Frases de W.B. Yeats

W.B. Yeats Foto
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W.B. Yeats

Fecha de nacimiento: 13. Junio 1865
Fecha de muerte: 28. Enero 1939

William Butler Yeats /jeɪts/ fue un poeta y dramaturgo irlandés. Envuelto en un halo de misticismo, fue una de las figuras más representativas del renacimiento literario irlandés y uno de los fundadores del Abbey Theatre. También ejerció como senador. Fue galardonado con el Premio Nobel de Literatura en 1923. Wikipedia

Frases W.B. Yeats

„The unavailing outcries and the old bitterness
That empty the heart.“

—  W.B. Yeats

In The Seven Woods http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1518/
In The Seven Woods (1904)
Contexto: I have heard the pigeons of the Seven Woods
Make their faint thunder, and the garden bees
Hum in the lime-tree flowers; and put away
The unavailing outcries and the old bitterness
That empty the heart. I have forgot awhile
Tara uprooted, and new commonness
Upon the throne and crying about the streets
And hanging its paper flowers from post to post,
Because it is alone of all things happy.
I am contented, for I know that Quiet
Wanders laughing and eating her wild heart
Among pigeons and bees, while that Great Archer,
Who but awaits His house to shoot, still hands
A cloudy quiver over Pairc-na-lee.

„But I, being poor, have only my dreams;
I have spread my dreams beneath your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.“

—  W.B. Yeats

He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1499/
Variante: I have spread my dreams under your feet.
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
Fuente: The Wind Among the Reeds (1899)
Contexto: Had I the heavens' embroidered cloths,
Enwrought with the golden and silver light,
The blue and the dim and the dark cloths
Of night and light and half-light,
I would spread the cloths under your feet:
But I, being poor, have only my dreams;
I have spread my dreams beneath your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.

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„And who could play it well enough
If deaf and dumb and blind with love?
He that made this knows all the cost,
For he gave all his heart and lost.“

—  W.B. Yeats

Never Give All The Heart http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1545/
In The Seven Woods (1904)
Contexto: Never give all the heart, for love
Will hardly seem worth thinking of
To passionate women if it seem
Certain, and they never dream
That it fades out from kiss to kiss;
For everything that's lovely is
but a brief, dreamy, kind of delight.
O never give the heart outright,
For they, for all smooth lips can say,
Have given their hearts up to the play.
And who could play it well enough
If deaf and dumb and blind with love?
He that made this knows all the cost,
For he gave all his heart and lost.

„She bid me take love easy, as the leaves grow on the tree;
But I, being young and foolish, with her would not agree.“

—  W.B. Yeats

Down By The Salley Gardens http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1476/
Crossways (1889)
Contexto: p>Down by the salley gardens my love and I did meet;
She passed the salley gardens with little snow-white feet.
She bid me take love easy, as the leaves grow on the tree;
But I, being young and foolish, with her would not agree.In a field by the river my love and I did stand,
And on my leaning shoulder she laid her snow-white hand.
She bid me take life easy, as the grass grows on the weirs;
But I was young and foolish, and now am full of tears.</p

„Till the wilderness cried aloud,
A secret between you two,
Between the proud and the proud.“

—  W.B. Yeats

Against Unworthy Praise http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1433/
The Green Helmet and Other Poems (1910)
Contexto: p>O heart, be at peace, because
Nor knave nor dolt can break
What's not for their applause
Being for a woman's sake.
Enough if the work has seemed,
So did she your strength renew,
A dream that a lion had dreamed
Till the wilderness cried aloud,
A secret between you two,
Between the proud and the proud.What, still you would have their praise!
But here's a haughtier text,
The labyrinth of her days
That her own strangeness perplexed;
And how what her dreaming gave
Earned slander, ingratitude,
From self-same dolt and knave;
Aye, and worse wrong than these.
Yet she, singing upon her road,
Half lion, half child, is at peace.</p

