Frases de Maurice Maeterlinck

Maurice Maeterlinck Foto
16   1

Maurice Maeterlinck

Fecha de nacimiento: 29. Agosto 1862
Fecha de muerte: 6. Mayo 1949

Maurice Maeterlinck fue un dramaturgo y ensayista belga de lengua francesa, principal exponente del teatro simbolista.

Estudió leyes en la Universidad de Gante . En 1885 publicó sus primeros poemas de inspiración parnasiana en la revista literaria y artística Jeune Belgique . En 1886 abandonó su profesión y se trasladó a París, donde entabló relación con los escritores que más van a influir en él: Stéphane Mallarmé y Villiers De L'Isle-Adam. Este último le hizo conocer toda la profundidad del idealismo alemán . En esa misma época, estudió a Ruysbroeck el Admirable, un místico flamenco del siglo XIV del que tradujo en 1891 "Ornement des noces spirituelles", que le llevó a descubrir las riquezas intuitivas del mundo germánico muy alejadas del racionalismo predominante en la literatura francesa. Con este espíritu, y notablemente influido por Novalis entró en contacto con el romanticismo de Jena , en torno a August y Friedrich Schlegel y de la revista Athenaeum, precursor, en línea directa, del simbolismo. En sus obras publicadas entre 1889 y 1896, se refleja esta influencia germánica.

En 1890 se volvió muy famoso gracias al escritor Octave Mirbeau. En 1902 escribió "Monna Vanna", obra teatral que interpretará Georgette Leblanc, actriz a la que conoció en 1895 y que será su compañera hasta 1919, año en el que contrae matrimonio con la joven Renée Dahon.

En 1921 impartió clases en Estados Unidos y, en este país, pasó la II Guerra Mundial. Durante una corta estancia en Portugal, en 1937, escribió el prefacio del discurso político de Salazar: Une revolution dans la paix.

Tuvo una cierta influencia, a través de su teatro poético, sobre algunos autores españoles como Federico García Lorca en sus obras teatrales tempranas.

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Start translating

„I know that you are looking for the Blue Bird, that is to say, the great secret of things and of happiness, so that Man may make our servitude still harder.“

—  Maurice Maeterlinck, The Blue Bird

The Oak
The Blue Bird (1908)
Contexto: I know that you are looking for the Blue Bird, that is to say, the great secret of things and of happiness, so that Man may make our servitude still harder. … I do not hear the Animals... Where are they?... All this concerns them as much as us... We, the Trees, must not assume the responsibility alone for the grave measures that have become necessary... On the day when Man hears that we have done what we are about to do, there will be terrible reprisals... It is right, therefore, that our agreement should be unanimous, so that our silence may be the same...

„We believe that we see nothing hanging over us but catastrophes, deaths, torments and disasters; we shiver at the mere thought of the great interplanetary spaces, with their cold and formidable and gloomy solitudes; and we imagine that the revolving worlds are as unhappy as ourselves because they freeze, or clash together, or are consumed in unutterable flames.“

—  Maurice Maeterlinck

Death (1912)
Contexto: It is childish to talk of happiness and unhappiness where infinity is in question. The idea which we entertain of happiness and unhappiness is something so special, so human, so fragile that it does not exceed our stature and falls to dust as soon as we go beyond its little sphere. It proceeds entirely from a few accidents of our nerves, which are made to appreciate very slight happenings, but which could as easily have felt everything the reverse way and taken pleasure in that which is now pain. We believe that we see nothing hanging over us but catastrophes, deaths, torments and disasters; we shiver at the mere thought of the great interplanetary spaces, with their cold and formidable and gloomy solitudes; and we imagine that the revolving worlds are as unhappy as ourselves because they freeze, or clash together, or are consumed in unutterable flames. We infer from this that the genius of the universe is an outrageous tyrant, seized with a monstrous madness, and that it delights only in the torture of itself and all that it contains. To millions of stars, each many thousand times larger than our sun, to nebulee whose nature and dimensions no figure, no word in our languages is able to express, we attribute our momentary sensibility, the little ephemeral and chance working of our nerves; and we are convinced that life there must be impossible or appalling, because we should feel too hot or too cold. It were much wiser to say to ourselves that it would need but a trifle, a few papilla more or less to our skin, the slightest modification of our eyes and ears, to turn the temperature, the silence and the darkness of space into a delicious spring-time, an unequalled music, a divine light. It were much more reasonable to persuade ourselves that the catastrophes which we think that we behold are life itself, the joy and one or other of those immense festivals of mind and matter in which death, thrusting aside at last our two enemies, time and space, will soon permit us to take part. Each world dissolving, extinguished, crumbling, burnt or colliding with another world and pulverized means the commencement of a magnificent experiment, the dawn of a marvelous hope and perhaps an unexpected happiness drawn direct from the inexhaustible unknown. What though they freeze or flame, collect or disperse, pursue or flee one another: mind and matter, no longer united by the same pitiful hazard that joined them in us, must rejoice at all that happens; for all is but birth and re-birth, a departure into an unknown filled with wonderful promises and maybe an anticipation of some unutterable event …
And, should they stand still one day, become fixed and remain motionless, it will not be that they have encountered calamity, nullity or death; but they will have entered into a thing so fair, so great, so happy and bathed in such certainties that they will for ever prefer it to all the prodigious chances of an infinity which nothing can impoverish.

