Frases de Maimónides

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Maimónides

Fecha de nacimiento: 30. Marzo 1138
Fecha de muerte: 13. Diciembre 1204

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Maimónides , fue un médico, rabino y teólogo judío de al-Ándalus . Tuvo importancia como filósofo en el pensamiento medieval.

Obras

Mishné Torá
Maimónides
Sefer Hamitzvot
Maimónides

Frases Maimónides

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„[Ellos] fijaron para sí cuotas a individuos y comunidades e hicieron que la gente creyera, en absoluta insensatez, que era obligatorio y apropiado ayudar [económicamente] a los sabios y eruditos y a quienes estudiaban la Torá, de modo que la Torá es su negocio. Todo esto está mal. No hay ni una sola palabra, ya sea en la Torá o en los dichos de los sabios, que apoye esta creencia.“

—  Maimónides
Comentario sobre el Mishnah, Avot 4.5. Nota: Cuando los rabíes convirtieron su posición en una ocupación asalariada, hubo quienes alzaron su voz en protesta. A diferencia de estos rabinos, Maimónides trabajó arduamente como profesional de la medicina para mantenerse, y nunca aceptó remuneración económica por sus servicios religiosos.

„El madero en el cual alguien ha sido colgado debe ser enterrado, para que el nombre malo no permanezca con él y la gente diga: “Este es el madero en el cual fulano de tal fue colgado”.“

—  Maimónides
Nota: La cruz, en la que las religiones de la cristiandad alegan que fue ejecutado Cristo (aunque otras religiones afirman que fue en un madero), se considera el símbolo preeminente del cristianismo. Algunos religiosos hasta se inclinan ante ella y la besan. Entre los judíos, después de su restauración de Babilonia, el madero en el cual un hombre había sido ejecutado se consideraba detestable y símbolo de maldición, algo que habrían de enterrar para no verlo.

„Es mejor y más satisfactorio liberar a mil culpables que condenar a muerte a un solo inocente.“

—  Maimónides, libro Sefer Hamitzvot
Sefer Hamitzvot Fuente: El libro de los mandamientos. Source: Edición en inglés de Charles B. Chavel (1967); esta cita también aparece en el libro Defending the Human Spirit: Jewish Law's Vision for a Moral Society (2006), de Warren Goldstein, pág. 269.

„…one should accept the truth from whatever source it proceeds.“

—  Maimónides
Foreword to The Eight Chapters Of Maimonides On Ethics, translated by Joseph I. Gorfinkle, Ph.D. Columbia University Press, New York (1912). Page 35-36. https://archive.org/details/eightchaptersofm00maim Variant: "Accept the truth from whatever source it comes." Introduction to the Shemonah Peraqim, as quoted in Truth and Compassion: Essays on Judaism and Religion in Memory of Rabbi Dr. Solomon Frank (1983) Edited by Howard Joseph, Jack Nathan Lightstone, and Michael D. Oppenheim, p. 168 Variant: You must accept the truth from whatever source it comes.

„I have composed this work neither for the common people, nor for beginners, nor for those who occupy themselves only with the Law as it is handed down without concerning themselves with its principles. The design of this work is rather to promote the true understanding of the real spirit of the Law“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed
Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Introduction, Context: I have composed this work neither for the common people, nor for beginners, nor for those who occupy themselves only with the Law as it is handed down without concerning themselves with its principles. The design of this work is rather to promote the true understanding of the real spirit of the Law, to guide those religious persons who, adhering to the Torah, have studied philosophy and are embarrassed by the contradictions between the teachings of philosophy and the literal sense of the Torah. As quoted in The Jewish Encyclopedia (12 vols. 1901-1906) http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=905&letter=M

„What prevented Him from making His primary object a direct commandment to us, and to give us the capacity of obeying it?“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed
Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Context: What prevented Him from making His primary object a direct commandment to us, and to give us the capacity of obeying it?... As it is the chief object and purpose of God that we should believe in the Law, and act according to that which is written therein, why has He not given us the capacity of continually believing in it, and following its guidance, instead of holding out to us reward for obedience, and punishment for disobedience, or of actually giving all the predicted reward and punishment? For [the promises and the threats] are but the means of leading to this chief object. What prevented Him from giving us, as part of our nature, the will to do that which He desires us to do, and to abandon the kind of worship which He rejects? There is one general answer to these three questions, and all questions of the character; it is this: Although in every one of the signs [related in Scripture] the natural property of some individual being is changed, the nature of man is never changed by God by way of miracle.... it is in His power, according to the principles taught in Scripture, but it has never been His will to do it, and it never will be. If it were part of His will to change [at His desire] the nature of any person, the mission of prophets and the giving of the Law would have been altogether superfluous. Ch.32

