Frases de Maimónides

Maimónides Foto
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Maimónides

Fecha de nacimiento: 30. Marzo 1138
Fecha de muerte: 13. Diciembre 1204

Maimónides , fue un médico, rabino y teólogo judío de al-Ándalus . Tuvo importancia como filósofo en el pensamiento medieval.

Obras

Mishné Torá
Maimónides
Sefer Hamitzvot
Maimónides

„[Ellos] fijaron para sí cuotas a individuos y comunidades e hicieron que la gente creyera, en absoluta insensatez, que era obligatorio y apropiado ayudar [económicamente] a los sabios y eruditos y a quienes estudiaban la Torá, de modo que la Torá es su negocio. Todo esto está mal. No hay ni una sola palabra, ya sea en la Torá o en los dichos de los sabios, que apoye esta creencia.“

—  Maimónides

Comentario sobre el Mishnah, Avot 4.5.
Cuando los rabíes convirtieron su posición en una ocupación asalariada, hubo quienes alzaron su voz en protesta. A diferencia de estos rabinos, Maimónides trabajó arduamente como profesional de la medicina para mantenerse, y nunca aceptó remuneración económica por sus servicios religiosos.

„El madero en el cual alguien ha sido colgado debe ser enterrado, para que el nombre malo no permanezca con él y la gente diga: “Este es el madero en el cual fulano de tal fue colgado”.“

—  Maimónides

La cruz, en la que las religiones de la cristiandad alegan que fue ejecutado Cristo (aunque otras religiones afirman que fue en un madero), se considera el símbolo preeminente del cristianismo. Algunos religiosos hasta se inclinan ante ella y la besan. Entre los judíos, después de su restauración de Babilonia, el madero en el cual un hombre había sido ejecutado se consideraba detestable y símbolo de maldición, algo que habrían de enterrar para no verlo.

„Es mejor y más satisfactorio liberar a mil culpables que condenar a muerte a un solo inocente.“

—  Maimónides, libro Sefer Hamitzvot

Sefer Hamitzvot
Fuente: El libro de los mandamientos.
Fuente: Edición en inglés de Charles B. Chavel (1967); esta cita también aparece en el libro Defending the Human Spirit: Jewish Law's Vision for a Moral Society (2006), de Warren Goldstein, pág. 269.

„Know that this Universe, in its entirety, is nothing else but one individual being“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed

Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part I
Contexto: Know that this Universe, in its entirety, is nothing else but one individual being; that is to say, the outermost heavenly sphere, together with all included therein, is as regards individuality beyond all question a single being like Said and Omar. The variety of its substances—I mean the substances of that sphere and all its component parts—is like the variety of the substances of a human being: just as, e. g., Said is one individual, consisting of various solid substances, such as flesh, bones, sinews of various humours, and of various spiritual elements; in like manner this sphere in its totality is composed of the celestial orbs, the four elements and their combinations; there is no vacuum whatever therein, but the whole space is filled up with matter. Its centre is occupied by the earth, earth is surrounded by water, air encompasses the water, fire envelopes the air, and this again is enveloped by the fifth substance (quintessence). These substances form numerous spheres, one being enclosed within another so that no intermediate empty space, no vacuum, is left. One sphere surrounds and closely joins the other. All the spheres revolve with constant uniformity, without acceleration or retardation; that is to say, each sphere retains its individual nature as regards its velocity and the peculiarity of its motion; it does not move at one time quicker, at another slower. Compared with each other, however, some of the spheres move with less, others with greater velocity. The outermost, all-encompassing sphere, revolves with the greatest speed; it completes its revolution in one day, and causes every thing to participate in its motion, just as every particle of a thing moves when the entire body is in motion; for all existing beings stand in the same relation to that sphere as a part of a thing stands to the whole. These spheres have not a common centre; the centres of some of them are identical with the centre of the Universe, while those of the rest are different from it. Some of the spheres have a motion independent of that of the whole Universe, constantly revolving from East to West, while other spheres move from West to East. The stars contained in those spheres are part of their respective orbits; they are fixed in them, and have no motion of their own, but participating in the motion of the sphere of which they are a part, they themselves appear to move. The entire substance of this revolving fifth element is unlike the substance of those bodies which consist of the other four elements, and are enclosed by the fifth element.<!--pp.288-292 (1881) Tr. Friedlander

„…one should accept the truth from whatever source it proceeds.“

—  Maimónides

Foreword to The Eight Chapters Of Maimonides On Ethics, translated by Joseph I. Gorfinkle, Ph.D. Columbia University Press, New York (1912). Page 35-36. https://archive.org/details/eightchaptersofm00maim
Variante: "Accept the truth from whatever source it comes." Introduction to the Shemonah Peraqim, as quoted in Truth and Compassion: Essays on Judaism and Religion in Memory of Rabbi Dr. Solomon Frank (1983) Edited by Howard Joseph, Jack Nathan Lightstone, and Michael D. Oppenheim, p. 168
Variante: You must accept the truth from whatever source it comes.

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„I agree with Aristotle as regards all other living beings“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed

Fuente: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.17
Contexto: I agree with Aristotle as regards all other living beings and à fortiori as regards plants and all the rest of earthly creatures. For I do not believe that it is through Divine Providence that a certain leaf drops, nor do I hold that when a certain spider catches a certain fly, that this is a direct result of a special decree and will of God in that moment; it is not by a particular Divine decree that the spittle of a certain person moved, fell on a certain gnat in a certain place, and killed it; nor is it by the direct will of God that a certain fish catches and swallows a certain worm on the surface of the water. In all these cases the action is... entirely due to chance, as taught by Aristotle.

