Frases de Joseph Addison

Joseph Addison Foto
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Joseph Addison

Fecha de nacimiento: 1. Mayo 1672
Fecha de muerte: 17. Junio 1719

Joseph Addison, escritor y político inglés. Nació en Milston, Wiltshire el 1 de mayo de 1672 y murió en Holland House, Kensington el 17 de junio de 1719.

Hijo del decano de la catedral de Lichfield, ya en 1694 publicó un libro sobre la vida de poetas ingleses y una traducción de las Geórgicas de Virgilio. En 1699 comienza a prepararse para el servicio diplomático, para lo cual viaja por toda Europa. Escribió diarios de viaje, por ejemplo sobre Italia y también sobre la campiña inglesa, y algunas obras de teatro, como Catón y El tamborilero .

Con Richard Steele funda la revista The Spectator en 1711, donde publica su obra Los placeres de la imaginación, en 1712. También escribió para la publicación The Tatler. Aunque se destacó como ensayista, participó en el Parlamento Inglés como representante whig, y entre 1717 e 1718 fue Secretario de Estado.

Frases Joseph Addison

„La lectura es para la mente lo que el ejercicio es para el cuerpo.“

—  Joseph Addison

Fuente: Villamarin Pulido, Luis Alberto. Superación personal: Tesoro de la sabiduría- Tomo II. Editorial Luis Villamarin, 2015. ISBN 9781512274851, p. 77.

„El saber, después de la virtud, es ciertamente lo que eleva a un hombre a mayor altura que otro.“

—  Joseph Addison

Fuente: Ortega Blake, Arturo. El gran libro de las frases célebres. Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial México, 2013 ISBN 978-60-7311-631-2.

„El hombre debe considerar siempre lo que tiene antes de lo que quiere; la infelicidad viene cuando la realidad no llega.“

—  Joseph Addison

Fuente: Escandón, Rafael, Frases célebres para toda ocasión. Editorial Diana, 1982. ISBN 978-96-8131-285-5, p. 118.

„En verdad que el hombre no es más que una sombra, y la vida, un sueño.“

—  Joseph Addison

Fuente: Morales Uribe, Alberto. Historias casi ficticias. Número 44 de Colección Cultiva. Editor Cultivalibros, 2009. ISBN 9788492519767, p. 9.

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„Mira en qué paz puede morir un cristiano.“

—  Joseph Addison

Últimas palabras
Original: «See in what peace a Christian can die».
Fuente: Aikin, Lucy. The Life of Joseph Addison, volumen 2. Library of English literature. Editorial Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1843. Página 236. https://books.google.es/books?id=xEoJAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA236&dq=See+in+what+peace+a+Christian+can+die.+Joseph+Addison&hl=es&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjzm9HkuObfAhVy1-AKHdPrA7QQ6AEIKDAA#v=onepage&q=See%20in%20what%20peace%20a%20Christian%20can%20die.%20Joseph%20Addison&f=false

„Pero para considerar este tema en sus luces más ridículas, los anuncios son de gran utilidad para los vulgares. En primer lugar ya que son instrumentos de la ambición. Un hombre que de ninguna manera es lo suficientemente grande para la Gazette, puede deslizarse fácilmente en los anuncios; por lo que a menudo vemos un boticario en el mismo periódico de noticias que un plenipotenciario, o a un lacayo con un embajador.“

—  Joseph Addison

Original: «But to consider this subject in its most ridiculous lights, advertisements are of great use to the vulgar. First of all as they are instruments of ambition. A man that is by no means big enough for the Gazette, may easily creep into the advertisements; by which means we often see an apothecary in the same paper of news with a plenipotentiary, or a running footman with an ambassador».
Fuente: The Tatler n.º 224, jueves, 14 de septiembre de 1710. Addison, Joseph. The Tatler. The Guardian. The Freeholder. The Whig-examiner. The lover. Dialogues upon the usefulness of ancient medals... Volumen 3 de The Works of Joseph Addison. Editorial Harper & Brothers, 1845. Página 67. https://books.google.es/books?id=mPk7AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA67&dq=Advertisements+are+of+great+use+to+the+vulgar.+First+of+all,+as+they+are+instruments+of+ambition.+A+man+that+is+by+no+means+big+enough+for+the+Gazette,+may+easily+creep+into+the+advertisements;+by+which+means+we+often+see+an+apothecary+in+the+same+paper+of+news+with+a+plenipotentiary,+or+a+running+footman+with+an+ambassador&hl=es&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjtqeWPpObfAhVG1eAKHYr6C1sQ6AEILzAB#v=onepage&q=Advertisements%20are%20of%20great%20use%20to%20the%20vulgar.%20First%20of%20all%2C%20as%20they%20are%20instruments%20of%20ambition.%20A%20man%20that%20is%20by%20no%20means%20big%20enough%20for%20the%20Gazette%2C%20may%20easily%20creep%20into%20the%20advertisements%3B%20by%20which%20means%20we%20often%20see%20an%20apothecary%20in%20the%20same%20paper%20of%20news%20with%20a%20plenipotentiary%2C%20or%20a%20running%20footman%20with%20an%20ambassador&f=false

„No hay una cosa tan variable en la naturaleza como el tocado de una dama: en mi propia memoria, lo he visto subir y bajar más de treinta grados.“