„He's not quite blue yet, but that will come, you shall see!“

—  Maurice Maeterlinck, The Blue Bird

Tyltyl
The Blue Bird (1908)
Contexto: He's not quite blue yet, but that will come, you shall see! … Take him off quick to your little girl...

„It were much more reasonable to persuade ourselves that the catastrophes which we think that we behold are life itself, the joy and one or other of those immense festivals of mind and matter in which death, thrusting aside at last our two enemies, time and space, will soon permit us to take part. Each world dissolving, extinguished, crumbling, burnt or colliding with another world and pulverized means the commencement of a magnificent experiment, the dawn of a marvelous hope and perhaps an unexpected happiness drawn direct from the inexhaustible unknown. What though they freeze or flame, collect or disperse, pursue or flee one another: mind and matter, no longer united by the same pitiful hazard that joined them in us, must rejoice at all that happens; for all is but birth and re-birth, a departure into an unknown filled with wonderful promises and maybe an anticipation of some unutterable event …
And, should they stand still one day, become fixed and remain motionless, it will not be that they have encountered calamity, nullity or death; but they will have entered into a thing so fair, so great, so happy and bathed in such certainties that they will for ever prefer it to all the prodigious chances of an infinity which nothing can impoverish.“

—  Maurice Maeterlinck

Death (1912)
Contexto: It is childish to talk of happiness and unhappiness where infinity is in question. The idea which we entertain of happiness and unhappiness is something so special, so human, so fragile that it does not exceed our stature and falls to dust as soon as we go beyond its little sphere. It proceeds entirely from a few accidents of our nerves, which are made to appreciate very slight happenings, but which could as easily have felt everything the reverse way and taken pleasure in that which is now pain. We believe that we see nothing hanging over us but catastrophes, deaths, torments and disasters; we shiver at the mere thought of the great interplanetary spaces, with their cold and formidable and gloomy solitudes; and we imagine that the revolving worlds are as unhappy as ourselves because they freeze, or clash together, or are consumed in unutterable flames. We infer from this that the genius of the universe is an outrageous tyrant, seized with a monstrous madness, and that it delights only in the torture of itself and all that it contains. To millions of stars, each many thousand times larger than our sun, to nebulee whose nature and dimensions no figure, no word in our languages is able to express, we attribute our momentary sensibility, the little ephemeral and chance working of our nerves; and we are convinced that life there must be impossible or appalling, because we should feel too hot or too cold. It were much wiser to say to ourselves that it would need but a trifle, a few papilla more or less to our skin, the slightest modification of our eyes and ears, to turn the temperature, the silence and the darkness of space into a delicious spring-time, an unequalled music, a divine light. It were much more reasonable to persuade ourselves that the catastrophes which we think that we behold are life itself, the joy and one or other of those immense festivals of mind and matter in which death, thrusting aside at last our two enemies, time and space, will soon permit us to take part. Each world dissolving, extinguished, crumbling, burnt or colliding with another world and pulverized means the commencement of a magnificent experiment, the dawn of a marvelous hope and perhaps an unexpected happiness drawn direct from the inexhaustible unknown. What though they freeze or flame, collect or disperse, pursue or flee one another: mind and matter, no longer united by the same pitiful hazard that joined them in us, must rejoice at all that happens; for all is but birth and re-birth, a departure into an unknown filled with wonderful promises and maybe an anticipation of some unutterable event …
And, should they stand still one day, become fixed and remain motionless, it will not be that they have encountered calamity, nullity or death; but they will have entered into a thing so fair, so great, so happy and bathed in such certainties that they will for ever prefer it to all the prodigious chances of an infinity which nothing can impoverish.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

Autores similares

W.B. Yeats Foto
W.B. Yeats1
poeta y dramaturgo irlandés
Elfriede Jelinek Foto
Elfriede Jelinek16
escritora austríaca
Octavio Paz Foto
Octavio Paz161
poeta, escritor, ensayista y diplomático mexicano
José Saramago Foto
José Saramago115
escritor, novelista, poeta, periodista y dramaturgo portu...
Wisława Szymborska Foto
Wisława Szymborska24
escritora polaca
Eugene O'Neill Foto
Eugene O'Neill8
dramaturgo estadounidense (1888-1953)
André Breton Foto
André Breton33
escritor, poeta y ensayista francés
Bertolt Brecht Foto
Bertolt Brecht45
biografía, dramaturgo y poeta alemán, creador del llamado...
Thomas Stearns Eliot Foto
Thomas Stearns Eliot13
poeta, dramaturgo y crítico literario anglo-estadounidense
Aniversarios de hoy
Arturo Pérez-Reverte Foto
Arturo Pérez-Reverte369
escritor y periodista español 1951
Fidel Castro Foto
Fidel Castro122
Ex Presidente de Cuba y Ex Primer Secretario del Partido ... 1926 - 2016
Sabino Arana Foto
Sabino Arana64
político español fundador del Partido Nacionalista Vasco 1865 - 1903
Andrew Carnegie Foto
Andrew Carnegie9
empresario y filántropo estadounidense 1835 - 1919
Otros 52 aniversarios hoy
Autores similares
W.B. Yeats Foto
W.B. Yeats1
poeta y dramaturgo irlandés
Elfriede Jelinek Foto
Elfriede Jelinek16
escritora austríaca
Octavio Paz Foto
Octavio Paz161
poeta, escritor, ensayista y diplomático mexicano
José Saramago Foto
José Saramago115
escritor, novelista, poeta, periodista y dramaturgo portu...
Wisława Szymborska Foto
Wisława Szymborska24
escritora polaca