„She bid me take life easy, as the grass grows on the weirs;
But I was young and foolish, and now am full of tears.“

—  W.B. Yeats

Down By The Salley Gardens http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1476/
Crossways (1889)
Contexto: p>Down by the salley gardens my love and I did meet;
She passed the salley gardens with little snow-white feet.
She bid me take love easy, as the leaves grow on the tree;
But I, being young and foolish, with her would not agree.In a field by the river my love and I did stand,
And on my leaning shoulder she laid her snow-white hand.
She bid me take life easy, as the grass grows on the weirs;
But I was young and foolish, and now am full of tears.</p

„Once out of nature I shall never take
My bodily form from any natural thing,
But such a form as Grecian goldsmiths make“

—  W.B. Yeats, libro The Tower

St. 4
The Tower (1928), Sailing to Byzantium http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1575/
Contexto: Once out of nature I shall never take
My bodily form from any natural thing,
But such a form as Grecian goldsmiths make
Of hammered gold and gold enamelling
To keep a drowsy Emperor awake;
Or set upon a golden bough to sing
To lords and ladies of Byzantium
Of what is past, or passing, or to come.

„When they have but looked upon their images--
Would none had ever loved but you and I!“

—  W.B. Yeats

The Ragged Wood http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1673/
In The Seven Woods (1904)
Contexto: p>O hurry where by water among the trees
The delicate-stepping stag and his lady sigh,
When they have but looked upon their images--
Would none had ever loved but you and I!Or have you heard that sliding silver-shoed
Pale silver-proud queen-woman of the sky,
When the sun looked out of his golden hood?--
O that none ever loved but you and I!O hurry to the ragged wood, for there
I will drive all those lovers out and cry—
O my share of the world, O yellow hair!
No one has ever loved but you and I.</p

„This beauty's kinder, yet for a reason
I could weep that the old is out of season“

—  W.B. Yeats

The Arrow http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1590/
In The Seven Woods (1904)
Contexto: I thought of your beauty, and this arrow,
Made out of a wild thought, is in my marrow.
There's no man may look upon her, no man,
As when newly grown to be a woman,
Tall and noble but with face and bosom
Delicate in colour as apple blossom.
This beauty's kinder, yet for a reason
I could weep that the old is out of season.

„O she had not these ways
When all the wild summer was in her gaze.“

—  W.B. Yeats

The Folly Of Being Comforted http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1623/
In The Seven Woods (1904)
Contexto: One that is ever kind said yesterday:
'Your well-belovéd's hair has threads of grey,
And little shadows come about her eyes;
Time can but make it easier to be wise
Though now it seems impossible, and so
All that you need is patience.'
Heart cries, 'No,
I have not a crumb of comfort, not a grain.
Time can but make her beauty over again:
Because of that great nobleness of hers
The fire that stirs about her, when she stirs,
Burns but more clearly. O she had not these ways
When all the wild summer was in her gaze.'
O heart! O heart! if she'd but turn her head,
You'd know the folly of being comforted.

„But O, in a minute she changed--“

—  W.B. Yeats

O Do Not Love Too Long http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1549/
In The Seven Woods (1904)
Contexto: Sweetheart, do not love too long:
I loved long and long,
And grew to be out of fashion
Like an old song.
All through the years of our youth
Neither could have known
Their own thought from the other's
We were so much at one.
But O, in a minute she changed--
O do not love too long,
Or you will grow out of fashion
Like an old song.

„Heaven blazing into the head:
Tragedy wrought to its uttermost.“

—  W.B. Yeats

Last Poems (1936-1939)
Contexto: Heaven blazing into the head:
Tragedy wrought to its uttermost.
Though Hamlet rambles and Lear rages,
And all the drop-scenes drop at once
Upon a hundred thousand stages,
It cannot grow by an inch or an ounce.

Lapis Lazuli, st. 2

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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