—  Joseph Addison

Original: «There is not so variable a thing in nature as a lady's headdress: within my own memory I have known it rise and fall above thirty degrees».
Fuente: Spectator, número 98. The Works of the Right Honourable Joseph Addison, Volumen 3. Joseph Addison. Editor Richard Hurd. Editorial T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1811. Página 227. https://books.google.es/books?id=coRjAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA227&dq=There+is+not+so+variable+a+thing+in+nature+as+a+lady%27s+head-dress.+Joseph+Addison&hl=es&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjXur3ztObfAhUEcBQKHbSGDFcQ6AEIKDAA#v=onepage&q=There%20is%20not%20so%20variable%20a%20thing%20in%20nature%20as%20a%20lady's%20head-dress.%20Joseph%20Addison&f=false

„La verdadera felicidad no está confinada en ningún lugar, pero aún se encuentra en una mente contenta.“

—  Joseph Addison

Original: «True happiness is to no place confined, But still is found in a contented mind».
Fuente: The Works of Joseph Addison: The Spectator, no. 1-314. Volumen 1 de The Works of Joseph Addison: Complete in Three Volumes: Embracing the Whole of the "Spectator. Joseph Addison. Harper & Brothers, 1837. Página 289. https://books.google.es/books?id=1Z1KAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA289&lpg=PA289&dq=Joy+is,+above+all,+health+promotion.+Joseph+Addison&source=bl&ots=K1uJNCNc_Z&sig=EcApzQUNAdTWH-uJs1lvW7OXoJY&hl=es&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj69siqsebfAhVR1xoKHc30CrwQ6AEwCXoECAYQAQ#v=onepage&q=True%20happiness%20is%20to%20no%20place%20confin'd%2C%20&f=false

„When I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out“

—  Joseph Addison

Thoughts in Westminster Abbey (1711).
Contexto: When I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tombstone, my heart melts with compassion; when I see the tomb of the parents themselves, I consider the vanity of grieving for those whom we must quickly follow: when I see kings lying by those who deposed them, when I consider rival wits placed side by side, or the holy men that divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the little competitions, factions, and debates of mankind.

„Reading is to the mind, what exercise is to the body.“

—  Joseph Addison

No. 147.
The Tatler (1711–1714)
Variante: A good conscience is to the soul what health is to the body
Contexto: Reading is to the mind, what exercise is to the body. As by the one, health is preserved, strengthened, and invigorated: by the other, virtue (which is the health of the mind) is kept alive, cherished, and confirmed.

„In a word, his hopes are full of immortality, his schemes are large and glorious, and his conduct suitable to one who knows his true interest, and how to pursue it by proper methods.“

—  Joseph Addison

No. 225.
The Tatler (1711–1714)
Contexto: The cast of mind which is natural to a discreet man, make him look forward into futurity, and consider what will be his condition millions of ages hence, as well as what it is at present. He knows that the misery or happiness which are reserved for him in another world, lose nothing of their reality by being placed at so great a distance from him. The objects do not appear little to him because they are remote. He considers that those pleasures and pains which lie hid in eternity, approach nearer to him every moment, and will be present with him in their full weight and measure, as much as those pains and pleasures which he feels at this very instant. For this reason he is careful to secure to himself that which is the proper happiness of his nature, and the ultimate design of his being. He carries his thoughts to the end of every action, and considers the most distant as well as the most immediate effects of it. He supersedes every little prospect of gain and advantage which offers itself here, if he does not find it consistent with his views of an hereafter. In a word, his hopes are full of immortality, his schemes are large and glorious, and his conduct suitable to one who knows his true interest, and how to pursue it by proper methods.

„Discretion has large and extended views, and, like a well-formed eye, commands a whole horizon: cunning is a kind of short-sightedness, that discovers the minutest objects which are near at hand, but is not able to discern things at a distance. Discretion the more it is discovered, gives a greater authority to the person who possesses it: cunning, when it is once detected, loses its force, and makes a man incapable of bringing about even those events which he might have done had he passed only for a plain man.“

—  Joseph Addison

No. 225.
The Tatler (1711–1714)
Contexto: At the same time that I think discretion the most useful talent a man can be master of, I look upon cunning to be the accomplishment of little, mean, ungenerous minds. Discretion points out the noblest ends to us, and pursues the most proper and laudable methods of attaining them: cunning has only private selfish aims, and sticks at nothing which may make them succeed. Discretion has large and extended views, and, like a well-formed eye, commands a whole horizon: cunning is a kind of short-sightedness, that discovers the minutest objects which are near at hand, but is not able to discern things at a distance. Discretion the more it is discovered, gives a greater authority to the person who possesses it: cunning, when it is once detected, loses its force, and makes a man incapable of bringing about even those events which he might have done had he passed only for a plain man. Discretion is the perfection of reason, and a guide to us in all the duties of life: cunning is a kind of instinct, that only looks out after our immediate interest and welfare. Discretion is only found in men of strong sense and good understandings, cunning is often to be met with in brutes themselves, and in persons who are but the fewest removes from them.

„The Fear of Death often proves Mortal“

—  Joseph Addison

No. 25 (29 March 1711).
The Spectator (1711–1714)
Contexto: The Fear of Death often proves Mortal, and sets People on Methods to save their Lives, which infallibly destroy them.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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