„Thus all precepts cautioning against idolatry, or against that which is connected therewith, leads to it, or is related to it, are evidently useful.“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed

Fuente: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.29
Contexto: You know from the repeated declarations in the Law that the principal purpose of the whole Law was the removal and utter destruction of idolatry, and all that is connected therewith, even its name, and everything that might lead to any such practices, e. g., acting as a consulter with familiar spirits, or as a wizard, passing children through the fire, divining, observing the clouds, enchanting, charming, or inquiring of the dead. The law prohibits us to imitate the heathen in any of these deeds, and a fortiori to adopt them entirely. It is distinctly said in the Law that everything which idolaters consider as service to their gods, and a means of approaching them, is rejected and despised by God... Thus all precepts cautioning against idolatry, or against that which is connected therewith, leads to it, or is related to it, are evidently useful.

„The second class of evils comprises such evils as people cause to each other, when, e.g., some of them use their strength against others.“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed

Fuente: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.12
Contexto: The second class of evils comprises such evils as people cause to each other, when, e. g., some of them use their strength against others. These evils are more numerous than those of the first kind... they likewise originate in ourselves, though the sufferer himself cannot avert them.

„These sublime and profound themes admit of no proof whatever… In all questions that cannot be demonstrated, we must adopt the method which we have adopted in this question about God's Omniscience. Note it.“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed

Fuente: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.21
Contexto: He fully knows His unchangeable essence, and has thus a knowledge of all that results from any of His acts. If we were to try to understand in what manner this is done, it would be the same as if we tried to be the same as God, and to make our knowledge identical with His knowledge. Those who seek the truth, and admit what is true, must believe that nothing is hidden from God; that everything is revealed to His knowledge, which is identical with His essence; that this kind of knowledge cannot be comprehended by us; for if we knew its method, we would possess that intellect by which such knowledge could be acquired.... Note this well, for I think that this is an excellent idea, and leads to correct views; no error will be found in it; no dialectical argument; it does not lead to any absurd conclusion, nor to ascribing any defect to God. These sublime and profound themes admit of no proof whatever... In all questions that cannot be demonstrated, we must adopt the method which we have adopted in this question about God's Omniscience. Note it.

„All species of irrational animals likewise move by their own free will. This is the Will of God; that“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed

Fuente: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.17
Contexto: Fifth Theory.—This is our theory, or that of our Law.... The theory of man's perfectly free will is one of the fundamental principles of the Law of our teacher Moses, and of those who follow the Law. According to this principle man does what is in his power to do, by his nature, his choice, and his will; and his action is not due to any faculty created for the purpose. All species of irrational animals likewise move by their own free will. This is the Will of God; that is to say, it is due to the eternal divine will that all living beings should move freely, and that man should have the power to act according to his will or choice within the limits of his capacity.

„When a man reflects on these things, studies all these created beings, from the angels and spheres down to human beings and so on, and realizes the divine wisdom manifested in them all, his love for God will increase, his soul will thirst, his very flesh will yearn to love God.“

—  Maimónides, libro Mishné Torá

Book 1 (Sefer HaMadda'<!--[sic]-->), 4.12
Mishneh Torah (c. 1180)
Contexto: When a man reflects on these things, studies all these created beings, from the angels and spheres down to human beings and so on, and realizes the divine wisdom manifested in them all, his love for God will increase, his soul will thirst, his very flesh will yearn to love God. He will be filled with fear and trembling, as he becomes conscious of his lowly condition, poverty, and insignificance, and compares himself with any of the great and holy bodies; still more when he compares himself with any one of the pure forms that are incorporeal and have never had association with any corporeal substance. He will then realize that he is a vessel full of shame, dishonor, and reproach, empty and deficient.

„The strange and wonderful Book of Job treats of the same subject as we are discussing; its contents are a fiction, conceived for the purpose of explaining the different opinions which people hold on Divine Providence. …This fiction, however, is in so far different from other fictions that it includes profound ideas and great mysteries, removes great doubts, and reveals the most important truths.“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed

Fuente: Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Part III, Ch.22
Contexto: The strange and wonderful Book of Job treats of the same subject as we are discussing; its contents are a fiction, conceived for the purpose of explaining the different opinions which people hold on Divine Providence.... This fiction, however, is in so far different from other fictions that it includes profound ideas and great mysteries, removes great doubts, and reveals the most important truths. I will discuss it as fully as possible; and I will also tell you the words of our Sages that suggested to me the explanation of this great poem.

„The same difficulties which he encountered when investigating the subject for himself will attend him when endeavouring to instruct others“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed

Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Introduction
Contexto: You must know that if a person, who has attained a certain degree of perfection, wishes to impart to others, either orally or in writing, any portion of the knowledge which he has acquired of these subjects, he is utterly unable to be as systematic and explicit as he could be in a science of which the method is well known. The same difficulties which he encountered when investigating the subject for himself will attend him when endeavouring to instruct others: viz., at one time the explanation will appear lucid, at another time, obscure: this property of the subject appears to remain the same both to the advanced scholar and to the beginner. For this reason, great theological scholars gave instruction in all such matters only by means of metaphors and allegories.

„This book will then be a key admitting to places the gates of which would otherwise be closed. When the gates are opened and men enter, their souls will enjoy repose, their eyes will be gratified, and even their bodies, after all toil and labour, will be refreshed.“

—  Maimónides, libro The Guide for the Perplexed

Guide for the Perplexed (c. 1190), Introduction
Contexto: Having concluded these introductory remarks I proceed to examine those expressions, to the true meaning of which, as apparent from the context, it is necessary to direct your attention. This book will then be a key admitting to places the gates of which would otherwise be closed. When the gates are opened and men enter, their souls will enjoy repose, their eyes will be gratified, and even their bodies, after all toil and labour, will be refreshed.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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