Frases de Josef Pieper

Josef Pieper Foto
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Josef Pieper

Fecha de nacimiento: 4. Mayo 1904
Fecha de muerte: 6. Noviembre 1997

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Josef Pieper fue un filósofo neoescolástico alemán. Estudió Filosofía, Derecho y Sociología en las Universidades de Berlín y Münster. Inició su labor docente en 1946 en la Escuela Superior de Pedagogía de Essen. Desde 1950 fue profesor ordinario de Antropología Filosófica en la Universidad de Münster. Fue miembro de la Academia Alemana de Lengua y Poesía y del Centro de Estudios para la Investigación. Sus trabajos suelen ser breves, ágiles y enjundiosos; él ha confesado en alguna ocasión: «Yo al darle forma a mis ideas, me inspiré en una forma musical: la suite».[1]​ Se lo considera uno de los pensadores católicos más influyentes del siglo xx, autoritativo en la filosofía de santo Tomás de Aquino, y uno de los primeros filósofos modernos en explorar la idea de la esperanza en la vida humana.[2]​

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Frases Josef Pieper

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„All just order in the world is based on this, that man give man what is his due.“

— Josef Pieper
Justice http://books.google.com/books?id=XjYbAAAAIAAJ&q=%22All+just+order+in+the+world+is+based+on+this+that+man+give+man+what+is+his+due%22&pg=PA10#v=onepage (1955)

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„Now this structure of hope (among other things) is also what distinguishes philosophy from the special sciences. There is a relationship with the object that is different in principle in the two cases. The question of the special sciences is in principle ultimately answerable, or, at least, it is not un-answerable. It can be said, in a final way (or some day, one will be able to say in a final way) what is the cause, say, of this particular infectious disease. It is in principle possible that one day someone will say, "It is now scientifically proven that such and such is the case, and no otherwise." But […] a philosophical question can never be finally, conclusively answered. […] The object of philosophy is given to the philosopher on the basis of a hope. This is where Dilthey's words make sense: "The demands on the philosophizing person cannot be satisfied. A physicist is an agreeable entity, useful for himself and others; a philosopher, like the saint, only exists as an ideal." It is in the nature of the special sciences to emerge from a state of wonder to the extent that they reach "results." But the philosopher does not emerge from wonder.
Here is at once the limit and the measure of science, as well as the great value, and great doubtfulness, of philosophy. Certainly, in itself it is a "greater" thing to dwell "under the stars." But man is not made to live "out there" permanently! Certainly, it is a more valuable question, as such, to ask about the whole world and the ultimate nature of things. But the answer is not as easily forthcoming as for the special sciences!“

— Josef Pieper
pp. 109–111 The Dilthey quote is from Briefwechsel zwischen Wilhelm Dilthey und dem Grafen Paul Yorck v. Wartenberg, 1877–1897 (Hall/Salle, 1923), p. 39.

„And in this, that philosophy begins in wonder [Plato, Theaetetus 155d], lies the, so to speak, non-bourgeois character of philosophy; for to feel astonishment and wonder is something non-bourgeois (if we can be allowed, for a moment, to use this all-too-easy terminology). For what does it mean to become bourgeois in the intellectual sense? More than anything else, it means that someone takes one's immediate surroundings (the world determined by the immediate purposes of life) so "tightly" and "densely," as if bearing an ultimate value, that the things of experience no longer become transparent. The greater, deeper, more real, and (at first) invisible world of essences is no longer even suspected to exist; the "wonder" is no longer there, it has no place to come from; the human being can no longer feel wonder. The commonplace mind, rendered deaf-mute, finds everything self-explanatory. But what really is self-explanatory? Is it self-explanatory, then, that we exist? Is it self-explanatory that there is such a thing as "seeing"? These are questions that someone who is locked into the daily world cannot ask; and that is so because such a person has not succeeded, as anyone whose senses (like a deaf person) are simply not functioning — has not managed even for once to forget the immediate needs of life, whereas the one who experiences wonder is one who, astounded by the deeper aspect of the world, cannot hear the immediate demands of life — if even for a moment, that moment when he gazes on the astounding vision of the world.“

— Josef Pieper
pp. 101–102

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