spirit make a music, too. Music is feeling, then, not sound“

—  Wallace Stevens

Peter Quince at the Clavier (1915)
Contexto: Just as my fingers on these keys Make music, so the self-same sounds On my spirit make a music, too. Music is feeling, then, not sound;
And thus it is that what I feel,
Here in this room, desiring you,
Thinking of your blue-shadowed silk,
Is music.

„An odor evoking nothing, absolute.“

—  Wallace Stevens

Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), It Must Change
Contexto: p>Tonight the lilacs magnify
The easy passion, the ever-ready love
Of the lover that lies within us and we breatheAn odor evoking nothing, absolute.
We encounter in the dead middle of the night
The purple odor, the abundant bloom.</p

„It is not in the premise that reality
Is a solid.“

—  Wallace Stevens, libro The Auroras of Autumn

"An Ordinary Evening in New Haven"
The Auroras of Autumn (1950)
Contexto: It is not in the premise that reality
Is a solid. It may be a shade that traverses
A dust, a force that traverses a shade.

„The major abstraction is the commonal,
The inanimate, difficult visage.“

—  Wallace Stevens

Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), It Must Be Abstract
Contexto: p>In being more than an exception, part,Though an heroic part, of the commonal.
The major abstraction is the commonal,
The inanimate, difficult visage.</p

„This may be a gross exaggeration of a very simple matter. But perhaps the same is true of many of the more prodigious things of life and death.“

—  Wallace Stevens

"The Figure of the Youth as Virile Poet"
The Necessary Angel (1951)
Contexto: It may be dismissed, on the one hand, as a commonplace aesthetic satisfaction: and, on the other hand, if we say that the idea of God is merely a poetic idea, even if the supreme poetic idea, and that our notions of heaven and hell are merely poetry not so called, even if poetry that involves us vitally, the feeling of deliverance, of a release, of a perfection touched, of a vocation so that all men may know the truth and that the truth may set them free — if we say these things and if we are able to see the poet who achieved God and placed Him in His seat in heaven in all His glory, the poet himself, still in the ecstasy of the poem that completely accomplished its purpose, would have seemed, whether young or old, whether in rags or ceremonial robe, a man who needed what he had created, uttering the hymns of joy that followed his creation. This may be a gross exaggeration of a very simple matter. But perhaps the same is true of many of the more prodigious things of life and death.

„It is the human that demands his speech
From beasts or from the incommunicable mass.“

—  Wallace Stevens

"Less and Less Human, O Savage Spirit"
Transport to Summer (1947)
Contexto: p> If there must be a god in the house, must be,
Saying things in the room and on the stair,Let him move as the sunlight moves on the floor,
Or moonlight, silently, as Plato's ghostOr Aristotle's skeleton. Let him hang out
His stars on the wall. He must dwell quietly.He must be incapable of speaking, closed,
As those are: as light, for all its motion, is;As color, even the closest to us, is;
As shapes, though they portend us, are.It is the human that is the alien,
The human that has no cousin in the moon.It is the human that demands his speech
From beasts or from the incommunicable mass.If there must be a god in the house, let him be one
That will not hear us when we speak: a coolnessA vermillioned nothingness, any stick of the mass
Of which we are too distantly a part.</p

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Autores similares

Robert Lee Frost Foto
Robert Lee Frost19
poeta estadounidense
Rainer Maria Rilke Foto
Rainer Maria Rilke46
poeta austríaco
Amado Nervo Foto
Amado Nervo40
poeta y prosista mexicano
Jaime Sabines Foto
Jaime Sabines47
poeta y político mexicano
Gibran Jalil Gibran Foto
Gibran Jalil Gibran48
poeta libanés
Ezra Pound Foto
Ezra Pound25
poeta, ensayista, músico y crítico estadounidense
Pablo Neruda Foto
Pablo Neruda198
poeta
Pier Paolo Pasolini Foto
Pier Paolo Pasolini6
escritor, poeta y director de cine italiano
William Faulkner Foto
William Faulkner124
narrador y poeta estadounidense
Vicente Aleixandre Foto
Vicente Aleixandre16
poeta español
Aniversarios de hoy
Elisabeth Kübler-Ross Foto
Elisabeth Kübler-Ross19
psiquiatra y tanatolaga experta en cuidados paliativos 1926 - 2004
Kutxi Romero Foto
Kutxi Romero30
escritor español 1975
Marianne Williamson Foto
Marianne Williamson83
escritora estadounidense 1952
Giovanni Papini Foto
Giovanni Papini119
escritor italiano 1881 - 1956
Otros 57 aniversarios hoy
Autores similares
Robert Lee Frost Foto
Robert Lee Frost19
poeta estadounidense
Rainer Maria Rilke Foto
Rainer Maria Rilke46
poeta austríaco
Amado Nervo Foto
Amado Nervo40
poeta y prosista mexicano
Jaime Sabines Foto
Jaime Sabines47
poeta y político mexicano
Gibran Jalil Gibran Foto
Gibran Jalil Gibran48
poeta libanés