Frases de Plotino

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Plotino

Fecha de nacimiento: 203
Fecha de muerte: 270

Plotino fue un filósofo griego neoplatónico, autor de las Enéadas .

Obras

Enéadas
Plotino

Frases Plotino

„Morir es cambiar de cuerpo como el actor cambia de traje.“

—  Plotino

Enéada III, 2 Sobre la providencia, libro 1
Fuente: Citado en ¿Todos los caracoles se mueren siempre? Como tratar la muerte en educación infantil. Varios autores. Ediciones de la Torre, 2010. ISBN 9788479604448. p. 269.

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„Porque ¿cómo podría uno anunciar a aquél como si fuera otro, siendo así que allá, cuando contemplaba, no lo veía como otro, sino como una sola cosa consigo mismo?“

—  Plotino, libro Enéadas

Enéada VI, 9 Sobre El Bien o el Uno
Fuente: Plotino. Enéadas. Ed. Gredos. Madrid, 1982. ISBN 8424908600. VI, 9. p. 553

„Pero si el Bien es algo, es algo de más alto rango que el conocimiento, la intelección y la conciencia de sí mismo.“

—  Plotino

Enéada VI, 7 Sobre cómo vino a la existencia la multiplicidad de las ideas, y sobre el Bien
Fuente: Ibid p. 487

„Si anteriormente al pensamiento el Bien es autosuficiente, siendo autosuficiente, para ser bien no necesitará del pensamiento acerca del Bien. Luego no se piensa a sí mismo como Bien.“

—  Plotino, libro Enéadas

Enéada VI, 7 Sobre cómo vino a la existencia la multiplicidad de las ideas, y sobre el Bien
Fuente: Plotino. Enéadas. Ed. Gredos. Madrid, 1982. ISBN 8424908600. VI, 7. p. 481

„Perhaps, the good and the beautiful are the same, and must be investigated by one and the same process; and in like manner the base and the evil.“

—  Plotinus

An Essay on the Beautiful
Contexto: Perhaps, the good and the beautiful are the same, and must be investigated by one and the same process; and in like manner the base and the evil. And in the first rank we must place the beautiful, and consider it as the same with the good; from which immediately emanates intellect as beautiful. Next to this, we must consider the soul receiving its beauty from intellect, and every inferior beauty deriving its origin from the forming power of the soul, whether conversant in fair actions and offices, or sciences and arts. Lastly, bodies themselves participate of beauty from the soul, which, as something divine, and a portion of the beautiful itself, renders whatever it supervenes and subdues, beautiful as far as its natural capacity will admit.
Let us, therefore, re-ascend to the good itself, which every soul desires; and in which it can alone find perfect repose. For if anyone shall become acquainted with this source of beauty he will then know what I say, and after what manner he is beautiful. Indeed, whatever is desirable is a kind of good, since to this desire tends. But they alone pursue true good, who rise to intelligible beauty, and so far only tend to good itself; as far as they lay aside the deformed vestments of matter, with which they become connected in their descent. Just as those who penetrate into the holy retreats of sacred mysteries, are first purified and then divest themselves of their garments, until someone by such a process, having dismissed everything foreign from the God, by himself alone, beholds the solitary principle of the universe, sincere, simple and pure, from which all things depend, and to whose transcendent perfections the eyes of all intelligent natures are directed, as the proper cause of being, life and intelligence. With what ardent love, with what strong desire will he who enjoys this transporting vision be inflamed while vehemently affecting to become one with this supreme beauty! For this it is ordained, that he who does not yet perceive him, yet desires him as good, but he who enjoys the vision is enraptured with his beauty, and is equally filled with admiration and delight. Hence, such a one is agitated with a salutary astonishment; is affected with the highest and truest love; derides vehement affections and inferior loves, and despises the beauty which he once approved. Such, too, is the condition of those who, on perceiving the forms of gods or daemons, no longer esteem the fairest of corporeal forms. What, then, must be the condition of that being, who beholds the beautiful itself?

„It is by participation of species that we call every sensible object beautiful.“

—  Plotinus

An Essay on the Beautiful
Contexto: It is by participation of species that we call every sensible object beautiful. Thus, since everything void of form is by nature fitted for its reception, as far as it is destitute of reason and form it is base and separate from the divine reason, the great fountain of forms; and whatever is entirely remote from this immortal source is perfectly base and deformed. And such is matter, which by its nature is ever averse from the supervening irradiations of form. Whenever, therefore, form accedes, it conciliates in amicable unity the parts which are about to compose a whole; for being itself one it is not wonderful that the subject of its power should tend to unity, as far as the nature of a compound will admit. Hence beauty is established in multitude when the many is reduced into one, and in this case it communicates itself both to the parts and to the whole. But when a particular one, composed from similar parts, is received it gives itself to the whole, without departing from the sameness and integrity of its nature. Thus at one and the same time it communicates itself to the whole building and its several parts; and at another time confines itself to a single stone, and then the first participation arises from the operations of art, but the second from the formation of nature. And hence body becomes beautiful through the communion supernally proceeding from divinity.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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