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„Do not imagine that these most difficult problems can be thoroughly understood by any one of us. This is not the case.“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed
Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Introduction, Context: Do not imagine that these most difficult problems can be thoroughly understood by any one of us. This is not the case. At times the truth shines so brilliantly that we perceive it as clear as day. Our nature and habit then draw a veil over our perception, and we return to a darkness almost as dense as before. We are like those who, though beholding frequent flashes of lightning, still find themselves in the thickest darkness of the night. On some the lightning flashes in rapid succession, and they seem to be in continuous light, and their night is as clear as the day. This was the degree of prophetic excellence attained by (Moses) the greatest of prophets, to whom God said," But as for thee, stand thou here by Me" (Deut. v. 31), and of whom it is written" the skin of his face shone," etc. (Exod. xxxiv. 29). [Some perceive the prophetic flash at long intervals; this is the degree of most prophets. ] By others only once during the whole night is a flash of lightning perceived. This is the case with those of whom we are informed," They prophesied, and did not prophesy again" (Num. xi. 25). There are some to whom the flashes of lightning appear with varying intervals; others are in the condition of men, whose darkness is illumined not by lightning, but by some kind of crystal or similar stone, or other substances that possess the property of shining during the night; and to them even this small amount of light is not continuous, but now it shines and now it vanishes, as if it were" the flame of the rotating sword."

„The custom which was in those days“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed
Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Context: The custom which was in those days general among all men, and the general mode of worship in which the Israelites were brought up, consisted in sacrificing animals in those temples which contained certain images to bow down to those images, and to burn incense before them; religious and ascetic persons were in those days the persons that were devoted to the service in the temples erected to the stars... It was in accordance with the wisdom and plan of God, as displayed in the whole Creation, that He did not command us to give up and to discontinue all these manners of service, for to obey such a commandment it would have been contrary to the nature of man, who generally cleaves to that to which he is used... By this Divine plan it was effected that the traces of idolatry were blotted out, and the truly great principle of our faith, the existence and Unity of God, was firmly established; this result was thus obtained without deterring or confusing the minds of the people by the abolition of the service to which they were accustomed and which alone was familiar to them. Ch.32

„Those who wash their body and cleanse their garments whilst they remain dirty by bad actions and principles, are described by Solomon as "a generation that are pure in their own eyes, and yet are not washed from their filthiness; a generation, oh how lofty are their eyes!"“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed
Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Context: Those who wash their body and cleanse their garments whilst they remain dirty by bad actions and principles, are described by Solomon as "a generation that are pure in their own eyes, and yet are not washed from their filthiness; a generation, oh how lofty are their eyes!" &c. (Prov. xxx. 12-13). Consider well the principles which we mentioned... as the final causes of the Law; for there are many precepts, for which you will be unable to give a reason unless you possess a knowledge of these principles... Ch.33

„My object in adopting this arrangement is that the truths should be at one time apparent and at another time concealed.“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed
Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Introduction, Context: My object in adopting this arrangement is that the truths should be at one time apparent and at another time concealed. Thus we shall not be in opposition to the Divine Will (from which it is wrong to deviate) which has withheld from the multitude the truths required for the knowledge of God, according to the words, "The secret of the Lord is with them that fear Him." (Psalm 25:14)

„It is of great advantage that man should know his station, and not imagine that the whole universe exists only for him.“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed
Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Context: It is of great advantage that man should know his station, and not imagine that the whole universe exists only for him. We hold that the universe exists because the Creator wills it so; that mankind is low in rank as compared with the uppermost portion of the universe, viz., with the spheres and the stars; but, as regards the angels, there cannot be any real comparison between man and angels, although man is the highest of all beings on earth; i. e., of all the beings formed of the four elements. Ch.12

„This lesson is the principal object of the whole Book of Job“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed
Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Context: As there is a difference between works of nature and productions of human handicraft, so there is a difference between God's rule, providence, and intention in reference to all natural forces, and our rule, providence, and intention in reference to things which are the objects of our rule, providence, and intention. This lesson is the principal object of the whole Book of Job; it lays down this principle of faith, and recommends us to derive a proof from nature, that we should not fall into the error of imagining His knowledge to be similar to ours, or His intention, providence, and rule similar to ours. When we know this, we shall find everything that may befall us easy to bear; mishap will create no doubts in our hearts concerning God, whether He knows our affairs or not, whether He provides for us or abandons us. On the contrary, our fate will increase our love of God; as is said in the end of this prophecy: "Therefore I abhor myself and repent concerning the dust and ashes" (xlii. 6); and as our Sages say: "The pious do everything out of love, and rejoice in their own afflictions." If you pay to my words the attention which this treatise demands, and examine all that is said in the Book of Job, all will be clear to you, and you will find that I have grasped and taken hold of the whole subject; nothing has been left unnoticed, except such portions as are only introduced because of the context and the whole plan of the allegory. I have explained this method several times in the course of this treatise. Ch.23

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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