Frases de James Clerk Maxwell

James Clerk Maxwell Foto
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James Clerk Maxwell

Fecha de nacimiento: 13. Junio 1831
Fecha de muerte: 5. Noviembre 1879

James Clerk Maxwell fue un físico escocés conocido principalmente por haber desarrollado la teoría electromagnética clásica, sintetizando todas las anteriores observaciones, experimentos y leyes sobre electricidad, magnetismo y aun sobre óptica, en una teoría consistente. Las ecuaciones de Maxwell demostraron que la electricidad, el magnetismo y hasta la luz, son manifestaciones del mismo fenómeno: el campo electromagnético. Desde ese momento, todas las otras leyes y ecuaciones clásicas de estas disciplinas se convirtieron en casos simplificados de las ecuaciones de Maxwell. Su trabajo sobre electromagnetismo ha sido llamado la «segunda gran unificación en física», después de la primera llevada a cabo por Isaac Newton. Además se le conoce por la estadística de Maxwell-Boltzmann en la teoría cinética de gases.

Maxwell fue una de las mentes matemáticas más preclaras de su tiempo, y muchos físicos lo consideran el científico del siglo XIX que más influencia tuvo sobre la física del siglo XX habiendo hecho contribuciones fundamentales en la comprensión de la naturaleza. Muchos consideran que sus contribuciones a la ciencia son de la misma magnitud que las de Isaac Newton y Albert Einstein. En 1931, con motivo de la conmemoración del centenario de su nacimiento, Albert Einstein describió el trabajo de Maxwell como «el más profundo y provechoso que la física ha experimentado desde los tiempos de Newton».

Frases James Clerk Maxwell

„El color que percibimos es una función de tres variables independientes, por lo menos son tres las que yo creo suficientes, pero el tiempo dirá si prosperan.“

—  James Clerk Maxwell

Fuente: Maxwell, en una carta a William Thomson, The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell: 1846-1862 (1990), p. 245.

„Podemos encontrar ejemplos de las más elevadas doctrinas de la ciencia en los juegos y la gimnasia, en los viajes por tierra y por agua, en las tormentas del cielo y del mar, y dondequiera que haya materia en movimiento.“

—  James Clerk Maxwell

Fuente: Introductory Lecture on Experimental Physics. Cambridge, octubre de 1871, re-editadas por W. D. Niven (2003). Volumen 2 de The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell, Courier Dover Publications, p. 243.

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„In every branch of knowledge the progress is proportional to the amount of facts on which to build“

—  James Clerk Maxwell

Letter to Lewis Campbell (9 November 1851) in Ch. 6 : Undergraduate Life At Cambridge October 1850 to January 1854 — ÆT. 19-22, p. 159
Contexto: In every branch of knowledge the progress is proportional to the amount of facts on which to build, and therefore to the facility of obtaining data.

„I mean—that I have the capacity of being more wicked than any example that man could set me, and that if I escape, it is only by God's grace“

—  James Clerk Maxwell

Letter to Rev. C. B. Tayler ( 8 July 1853) in Ch. 6 : Undergraduate Life At Cambridge October 1850 to January 1854 — ÆT. 19-22, p. 189
Contexto: I maintain that all the evil influences that I can trace have been internal and not external, you know what I mean—that I have the capacity of being more wicked than any example that man could set me, and that if I escape, it is only by God's grace helping me to get rid of myself, partially in science, more completely in society, — but not perfectly except by committing myself to God as the instrument of His will, not doubtfully, but in the certain hope that that Will will be plain enough at the proper time. Nevertheless, you see things from the outside directly, and I only by reflexion, so I hope that you will not tell me you have little fault to find with me, without finding that little and communicating it.

„Happiness and Misery must inevitably increase with increasing Power and Knowledge“

—  James Clerk Maxwell

Letter to Lewis Campbell (9 November 1851) in Ch. 6 : Undergraduate Life At Cambridge October 1850 to January 1854 — ÆT. 19-22, p. 158
Contexto: I believe, with the Westminster Divines and their predecessors ad Infinitum that "Man's chief end is to glorify God and to enjoy him for ever."
That for this end to every man has been given a progressively increasing power of communication with other creatures.
That with his powers his susceptibilities increase. That happiness is indissolubly connected with the full exercise of these powers in their intended direction. That Happiness and Misery must inevitably increase with increasing Power and Knowledge. That the translation from the one course to the other is essentially miraculous, while the progress is natural. But the subject is too high. I will not, however, stop short, but proceed to Intellectual Pursuits.

„But we have no right to think thus of the unsearchable riches of creation, or of the untried fertility of those fresh minds into which these riches will continue to be poured.“

—  James Clerk Maxwell

Introductory Lecture on Experimental Physics held at Cambridge in October 1871, re-edited by W. D. Niven (2003) in Volume 2 of The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell, Courier Dover Publications, p. 241; this has sometimes been misquoted in a way which considerably alters its intent: "in a few years, all the great physical constants will have been approximately estimated, and … the only occupation which will then be left to the men of science will be to carry these measurement to another place of decimals."
Contexto: This characteristic of modern experiments — that they consist principally of measurements — is so prominent, that the opinion seems to have got abroad, that in a few years all the great physical constants will have been approximately estimated, and that the only occupation which will then be left to men of science will be to carry on these measurements to another place of decimals. If this is really the state of things to which we are approaching, our Laboratory may perhaps become celebrated as a place of conscientious labour and consummate skill, but it will be out of place in the University, and ought rather to be classed with the other great workshops of our country, where equal ability is directed to more useful ends.
But we have no right to think thus of the unsearchable riches of creation, or of the untried fertility of those fresh minds into which these riches will continue to be poured. It may possibly be true that, in some of those fields of discovery which lie open to such rough observations as can be made without artificial methods, the great explorers of former times have appropriated most of what is valuable, and that the gleanings which remain are sought after, rather for their abstruseness, than for their intrinsic worth. But the history of science shews that even during the phase of her progress in which she devotes herself to improving the accuracy of the numerical measurement of quantities with which she has long been familiar, she is preparing the materials for the subjugation of the new regions, which would have remained unknown if she had been contented with the rough methods of her early pioneers. I might bring forward instances gathered from every branch of science, shewing how the labour of careful measurement has been rewarded by the discovery of new fields of research, and by the development of new scientific ideas. But the history of the science of terrestrial magnetism affords us a sufficient example of what may be done by experiments in concert, such as we hope some day to perform in our Laboratory.

„I hope that you will not tell me you have little fault to find with me, without finding that little and communicating it.“

—  James Clerk Maxwell

Letter to Rev. C. B. Tayler ( 8 July 1853) in Ch. 6 : Undergraduate Life At Cambridge October 1850 to January 1854 — ÆT. 19-22, p. 189
Contexto: I maintain that all the evil influences that I can trace have been internal and not external, you know what I mean—that I have the capacity of being more wicked than any example that man could set me, and that if I escape, it is only by God's grace helping me to get rid of myself, partially in science, more completely in society, — but not perfectly except by committing myself to God as the instrument of His will, not doubtfully, but in the certain hope that that Will will be plain enough at the proper time. Nevertheless, you see things from the outside directly, and I only by reflexion, so I hope that you will not tell me you have little fault to find with me, without finding that little and communicating it.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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